Tag Archives: university

Nov26

Get Involved On Campus

Amongst the hours you spend in classrooms listening to lectures and in the library buried in books, there is so much going on around campus that you might not be aware of. If you don’t take the time to see what’s out there, you could be missing out on some very cool and exciting opportunities. This goes for interning as well. In addition to searching for off-campus internships, getting involved on campus can be incredibly beneficial. Not only do you get to meet and collaborate with people who share your interests, but you also get the chance to learn valuable skills that you can take with you even after you graduate. We found a few students who are making the most of their time on campus. They shared their experiences with us and gave insight into what they’re learning along the way.

 

1394877_10200916929759878_601871716_nAndreia McLean, Wilfred Laurier University

“I am very actively involved in my campus’s Greek Life. Specifically in my own sorority, Alpha Phi, I serve on our executive board as the Panhellenic Delegate, bringing news from other sororities. I also oversee the recruitment process for all of the sororities on my campus.  I also serve on my campus’s Greek Council; a council of the Fraternities and Sororities on campus that cooperate to put on events to benefit different philanthropic initiatives, as well as socials to help unify us as a collective.

I’ve served in many different positions throughout my four years at Laurier, mostly in the recruitment or event planning departments, but this year has been my most involved. The skills I have learned in each of these roles are invaluable in the real working world. Recruitment has taught me how to sell anything from a product, to a group of people, to a lifestyle. And planning socials for the entire Greek Life community on my campus has taught me how to organize on a large scale, work with many different people, and plan and execute a successful large scale event. The skills I have learned through my leadership roles in Alpha Phi, Panhellenic, and Greek Council will be a great assist in finding, maintaining, and thriving in a working position after university.”

 

Raeniel Holgado, Simon Fraser University1420338_10153459231115328_1100437799_n

“At SFU, I am heavily involved with Enactus SFU. Enactus is a student-run organization that creates several entrepreneurial-driven projects to tackle various social issues within the community. In particular, I project manage a financial literacy program called “Count on Me”, which instills basic financial literacy skills to youth at-risk to inspire them to build a more sustainable future.

As a Project Manager, I learned a lot about managing a team and to hold every single member accountable. Another key take-away from my experience being a project lead is that time is your worst enemy. Hence, it’s pertinent to set S.M.A.R.T. goals to ensure you accomplish tasks in a timely fashion.”

 

Sam RNTS PicSam Sim, Ryerson University

“I’m involved in the Ted Rogers Management Conference (TRMC), Ryerson University Finance Society (RUFS) and the Ryerson Speech & Debate Association (RSDA). This year I’ve really gotten involved in the business community at Ryerson, especially with student groups. I’ve learned so much about marketing, management, team building and strategy from working on these teams. These are all skills you can’t just learn from reading a textbook. It’s much more effective to put them into practice.

There are so many other areas and industries I can take my journalism degree, besides just being a reporter. My interest ultimately lies in business and so being a part of these groups is not only allowing me to pick up useful business skills I can put on my resume, but an opportunity to explore all different industries to see what I’m passionate about.”

Oct09

Tips on Saving Money as an Intern by Diane Ly

Free-Money-2013-edition

The cold, hard truth is that most internships these days are unpaid or paid very little. That’s why as an intern, it’s crucial to be smart with your money and only spend on things you need. Here are some tips that got me through my unpaid internship days:

Bring your lunch: An average lunch costs at least $10, and if you’re interning three days a week, that’s $30 down the drain. A good way to take care of lunch is to make a big dinner the night before and save some to pack for the next day. Sandwiches are another filling and affordable way to make sure you’re eating a lunch everyday – a trip to the grocery’s worth of supplies can last you weeks!

Drink your morning coffee at home: There’s really no need to stop at a café every morning for your coffee. Buy some coffee grounds for $5-7 and have a morning cup of joe without shelling out cash at the start of each day. Spending that early in the morning will only limit what you can buy for the rest of the day.

