Tag Archives: New York City

Feb24

Social Media Week 2014: Off-Campus Learning

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www.socialmediaweek.org

Although the official Social Media Week NYC campus was at the Highline Stages, there were lots of individually organized events that also took advantage of the SMW excitement. Here’s a quick recap of some of the things we learned from throughout the city.

Screen Shot 2014-02-24 at 12.30.30 AMIs Social Killing Storytelling?

Where: AOL Headquarters

An impressive panel of industry experts came together at the AOL HQ, including Stacy Martinet of Mashable, James Bennet of The Atlantic, Heidi Moore of The Guardian, and Abigail Cusick of Bravo TV.  The panel was moderated by Tim McDonald of The Huffington Post, who kicked off a discussion revolving around the question: Is Social Killing Storytelling?

The unanimous answer: no.

“Being able to tell a great story isn’t tied to a specific length or medium,” says Stacy Martinet. The influx of social media has opened a lot of doors for the art of storytelling and it’s helping the media industry to get their content—long or short—seen by a wider audience.

And a tip for budding journalists: become a Twitter rock star. Heidi Moore of The Guardian spoke about how she uses Twitter and other social media platforms as an additional test during the hiring process. “You can tell the quality of a writer by their tweets,” says Moore. “ It’s a hiring tool.”

IMG_8930Calling All Journalists: How to Rebrand Yourself as a Content Marketing & Social Expert

Where: Gansevoort Park Avenue NYC

A powerhouse panel of industry insiders gave insight into the world of branded content. The panel consisted of Liz Miersch of Equinox, Anne Chertoff of Anne Chertoff Media, Jason Kaufman of Weber Shandwick and Nathan Lump of Condé Nast. The event was hosted by Masthead Media’s co-founders Amanda Pressner and Julie Hochheiser Ilkovich, who led the discussion on why journalists are becoming the key players when it comes to producing branded content.

All of the panelists had traditional editorial experience, but made the jump over to creating content for brands. For many companies, this is a completely new form of marketing, therefore opening a door of opportunities for individuals who know how to utilize social media and maximize money-making capabilities through branded content.

For Liz Miersch, her role as editor-in-chief of Q, an online magazine within the Equinox brand, didn’t exist before, so it’s been a learning experience. “You don’t have to be an expert before entering this space,” she says, “you enter this space and then become the expert.”

Journalists are the ones who are being looked to for knowledge and skills in the social and digital space. They know how to engage, interact and write compelling content. “Journalists know how to put soul into stories,” says Jason Kaufman.

DSC_0811Revolt TV: Watch, Engage, Invent

Where: The Dumbo Loft

Revolt TV and Huge held a special event focusing on social engagement and content programming. Joe McCaffrey of Huge carried a conversation with Jake Katz, VP of Audience Insight & Strategy at Revolt TV about the rise and fall of music television and Revolt TV’s vision for the future of the industry.

Revolt is a multi-platform TV network that was recently launched this past October by Sean Combs. It aims to be “the go-to source for music content, like ESPN is for sports,” explains Jake Katz.

An interesting point that came up was the importance of knowing your audience and how to strengthen your social media presence. Katz adds, “You can create a real meaningful experience on one platform” rather than stretch across as many as possible.

Although Social Media Week has come to an end, keep the conversation going. Tweet @CreativeInterns and let us know about your #SMWNYC experience!

Nov05

Career Path Interview: Online Fashion Features Editor Julia Rubin

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Julia Rubin is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and now works as the Associate Online Editor for Fashion Features at Teen Vogue. She gives insight into her internship experiences and shares some advice for students hoping to break into the ever-growing fashion industry.

During college, where did you gain internship experience?

I interned every summer in college. I interned at Yves Saint Laurent in New York for my first two summers and I was in the creative services/visual merchandising department. We were responsible for anything visual that was not designing the clothes, so that was the window displays, general store curation, what events looked like, and it was great. I loved it, but I knew I wanted to try something else. So that third summer, I spent half the week interning at Chanel in the communications department and the other half in sales and marketing at Phaidon, which is a publisher, and they have lots of really cool art and fashion and food books. I did those internships when I was in school and was always in New York, but knew that none of them were totally the right fit. During the school year, I worked for the arts and culture magazine at school, kind of like The Village Voice for Penn. So I worked there since the first day of school and rose through the ranks and eventually was the Editor-In-Chief. In my junior year I started up the campus blog. It was great. It was the point when I realized I loved writing, loved editing, and loved the Internet. Even though I interned in fashion, I was much more interested in media, and because of my background in fashion, it was easy to put the two together and start off as a fashion writer and editor.

What was the most important thing you learned from interning?

