Tag Archives: resume

Aug02

3 Tips for Interviewing the Interviewer

Interviewing the interviewer

If interviewing is a new skill for you then pay close attention to these three tips for interviewing the interviewer.

Research the company and the people who will be interviewing you

This is easier than ever to do these days with professional networks such as Linkedin and other social media pages like Instagram, Facebook or Youtube. Look for similar interests, previous places of employment to see if they may know people that are connected to you and associations or organizations the interviewer has affiliation with. In addition, consider who they follow on Linkedin to understand where they like to get their news from. These are great facts to use to generate engaging questions. Conversations related to past careers and topics from channels they follow on Youtube can be used to develop instant rapport.

Be prepared to answer questions about your skills and achievements

To prepare, look at your resume and and identify bullet points that are measurable accomplishments. They should look something like this, “Consistently overachieved delivery goal of 10 new postcard designs a week.” Now all you have to do is use your resume during the interview to point out the achievement on the resume and discuss how you actually overachieved that goal on a regular basis. If you have several of these achievements on your resume (which you should) then you will always be able to answer any question that sounds vaguely familiar to, “Why should we hire you?” or “What experience do you have?”

Show interest in the position by inquiring about next steps

Don’t leave the interview without finding out how you can follow up. You may have additional questions in the future as you continue interviewing. Ask the interviewer if they have a timeline for hiring? Is it one month, 2 weeks or did they just start interviewing and they still have 10 candidates to meet? This will show that you are interested in following up so ask for their business card or email/phone to do so. If you are truly interested in the position, let them know that the position sounds great and you look forward to taking any next steps they recommend.

Jun15

Triple your job chances with this simple thing

Resume Shoppe logo

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Debbie Resume

Apr29

5 Tricks that will make your LinkedIn profile stand out

LinkedIn_Profile

Why do you need to know some LinkedIn tricks?

LinkedIn is by far the biggest business and recruitment networking site that is available on the internet. There are many recruiters, headhunters and HR managers actively searching the listings for new employees as well as many businesses that are looking for business opportunities and partners. But if your profile does not make you stand out and let people know who you are and what you are capable of then you are likely to be overlooked. This is why it is vital to look at all of the professional LinkedIn tricks that are out there to help you to ensure that your LinkedIn profile gets noticed.

Make a detailed profile

Ensure that your profile is complete, use the tool that LinkedIn itself provides you to show your profile completeness and ensure that your profile is complete. Like your resume it needs to not show any major holes nor should you exaggerate anything that you include within your profile. If you are going to be making several updates and adding historical information to your profile it is often best to turn off your activity broadcasts so as not to bombard your connections with multiple updates. This can be done through “settings” and then “privacy controls” where you will find the option to turn them off.

Have a good heading and summary

Ensure that your summary and heading clearly reflect who you are and what your strengths and passions are. Most recruiters and others searchers will look at your headline and summary before they proceed any further with reading your profile so these must be spot on.

Use Keywords

Like any other search engine when you search for someone with a specific set of skills or a specific job title on LinkedIn the site will look for matches that contain the words that are being searched for. So if you are “Quality manager” and are looking for work in this area then you must ensure that you have the keywords used frequently within your profile, headline, and summary to ensure that you show up in the searches. So even if your last job title was “Organizational excellence manager” but the role was that of quality manager ensure that you say so or you will not get shown when people search for “quality manager”. The same goes for your skills and abilities, make sure that you clearly mention them and use the keywords that the recruiters and others will use when searching for them. This is one of the most important LinkedIn tricks from LinkedIn profile development experts if you want to be found by searchers.

Use a professional picture

While it may be OK to use that picture of you and the kids on holiday as your profile picture on Facebook or even a picture of your pet cat in a funny pose you will want to put forward a more professional image on LinkedIn. Always use a recent, clear professional quality picture of yourself for your profile picture on LinkedIn so that the searcher sees clearly who you are. Ensure that you are dressed and posed appropriately for your career in your picture.

Proofread carefully

Just like your resume, just a few simple avoidable mistakes can give completely the wrong impression to the reader of your profile. You must ensure that you carefully review and proofread your profile to eliminate all mistakes so that there is nothing to distract the reader or give the impression that you do not care about your profile.

Use a LinkedIn profile development service

A LinkedIn resume writing service or profile development service can help you to ensure that your profile is going to work for you. Having a professional with many years of experience using LinkedIn review and improve your profile can make a huge impact on how your profile is perceived and how often you will be found in searches. So if you really want to get the most from your profile use our LinkedIn tricks or contact resume writing service for professional help.

May21

How important is internship experience?

Photo by coletivopegadaIt is widely known that nowadays a college diploma will not guarantee you job, no matter how high your GPA is or how many honor societies you are involved with. Hands on experience is valued more and more.

Once you start college, you usually have 4 years before you have to get a job, start earning money and supporting yourself. I agree that some time in college is for parties, and having fun,  but I know that if you manage your time wisely you will actually have something of value to put on your resume so when you graduate, you can start looking for a job.

It is ideal to have few internships completed by the time you graduate. This experience counts as a huge asset. Employers will be looking for this experience on your resume. In fact, a lot of companies say that they will consider this as an important deciding factor on whether they will be accepting a new graduate for full-time position or not. I think this should be enough to get you motivated to build your resume while still in school so you can get out there and start looking for a internship. Resume building experience is just one benefit of completing several internships.

Many of us have been studying our major for few years but we don’t really have a clear picture of how it all applies in “real life” and the “work world.” When you are working as intern you get to know the secrets and techniques of different practical knowledge that you can’t really learn when you are confined in the four corners of your classroom. Although, this knowledge is concentrated on the practical application of your major, it could be very useful to you after you graduate.

A 4.0 GPA is not going to guarantee you a job, and a 4.0 GPA doesn’t always mean that you are able to use all your knowledge effectively in everyday life. During an internship, you are asked to perform specific tasks or help out on projects. Having these experiences can be your proof of your abilities and expose you to actual industry experience. You can use this experience to build up your portfolio or resume. In fact, it can be very beneficial for you if an entire project is assigned to you. This way, all credit for the project would be yours and you can explain the project and your achievement during an interview..

One of my favorite benefits of an internship is the networking and relationship building opportunities you get from working side by side other industry professionals. You can meet lots of very interesting people in your field, exchange experiences, knowledge and build your contacts or Linkedin profile. THis will benefit you when looking for a job. Also you will be more confident in yourself if you go through an internship experience.

These are just some of the benefits that you can get from completing several internships. So, if your college curriculum does not require you to complete an internship, it could only benefit you to find and complete at least one, if not three in your field of study.

Written by Ana Komnenovic