Ask if your company will help with transportation costs: In New York City, it’s typical that a company will help you out with transportation by giving you a Metrocard to cover your trips to and from site; if they’re extra generous they’ll cover the entire month (which costs about $105 for an unlimited pass). Outside of NY, I’ve heard of many places offering reimbursements for gas to and from the workplace.

Unsubscribe from shopping e-mails: This one’s definitely a personal tip 🙂 Ever since I opted out of e-mails from websites like Gilt Groupe and Fab.com I haven’t found myself shopping online at all, which, let’s be honest, is a downfall for many of us. Getting rid of opportunities like that helps more than you think. Out of sight, out of mind…and nowhere near my wallet!

Oct08

Success Story: Landing The Job

I’m sure all of you have goals of getting hired after completing an internship. For many students in such a competitive industry, it’s hard to do. But this passionate and hardworking graduate managed to go from a Style Guru intern to Social Media Director at CollegeFashionista. Meet Sammy Luterbach and find out how she did it.

 

Sammy1Tell us a bit about yourself.

Growing up, I always knew I wanted to move to New York City and work in fashion. To skip over a lot of blood, sweat and tears and make a long story short, I did just that. Along the way, I discovered my love for cats, leopard print, and legal pads.

How did you first land your internship with CollegeFashionista?

Before I started school at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, I made a day trip to the city with friends to try to find a job. A boutique I wanted to work at wasn’t hiring, but one of the employees there wrote for CollegeFashionista. She asked to take my friend’s photo for the site, and I was immediately intrigued. I asked her about CollegeFashionista and checked it out the second I was near a computer (pre-iPhone; yikes!).

After finding out this was an online internship I could be a part of, I emailed Amy Levin, founder of CollegeFashionista, directly asking how I could get involved. We set up a phone interview, and the rest is history. I became a Style Guru one month after the site was launched four years ago.

What attracted you to this company?

I love fashion, and I love writing, so the fact that CollegeFashionista combined both initially attracted me to the company. The longer I worked and the more CollegeFashionista expanded though, I loved that I didn’t have to be in New York City to feel connected to the industry. By interning for CollegeFashionista, I could be in college in the middle of Wisconsin, work from my apartment and be a part of a fashion movement with other people like me.

What skills did you learn during your internship?

I always like writing, but CollegeFashionista helped me explore more of a journalistic approach. Although I’m not a strong photographer, I definitely learned more about photography and became better throughout the years. Most importantly for me, I learned all about social media. I specifically remember the conversation years ago where Amy convinced me to sign up for Twitter! On top of that, I improved my leadership skills, developed more of a business mind and even did some event planning. Through everything I did with CollegeFashionista, I gained confidence and a voice.

How long did you intern with CollegeFashionista?

Almost four years! I began in September of 2009 as a Style Guru and worked continuously until I moved to New York and started working for the company this past July.

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What was the most valuable thing you took from your internship experience?

Be genuine. There are so many people who will be catty, competitive and show-offy to fight to the top, but that will only get them so far. Hard work and passion will get you to where you need to be. Also, never expect that you think you know it all. Before CollegeFashionista, I thought I wanted to be a designer! This internship helped me learn otherwise.

How did you turn your internship into a job?

Turning my internship into a job at CollegeFashionista wasn’t something I planned for, although I definitely dreamed about it! I was the first employee to be hired by the Levin family, so I didn’t have anyone to emulate. I just fully dedicated myself to CollegeFashionista and always asked for more work. I tried to go above and beyond what was asked of me. I became an important part of the team through my work and passion for the company.

What role do you have within the company now?

I am the Social Media Director and Editorial Assistant. I manage all of CollegeFashionista’s social media platforms, operate the newsletter, help with special features on the website and work with the Head Style Gurus to spread the word about CollegeFashionista on campuses all over. Plus, there are always extra projects that come up on a daily basis depending on what’s happening in the office and on the site!

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment.

Dynamic. Everyday is different in the office, but it’s always fast-paced and full of energy. We work extremely hard but also manage to find the time for candy breaks and fun music.

What advice do you have for other interns?

Be genuine, work really hard and always say yes – you’ll figure out how to get it all done.