I just really loved that as an intern, you’re an observer. I’ve always been really interested in seeing how groups of people work, what structures are like, how everything works, and all the nitty gritty stuff. In terms of general skills, just seeing that the people who were the happiest were the people who were really really into what they did. That’s how my team was at YSL for example. They were all so obsessed with all the visual stuff; they lived it and breathed it. So I wanted to find something that I felt that way about because that’s why they were so good at their jobs. That’s ultimately what led me to realizing that my passion was writing and editing.

What was the most challenging part along the way during the job hunt when you were fresh out of school?

For me, the hardest thing was coming to terms with the fact that I wanted to be a writer and editor. This is a pretty difficult industry and it can be a trying thing on a personal level. So just deciding that I was going to do it and diving in head first, was definitely the scariest.

How did you land a job at Teen Vogue?

My first job out of school was with a fashion news site called Styleite. I was there for two years and I started out as an intern and was promoted a few different times. By the time I left, I was the managing editor of the site. In my first year at Styleite, I received an email from a web editor at Teen Vogue. It was really the coolest email I’ve ever gotten. She told me that she read my stuff on Styleite and she really liked my article on Karlie Kloss. We ended up keeping in touch, helping each other out and having a professional email relationship. A year later, I got an email from her saying that there was a position opening on the web team that she thought I’d be perfect for and her boss would be reaching out. And she did. The rest is history.

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

July was a very exciting month for me because a bunch of crazy things all happened at once. This was all within a matter of weeks, which was insane. I went to Berlin for a Selena Gomez event, which was really cool because I had never travelled anywhere, much less internationally, for work. That was super cool. Then I came back and found out that a feature story I had written for the magazine was green lit for an upcoming issue so I was hurrying to get that all together. It was super exciting because this was the first print story I had in the magazine and it was about teenage heroin use, which is a really crazy and important topic to cover right now. So I had to put the finishing touches on that. Also, Teen Vogue launched its video channel and I was able to be in one of the videos.  I don’t think I’m particularly good on camera but I was very flattered and really excited with how it all turned out. So it was cool to be able to do so many different things and it was very much a realization of how multi-faceted it is being at a magazine. Even though I’m on digital, I write lots of stories for the website but am still able to write for the magazine and work with video, so it was very cool to see all that come together and be a part of it.

What advice do you have for students hoping to get into this industry?

What I did was reach out to people I had some sort of connection to and really respected. The connection can be small. Reach out to people who are not total strangers and keep up with those people. Figuring out what you even like is also really important and just looking around. I found my first job from a tweet. A friend of the woman who became my boss told me to get in touch with her. It’s all just weird things like that. Always be open. Also don’t feel like you have to say yes. If you get a job opportunity that comes your way and you know that you’re not going to be happy there, don’t take it. If you genuinely think this is not something you want to do and you just want to say yes to end the job search, that’s not great. Wait until something comes along that could be an opportunity for you and a good launching point. Even if it ends up being something you don’t like, that’s okay too. Don’t be afraid to change direction. That’s okay. Get out as soon as you can. Life is too short.

Where do you see yourself in the next few years?

I think that what I’ll ultimately do, or continue to do, probably doesn’t exist right now. When I started college, the job that I had by the time I graduated did not exist. It just didn’t. When I graduated high school in 2006, the idea that you could be a paid writer and editor on the Internet, writing about fashion, going to all the same events that the print editors were going to, it was just unheard of. Those jobs just did not exist and if they did, they were very few and far between. My job at Teen Vogue didn’t exist until I started there. So I kind of have to imagine that what I do next doesn’t exist yet. The media industry is something that is just rapidly changing and the digital world really is expanding. I tell anyone who is looking to be a journalist now that there actually are more opportunities because magazine website staff keep growing and web-only places have fully fleshed-out mastheads now, which is great. I find it really encouraging.

Oct22

Startup Tips From Techweek NYC

Aspiring entrepreneurs, digital media specialists, investors and all-around tech lovers gathered at 82 Mercer Street on October 17th for Techweek, the first to launch in New York City (it was originally founded in Chicago in 2011). This NYC edition was full of summits, workshops, the LAUNCH startup competition and fashion tech runway show.

It was great to see so many passionate people following their dreams and who are eager to become their own bosses—many of them students or recent graduates. So this was definitely an event to take notes if you’re thinking of starting your own company, not to mention a great opportunity to network like crazy. Here’s a quick list of some of the key points that I learned from spending the day surrounded by such innovative and inspirational people with contagious entrepreneurial spirits.

1. Collaborate.

A great way to get your company out there is to work with other like-minded businesses. Whether that may be through some special cross-promotions or creative partnerships, there are so many different ways to do this. Think outside the box. This is how you can set yourself apart. An awesome example of a company coming up with cool collaborations is  Warby Parker, the affordable and stylish eyewear company that also helps others (for every pair that is sold, a pair is given to someone in need). One of their most popular collaborations was with the Man of Steel movie franchise, bringing the iconic Clark Kent-style frames to life. They’ve also teamed up with Ghostly, The Standard Hotel, and Pencils of Promise just to name a few. Through these projects, they’ve been able to put themselves on the map and are becoming a go-to eyewear destination, both online and off.

