Tag Archives: interview

Apr06

Student Excuses for being late

Train

Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to work with students in the capacity of a School Director, Director of Career Services and CEO of CreativeInterns.com. These positions often required students to either arrive on time for an appointment, interview or class and therefore enabled me to hear numerous reasons why students were late or just didn’t show up.

Over the past couple years, I started taking note of some of the more unique and often used excuses, truths and sometimes absurd flat-out lies that were told to me. I’ll leave it up to you to decide if these excuses were given in truth or to create empathy, shock or exemption from discipline for being late or not showing up. Enjoy!

Excuse #1

A homeless guy punched me because I was wearing a red hat.

Excuse #2

There was a really long line at the coffee shop.

Excuse #3

My shoe untied and I fell up the steps.

Excuse #4

There was fog and the ferry was delayed.

Excuse #5

My best friend was sick. (Note: can replace “best friend” with any living thing)

Excuse #6

I got my period.

Excuse #7

My train was delayed.

Excuse #8

I got lost.

Excuse #9

My alarm didn’t go off.

Excuse #10

I don’t know why I am late.

 

Written by: Marc Scoleri

Apr24

Intern Spotlight: Kailey Sibley

pName: Kailey Sibley

Intern Position Title: Social Media for CBC Olympics and Hockey Night in Canada

Company: CBC Sports

Location: Toronto

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

I’m a tiny sports fanatic living in downtown Toronto. I’ve recently finished the Radio & Television Arts program at Ryerson University, and am working my way into the world of sports broadcasting. I can tell you anything you need to know about the Stanley Cup, loose-leaf tea, and Orca Whales. I’m a huge fan of a good goal celebration, 4th-liner jerseys, and a solid playoff beard.

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

I actually applied to do a shot-listing internship for Hockey Night in Canada. I had to send in my resume and cover letter around four times before I was contacted for an interview. The interview was terrible. I was told I would never get to actually watch any sports during the internship because I’d be too busy getting coffee for people and running up and down the stairs. I asked if they had any writing and social media internships available. I was told no. A month later they asked me if I would do a writing and social media internship for the Olympics. I said yes, obviously.

What attracted you to this company?

CBC Sports is the pinnacle of sports broadcasting in Canada. I grew up watching Don Cherry and Ron MacLean on Hockey Night in Canada every Saturday night. The opportunity to be a part of the CBC Sports team during the Winter Olympics was too good to pass up.

What skills did you learn at your internship?

I now speak in 140-character bursts.

Could you describe what a typical day was like for you as an intern?

The Olympics were a crazy time on the CBC Sports floor. We had an awesome social media team working 24 hours a day, every day from Day -1 of the Olympics, to Day 16. As soon as I arrived for my 8 a.m. start, I was updating Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, and YouTube constantly. Covering hockey was my main focus. I would sit and watch every single game, live-tweeting them from one account on my phone and another on my laptop. I feel like I didn’t look up from my screen until the night shift arrived to take over social media duties!

What was the most challenging part?

The first time I tweeted a mistake. Everyone always says, “It’s okay to make mistakes.” When you’re representing a major corporation on social media, it isn’t okay to make mistakes. Always quadruple-check your work!

Most memorable moment?

Live-tweeting the men’s gold medal hockey game on the CBC Olympics and Hockey Night in Canada accounts. I literally skipped into work at 5 a.m. that morning. It was like Christmas for me. This is closely followed by the time I got to have a slice of Don Cherry’s birthday cake.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Exciting–there’s always something happening there.

What advice do you have for someone who is just starting to look for an internship?

Be persistent. Know everyone, and make sure everyone knows you. Never be that person everyone sees around but no one actually knows who you are. Offer to work on your days off. Dress for the job you want, not the one you have. Even if everyone else is in jeans, if your boss dresses up, you should too. Try not to yawn in front of your employers. Be enthusiastic about everything. Never apologize for doing your job. Triple-check your work…then check it again.

Who do you look up to in the industry?