Oct01

Intern Spotlight: Taylor Hicks

Taylor HicksName: Taylor Hicks

Intern Position Title: Styling Intern

Company Name: Emily Current and Meritt Elliott (MAUDE)

Location: Los Angeles, California

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

My name is Taylor Hicks. I am currently 18 years old and I live in Los Angeles, California. I attend the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising, where I major in Merchandise Marketing. I was also recently chosen to be the Fashion Director of FIDM’s student-run magazine FIDM MODE. Finally, I have had four amazing internships in the past year at companies such as Emily Current and Meritt Elliott, Jimmy Choo, WhoWhatWear, and Teen Vogue.

 

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

I am currently interning with celebrity stylists and designers Emily Current and Meritt Elliott. I landed this internship by essentially doing my research and frequently following up. I knew I had a deep interest in celebrity styling and therefore, wanted to gain valuable experience by interning for major stylists. I found Emily and Meritt’s official website and after doing a little digging, I came across a contact email for inquiries. I immediately sent an email to the contact, explaining my previous experiences and interest in styling. I had to follow up at least two times before I received a response. Once I heard back, I was given an interview a week later and got the internship on the spot! I have been interning for them ever since.

What attracted you to this company?

I have always had a passion for pop culture and styling for as long as I can remember. Also, I have been a massive fan and admirer of Emily and Meritt’s work with their denim line Current/Elliott and celebrity clients like Emma Roberts and Mandy Moore. That said, it was a no-brainer when it came time to decide which celebrity stylists I was most interested in interning for. Today, Emily and Meritt have a total of six celebrity clients, including Jessica Alba, Emma Roberts, Sophia Bush, Mandy Moore, Ashley Tisdale, and Nikki Reed. Their styling aesthetic greatly represents the young, experimental lady who is seen by many as a true trendsetter, which is exactly where my heart lies when it comes to celebrity styling.

What skills are you learning at this internship?

There are an abundance of skills that I have learned from interning for Emily Current and Meritt Elliott, which include time management, networking, project management, decision-making, etc. The skills that my internship has taught me are invaluable and have helped me grow in my professional career by allowing me to dive head first into the world of styling and maneuver my way through every situation.

What has been a highlight so far?

The highlight of my internship has been all of the individuals who I am fortunate enough to work with on a daily basis. From Emily and Meritt’s team and their celebrity clientele to the employees at the public relations companies; each of them have made my internship more incredible and educational. I pinch myself every single day because I have been given the opportunity to work with people who believe in me and trust me while allowing me to live out my dreams.

Most challenging part?

The most challenging part of my internship has to be accepting the fact that nothing is ever going to be perfect and that obstacles and set-backs are inevitable. I tend to be a perfectionist and I am a tad bit OCD when it comes to organization and execution so it has definitely been a challenge to accept that I will make mistakes and there are always problems. However, I have come to learn that being a stylist is so much more than just creating looks because a large aspect of the career is problem-solving, which is a challenge in its own right.

Could you describe what a typical day is like for you as an intern?

A typical day for me as an intern is insanely busy and unpredictable, which I love. I usually begin my day at the studio, organizing all of the racks of clothes to be set up for a fitting or returned to PR companies. After I have returned all of the clothes and accessories to PR companies, I head back to the studio to get prepared for pick-ups of new clothes and accessories for the next fitting. Then, there are some days when we have fittings or photo shoots and my day is completely spent preparing for those or working at them. The most exciting part of my internship are the fittings and photo shoots because everything is so hands-on and in the moment. These two events are when I am able to learn the most and see how my bosses work their magic.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Stimulating.

What advice would you give to someone just starting to look for an internship?

The best advice that I can give to someone that is just starting to look for an internship is to have a deep passion for what you’re doing and to never stop trying. You will always have to follow up with people because of their busy schedules and not everyone is going to tell you ‘yes.’ However, this should never stop you from chasing after your dreams because I know so many people who are living proof that ambition and hard work can take you wherever you want to go. Also, kindness is always in style and it will take you far in life because people who are nice are always remembered.

What is your dream job?