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Tim Riley, Director of Online Experience at Warby Parker

2. Be open.

I think the best way to thrive in such an innovative environment is to have an open mind. Sure, you have this fantastic idea, but always remember that things can change quickly. Zack O’Malley Greenburg of Forbes said it best during his panel on making it in New York City, “Don’t get married to your idea, be open to redesign.” He wrote Empire State of Mind: How Jay-Z Went From Street Corner to Corner Office, a book that takes a look into how the hip hop mogul took the business world by storm. Great ideas take time to develop and sometimes you have to go through quite a journey before reaching the final product—Jay-Z is no exception. Having an open mind makes this process much smoother.

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Kelly Reid (left) interviews Zack O’Malley Greenburg (right)

3. Build up a strong team.

Yes, you want to be independent, but everyone could use a solid support system. When starting up your own company, there’s a lot of planning (and stress) that goes into it, so it’s important to put together a reliable team of people you can depend on to help follow through with your vision. The co-founders of Hukkster, Erica Bell and Katie Finnegan, agree that “when you start your own thing, it’s constant pounding the pavement. When you have a team, it’s nice to have people helping you along the way.” Hukkster is a shopping app that aims to help customers find the best deals. They formed their team from a network they created and got references of people who would be fitting for the company.

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Hukkster co-founders Erica Bell (centre) and Katie Finnegan (right)

For more info on Techweek, be sure to visit www.techweek.com

Oct09

Tips on Saving Money as an Intern by Diane Ly

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The cold, hard truth is that most internships these days are unpaid or paid very little. That’s why as an intern, it’s crucial to be smart with your money and only spend on things you need. Here are some tips that got me through my unpaid internship days:

Bring your lunch: An average lunch costs at least $10, and if you’re interning three days a week, that’s $30 down the drain. A good way to take care of lunch is to make a big dinner the night before and save some to pack for the next day. Sandwiches are another filling and affordable way to make sure you’re eating a lunch everyday – a trip to the grocery’s worth of supplies can last you weeks!

Drink your morning coffee at home: There’s really no need to stop at a café every morning for your coffee. Buy some coffee grounds for $5-7 and have a morning cup of joe without shelling out cash at the start of each day. Spending that early in the morning will only limit what you can buy for the rest of the day.

Ask if your company will help with transportation costs: In New York City, it’s typical that a company will help you out with transportation by giving you a Metrocard to cover your trips to and from site; if they’re extra generous they’ll cover the entire month (which costs about $105 for an unlimited pass). Outside of NY, I’ve heard of many places offering reimbursements for gas to and from the workplace.

Unsubscribe from shopping e-mails: This one’s definitely a personal tip 🙂 Ever since I opted out of e-mails from websites like Gilt Groupe and Fab.com I haven’t found myself shopping online at all, which, let’s be honest, is a downfall for many of us. Getting rid of opportunities like that helps more than you think. Out of sight, out of mind…and nowhere near my wallet!

Jul16

Intern Spotlight: Kristen Higuera

DSC_0518Interviewee Name: Kristen Higuera

Intern Position Title: A&R/Marketing Intern

Company Name: A&M/Octone Records

Location: New York, New York

Tell us a bit about yourself:

I am going into my senior year at Texas A&M University pursuing a degree in Communications with a minor in art. Oh, and I really like music.

 

CreativeInterns: Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

Kristen Higuera: Lots and lots of research. With A&M/Octone, I had a phone interview then a Skype interview…and before I knew it I was on a plane headed to NYC.

CI: What attracted you to this company?

KH: A&M/Octone’s artist roster is extremely diverse. I felt that I could get a taste of what it is like to work with various genres instead of just one.

CI: What skills are you learning while at your internship?

KH: It is a very hands-on experience filled with brainstorming sessions and production meetings. I’m learning a lot about the logistics that go into keeping up with each and every artist signed to the label.

CI: Can you describe what a normal day is for an intern at your company?

KH: There really isn’t a “normal day” at the office and I love that. Everyday when I walk in at 10am, I never know what I might do or where I might be. I have gotten the chance to go on some really cool adventures to places like Jimi Hendrix’s Electric Lady Studios, Spotify, and MTV.

CI: How would you describe your workplace environment in three words or less?

KH: Laid back.

CI: What advice would you give to someone just DSC_0524starting to look for an internship?

KH: Decide what to be and go be it.

CI: What do you do to fill the inspiration gas tank?

KH: Nothing is more inspiring then an adventure with some swell tunes and good company.

CI: What’s next for you?

KH: We’ll see..

CI: What’s your dream job?

I am film and music enthusiast, so eventually I hope to find myself making the soundtracks for movies and TV shows.