Tag Archives: thank you letter

Jun26

5 Things to Do After a Job Interview

Follow-Up

You just had a great interview, and you think to yourself “this is it” — it’s the end of the process. You go home to hope and wait for the good news. However, it’s not over yet, so don’t just passively wait. Make sure you do the following things after the interview to maximize your chances of being hired.

Get the Interviewer’s Contact Information

At the end of the interview, always remember to obtain the business card of the people who you interviewed with. Make sure you have the cards of everyone you’ve met during the interview and have all their names, titles, emails, and mailing addresses correct.

Ask for Expected Decision-Making Time

It’s also important to ask at the end of the interview about a time when the final hiring decision will be made. Usually the decision takes about 1-2 weeks. However, some might take 3-4 months or even longer. Be sure to receive a clear answer from the company so that you can have more control and flexibility to arrange your future availability.

Send a Thank You Letter

A thank you letter is very important — it shows your interest and passion for the company. Make sure to send the thank you letter within 72 hours after your interview. It doesn’t really matter if it is a handwritten thank you card or a thank you email. Although a personal card is preferable, an email also works if you don’t have much time. Your thank you letter should include your appreciation of the interviewer’s time and interest, a reiteration of your capability for the position, and your desire for a further discussion with them. You should also personalize your thank you letter to every recipient by referencing something memorable or specific. See How to Write a Professional Thank You Letter.

Send a Follow-Up Email

Normally, one or two weeks after the interview is a good period of time to send a follow-up email if you haven’t heard anything. The follow-up email should be short and contain your inquiry of the current application status and whether the position has been filled. Make sure to restate your qualifications and why you think you are the good fit in the company at the end of the email. Learn more about this and other job search tips in Jumpstart Your Creative Career.

Make a Follow-Up Phone Call

If you still haven’t heard back from the company after sending the follow-up email, you might want to consider a phone call. Although many companies try to avoid job inquiry phone calls, it never hurts to give it a try. Maintain a professional phone etiquette, speak clearly about your desire and interest in the position, and ask if they need any further information from you. If no one picks up the phone, leave a voicemail and try to call again on another day. But don’t call more than three times — the hiring manager could get annoyed and it could backfire on you.

Written by Cathy Qiu

Jun11

Questions to Ask During Your Internship Interview

Internship Interview

In many ways, an internship interview is very similar to a job interview. However, there are some key questions every potential intern should ask their interviewer in order to know where they stand in the company if they do in fact get that position:

What is a typical day like?

Some companies aren’t clear about what an intern will actually do day-to-day in their office. It’s important to clearly understand what your responsibilities might be as an intern to ensure that you will actually be learning things that are worthwhile and gaining skills that are relevant to your goals.

Is there potential to extend my internship?

I’ve had internships in the past that ran the entirety of an academic quarter/semester but that I wanted to extend. Thankfully, I asked a couple weeks before my last day if I could stay longer and they said it would be fine, but not every company can accommodate this – some have already hired new interns for the next round. If it’s something you think you might want to stay at, ask during the interview or very early in the internship if extension is a possibility.

Could this lead to a full-time position?

Because of the growing competitive nature of internships in the past few years, it is no longer a given that an intern will gain rights to full-time employment after their term is finished. It’s a good thing to ask the interviewer whether or not they think the internship could realistically become a job if you do the job well. Some companies are too small or cannot at the time afford a full-time employee.

What positions have past interns gotten after completing this one?

It might help you get an idea of what career path this internship could lead you down. And don’t leave it up to the interviewer to tell you about the program. Depending on how large the company is, if you search enough on the Internet you will most likely find an intern review or testimonial.

Written by Diane Ly