My dream job is to be in styling, whether it’s celebrity styling, editorial, or being a fashion director for a major department store. I love merchandise and that is exactly what I want my career to surround itself around. Ultimately, I want a career that allows me to indulge myself in every aspect of fashion and I think working at a magazine like Teen Vogue or a department store like Bloomingdale’s could allow for that.

Jul16

Intern Spotlight: Kristen Higuera

DSC_0518Interviewee Name: Kristen Higuera

Intern Position Title: A&R/Marketing Intern

Company Name: A&M/Octone Records

Location: New York, New York

Tell us a bit about yourself:

I am going into my senior year at Texas A&M University pursuing a degree in Communications with a minor in art. Oh, and I really like music.

 

CreativeInterns: Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

Kristen Higuera: Lots and lots of research. With A&M/Octone, I had a phone interview then a Skype interview…and before I knew it I was on a plane headed to NYC.

CI: What attracted you to this company?

KH: A&M/Octone’s artist roster is extremely diverse. I felt that I could get a taste of what it is like to work with various genres instead of just one.

CI: What skills are you learning while at your internship?

KH: It is a very hands-on experience filled with brainstorming sessions and production meetings. I’m learning a lot about the logistics that go into keeping up with each and every artist signed to the label.

CI: Can you describe what a normal day is for an intern at your company?

KH: There really isn’t a “normal day” at the office and I love that. Everyday when I walk in at 10am, I never know what I might do or where I might be. I have gotten the chance to go on some really cool adventures to places like Jimi Hendrix’s Electric Lady Studios, Spotify, and MTV.

CI: How would you describe your workplace environment in three words or less?

KH: Laid back.

CI: What advice would you give to someone just DSC_0524starting to look for an internship?

KH: Decide what to be and go be it.

CI: What do you do to fill the inspiration gas tank?

KH: Nothing is more inspiring then an adventure with some swell tunes and good company.

CI: What’s next for you?

KH: We’ll see..

CI: What’s your dream job?

I am film and music enthusiast, so eventually I hope to find myself making the soundtracks for movies and TV shows.

Jul11

Sharing Wisdom: Tips From 8 Interns

With any internship experience, whether you’re just doing it for college credit or want to network your way into your dream job, you’re going to want to make the most out of it. How you might ask? If you’re new to the world of interning and need a bit of guidance, here are eight hardworking interns who were kind enough to share their wisdom.

We asked: What is the most important thing you’ve learned from an internship?

Christian Allaire, Ryerson University486572_4190918585353_1641567635_n

“Go after what you want. In a time when companies are increasingly relying on the help of interns, it’s not always easy getting to do everything you had hoped to do during your internship. So on top of being an asset to your workplace, you should also make personal objectives for yourself as well – whether that’s exploring the different departments or building relationships with editors.”

1059402_10151705432759875_1799658392_nNaomi Leanage, University of Guelph-Humber

The most important thing I’ve learned from an internship is that going above and beyond of what’s expected of you is what’s going to make you get noticed. There are dozens of other interns with the same skills and knowledge that you have, and the one thing that will make you stand out is your passion! At my internship at Tribute, I made an effort to check in with my editor everyday to chat, even about things that didn’t relate to tasks that I was working on. It helped build a relationship with her, and I’m for sure someone she’ll remember in a line of ever-changing interns. I also made sure to express my interests (doing interviews, writing movie reviews) and because of that, I’ve gotten opportunities in two weeks that other interns had to wait months to receive. It’s important not to be intimidated, and if you have a great idea, to go ahead and pitch it!

Erin McHenry, Drake Universityerin

“After interning as a communications intern for a government agency, I learned that I’m NOT interested in corporate communication the government . I learned a lot and greatly improved my writing skills, which will be helpful for any job I take. Even if you don’t enjoy an internship you still learn something: It’s not the right place for you, and you’re one step closer to finding your perfect job.”

DSC_0298Kaela Popoff, Kwantlen University

“The key thing I learned from my internship was the importance of communication. Checking in with your supervisors or boss about where you are at with your work and what you’ve completed helps them know how much work to give you. This way you’re never swamped nor bored, and you can meet your deadlines!”

 

Catherine Dugas, Fashion Institute of Technology1060927_10151707634803874_1698531869_n

“The most valuable thing I’ve learned from interning has to be that organization and attention to detail are key. There are so many small details that go into running a big company and they truly make all the difference. If you aren’t naturally organized, make sure to use an agenda and download organization apps on your phone keep you on point!”

Dun011112 - Version 2Hillary MacDonald, Ryerson University

“Listen, observe and pick the brains of those who work in positions that you would like to one day have.”

 

 

Kristin Doherty, Drake UniversityDoherty1

“What I’ve learned most is how important it is to work as a team with your coworkers and fellow interns. At the beginning of my internship, I felt a little competitive about who was getting the best assignments or doing the best job. But now I realize that we’re all working toward the same team goals. It’s more important for each of us to play to our strengths for the benefit of the team than to compete with each other for recognition or attention.”

DSC_0151 - Version 2Terrence Freeman, Humber College

“The most important thing I have learned from my internship so far is that things are rarely black and white, and you have to expect the unexpected. You have to figure a lot of things out on your own as you go, and you will likely run into dilemmas and have to figure out a lot on the spot without the help of your bosses who are often busy, or may not be there to help such as in a case where you are out of the office running an errand. I’ve now learned to expect to run into slight dilemmas here and there, so I try to ask my bosses an many questions as possible when I can before a task, and I also try to understand and remember what my bosses would want or do in the situation.”

Jul02

Intern Spotlight: Nicole Diane Girten

DSC_0375Interviewee Name: Nicole Diane Girten

Intern Position Title: Editing/Social Media Intern

Company Name: TrendSeeder

Company URL: http://www.trendseeder.com

Location (City/State): New York City, New York

Tell us a bit about yourself:

I’m a rising sophomore at the Florida State University pursuing an English major with concentrations in Creative Writing as well as Editing, Writing and Media. I’m currently the Campus CEO for the TrendSeeder Campus Leadership Program at FSU, leading a team of six in TrendSeeder objectives on campus and within the Tallahassee area. I also blog and act as a photo-shoot set assistant for an on-campus fashion magazine called Diverse World Fashion, which publishes an issue every semester. I previously worked as an assistant and sales associate for Miami-based jewelry designer, and Project Accessory runner-up, Nina Cortes. It was under Nina’s apprenticeship that I became inspired to pursue a career in the industry. This summer, I’m working as an Editing and Social Media Intern for TrendSeeder at their headquarters in New York City. I write weekly articles and contribute to TrendSeeder’s social media presence. While in the city I also took the opportunity to work as a set assistant for a Harper’s Bazaar Latin America shoot for three days.  I plan to continue building my portfolio and working towards my goal of writing freelance in fashion.

What steps did you take to land this internship?

I started my internship hunt last December, just looking through the careers tabs of websites I really enjoyed and started sending applications out. I was talking with a friend about my search and she told me about TrendSeeder’s Campus Leadership Program and told me to apply and see what happens. I originally intended to just be a fashion editor for the program, but decided to take the jump and go for the CEO position, which included a summer internship at the TrendSeeder headquarters in New York City. A few weeks after filling out the application and taking a phone interview, I got the call saying I would be summering in the city and writing for the TrendSeeder Editorial. To say the least, I was ecstatic!

What attracted you to this company?

TrendSeeder promotes and creates a platform for emerging designers, and having worked with emerging jewelry designer Nina Cortes, I was familiar with the perspective TrendSeeder was reflecting. I felt I would be able to use my previous work experience to my advantage and could better express the company’s point of view in my writing. I also wanted to work in fashion, and I saw TrendSeeder as an amazing opportunity to do so.

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What skills are you learning while at your internship?

I am learning the ins and outs of the fashion industry, as well as the world of editing. I am getting to experience hands-on the work that goes into every aspect of fashion—from marketing and strategic partnerships to creative content and social media, I’m learning what goes into running a fashion company.

Can you describe what a normal day is for an intern at your company?

On a normal day I come in around 10, get settled with my laptop and a cup of coffee and start working on the article assigned to me that week. I will also start posting on a variety of different social media sites, and I normally like to flip back and forth between the two. I’ll do one Polyvore post a day on average and post products to sites like Wanelo as well. I also keep up with the TrendSeederFSU social media, so I’ll intermittently do posts on that Facebook page and Twitter as well. In the afternoon we’ll normally either have a marketing meeting or a collaborative discussion about whatever project needs attention. Sometimes the team will even make mini field trips to sample sales on 5th Ave or take meetings with editorial writers. Every day holds a new possibility!

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Wonderful! Avani, TrendSeeder’s CEO, is really dedicated to making the work environment friendly and cooperative. All the executives are very approachable and want to collaborate with, or get input from, the interns in many different aspects of the company. It really makes for a positive place to work.

What advice would you give to someone just starting to look for an internship?

Find what you love and attack it full force. This sounds incredibly cliché, but with determination and a pinch of luck, you really can make anything happen. Do not waste your time and energy trying to excel at something you hate. That takes twice the effort with an emotional toll to boot. Push yourself, but realize that you are not going to necessarily succeed at everything at first. You are going to stumble and fall eventually, and accepting this off the bat is important; try to land as gracefully as possible, dust yourself off and keep on your way. Be opportunistic. When you see a door, do not hesitate to throw yourself through it. Every time a potential something crosses your path, even if you feel it might be out of reach, jump at it. New experiences are chances to grow and this reflects well on a resume. Work hard, keep your chin up and magic will happen.

What do you do to fill the inspiration gas tank?

Being in New York City has been an inspiration overload. From street style, to the architecture, to park performers, the endless possibilities and the variety of people here are what currently drive my creative efforts. I also find a lot of inspiration online with sites like Tumblr and Wanelo by just scrolling through and seeing what my eye is drawn to. Seeing the eclectic array of posts varying from typography and quotes, to graphic design and fashion campaigns is always a good way to get the creative juices flowing. I also love to practice yoga to help keep both mind and body in check. A clear head and a healthy body are personal needs to keep myself in tune creatively.

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What’s next for you?

I am going to continue working on my English major, keep up with TrendSeederFSU and Diverse World Fashion on campus and keep my eye out for new opportunities! I definitely want to come back to the city next summer, so I will either intern again with TrendSeeder or explore other options, but that decision is still a few months out. I’m also starting to look into grad schools, though this is a decision I have even longer to make. I’m just mostly trying to focus on the present, whether it is school or work, and push myself to do the best I can.

What’s your dream job?

I really would love to write freelance in fashion. Whether it’s for blogs or the major magazines, I really want to have my work in a multitude of publications. I think I would like the flexibility in the hours and the freedom to work where I please, though I do realize how insecure a career it is in comparison to a 9 to 5. Of course, I am young and my career path will probably shift here and there, but above all I really just want to be constantly surrounded with artistically-minded people. I think if I find an environment where I feel creatively motivated, I will be set.

Jun20

Career Tips From a Student to a Student

7658261288_c10e49f50f_oSo you just graduated high school and are about to embark on the journey that is post secondary education. Excited? Nervous? Worried? That’s natural. Wait until you get to your senior year and about to enter the real world—yeah, now that’s scary.

I always wish I had someone older and wiser during my first year of university to send me in the right direction, but I was on my own to learn the ropes. So here I am, a little older and wiser, and I thought I’d share some of the things I’ve learned along the way.

Start early

Before you know it, you’ll be halfway through your undergrad and realize that you only have a couple more years to go. And it will fly by, I guarantee you. Put in the effort early and volunteer/intern as much as possible. Any contacts you make right off the bat are great and your network can only grow from there. Also, make the most of all the opportunities that come with campus life. Check job postings, bulletin boards, newspapers, everything—it never hurts to try! Get out there and take initiative.

Network, network, network

It’s always about who you know, in any industry. Start with your fellow classmates and people on campus. As a student, you have the luxury of being surrounded by so many talented people and who knows, any one of them could be the next Bill Gates. It’s also important to attend industry mixers, career events and anything else that relates to your field of interest. And once you’re there, don’t be shy to introduce yourself. By the end of your university experience, you want to have a solid bank of contacts that you can reach out to.

Get on social media

This does not mean you always need to be Instagramming your food or tweeting about the annoying person sitting next to you, think of social media as a platform for marketing yourself as a brand. Employers want to see what you have to offer and what better way than an online destination where they can get the best sense of you on a professional, and personal, level. It’s becoming more and more common to come across great job opportunities and career leads on social media sites.
Another way to use the digital tools to your full advantage is to start a blog. This is the easiest way to get your work out there and published for the world to see.

Positivity is key

There is absolutely no benefit of being a Debby-Downer when you’re going through your university experience. Yes, it can be stressful, but don’t let it get to you. Employers will take notice if you are always the one with a great attitude and are pleasant to be around. Why would anyone hire someone that sucks the life out of a room? Don’t be that person.

Surround yourself with the right people.

There’s a theory that you’re a reflection of the five of your closest friends and I agree 100 per cent. Even more than five people, I think the people around you play a crucial part in the type of path you end up on. If you have lazy, unmotivated people around you, they can—and will—get in the way of your success. Try to find like-minded people who can help you, rather than hinder your progress. Collaborate and grow rather than compromise and feel stuck. Once you have that core group of people who have similar goals and work-ethics, you can only go up from there.

I hope these tips will come in handy during your own university experience—Good luck!

Jun03

International Internship Experience: Climb Every Mountain-Sail Every Sea

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Ten years ago, who would have thought that one company could have employees working together from different countries, from all parts of the world, miles and miles away? The world is becoming more interconnected every day. Companies want to hire people from all around the world, exchange experiences and make their workforce more diverse and powerful.

As an international student, I can tell you from first-hand experience that companies like when you have overseas or international experience. I’m originally from Serbia. I found my way to Russia to study Russian in The Pushkin State Russian Institute over one summer and later in New York City to study Business and English at  New York Institute of Technology.

Every student that cares about their career and is hungry for experience should do at least one internship during their undergraduate studies. You can learn a lot from internship experiences. Even if the internship is unpaid, a quality company with knowledgeable workers and a structured internship program can boost your learning and help you develop new skills. Some unpaid internship programs are actually better than paid programs. It all depends on the type of experience and connections you are interested in obtaining.

You can earn industry experience, learn problem-solving skills, achieve accomplishments and all of that you can put on your resume to make it easier for you to get the job you are dreaming about. An international internship experience can benefit your career even more. Employers will recognize you as courageous for getting on the plane and flying into the unknown, working with other cultures and being able to use your knowledge and skills in any environment.

“Completing an internship overseas not only provides international work experience for your resume but also serves as a valuable cultural experience and network building opportunity. Also, if you want to practice improving a foreign language skill such as Spanish or Mandarin, consider interning in a country that requires you to speak these languages.”  says, Marc Scoleri, CEO of CreativeInterns.com and Co-Founder of Creative Village. There is no better way to master a foreign language than to immerse yourself in that country, so you can speak the language every day and hear it all around.

Some may think you need rich parents to get international internship experience, not true, you can first intern over the summer somewhere local and work a part-time job to save money to complete an international internship the following summer. There are many travel guides  explaining how to save money for traveling, and also revealing facts on how to travel for cheap. You might be surprised how many different opportunities there are and how many companies are seeking fresh talent coming from other countries to make their business better and  exchange knowledge, experience and ideas with them.

Housing and transportation can be costly so make sure you do your research and create savings goals and a budget before you hop on the plane, train or boat to your new destination. If you do good research you will be able to find great deals. Most of the companies will be happy to help you out, give you tips and tell you about local deals. Once you get there you will see that everything is not that complicated. You might go through a little cultural shock, but definitely by the end of the experience it will all be worth it. You will have expanded your horizons and gained more knowledge about different cultures and the world.

Long story short, an internship abroad offers you many benefits. It promises a memorable and enjoyable experience, but more than that it offers you the chance to impress potential employers.