My boss, Monika Platek. She does everything from writing, to social media, to on-air work. I swear she never sleeps.

What is your dream job?

Anything that involves talking about sports into a microphone.

Feb06

Intern Spotlight: Jacky Le

1797057_10153791614345725_818946895_nName: Jacky Le

Intern Position Title: Digital Intern

Company: FASHION Magazine

Location: Toronto/Vancouver

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

I’m a West Coast boy at heart raised in the yuppie and yogi-filled city of Vancouver. I kind of fell into writing and journalism during high school and eventually I cultivated a love for the fashion publishing industry, which has led me to relocate here in Toronto. I have a huge affinity for Beyonce, London fashion and pop culture, and I never shy away from a dance floor.

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

For FASHION I was able to land the internship with a good word from an editor at FLARE Magazine where I had interned prior. Honestly it’s all about who you know and leaving a good impression from the get-go, that can really determine what your next job will be. Also, I landed the FLARE internship after spotting a tweet from one of the editors. It truly shows the power that social media has in our generation.

What attracted you to this company?

In my opinion FASHION & FLARE are at the highest echelon in the fashion industry within Canada. I always believe it’s important to learn from the best so that obviously influenced my decision on where I wanted to intern.

What skills are you learning at your internship?

Digital and interactive media plays a huge part in the fashion publishing industry now. People always say digital is where things are heading and I slightly agree. Unlike print, the turnover rate for content is super fast paced so you always have to be on the ball and ready to product content, as well as know what is current and in the news.

What has been a highlight so far?

Getting to be an integral part of the team. And I get a kick out of seeing my name in the magazine masthead as well.

Most challenging part?

Learning that it’s okay to make mistakes. As an intern this is the time in your career where you should be making mistakes. Simply learn from them and make sure you never make those mistakes again in the future when you enter the real work field.

Could you describe what a typical day is like for you as an intern?

If I’m not skimming the internet or looking for pitches and buzz-worthy articles, I’m most likely working on an assigned post. As well, I’m scheduling tweets and Facebook posts for the ongoing days.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Fast-paced. I think that’s two? Oh well…haha.

What advice do you have for someone who is just starting to look for an internship?

Pick a magazine that you would ideally want to work for. Once you land that internship, chuck your ego and pride at the door and soak up as much information as you can. Be polite and always look as if you’re having the time of your life even when you’re not.

Who do you look up to in the industry?

Katie Grand, Nicola Formichetti , Derek Blasberg. As well as my former teacher Tyler Udall.

What is your dream job?

Senior editor at Vogue UK or W Magazine.  A boy can dream…

 

Jan28

Intern Spotlight: Jonathan Jackson

 

Screen Shot 2014-01-26 at 9.56.02 PMName: Jonathan Jackson

Intern Position Title: Social Media Editor

Company: TOPMAN Canada and Hudson’s Bay

Location: Toronto

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

Toronto native. Worked in retail since 2006 for Hudson’s Bay and H&M. Attending Ryerson in the Business Management program majoring in Global Management and minoring in Finance. I knew about the brand before Hudson’s Bay launched it in Canada so I jumped at the opportunity to transfer to the new location on Queen and move downtown in 2012. I then worked for the brand for a year before I pursued an internship.

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

The position had been posted in the back of the Topshop stock room for a solid month. After the position had been filled, I worked up the courage to send a detailed cover letter and resume asking to provide any help to the Marketing and Events Manager for Topshop/TOPMAN. I was called for an interview the next day in the afternoon and went in for an interview early that evening. On my way to another job I received an email asking to begin as soon as I could.

What attracted you to this company?

Strong company profile and market presence. I have worked for Hudson’s Bay for nearly 5 years now. Over these years I’ve witnessed first hand the changes the new board of directors have implemented and they are phenomenal. No other company in Canada has the history, the customer loyalty, and has been able to reinvent themselves so well to meet the needs of the Canadian consumer. These are key in companies that stand out to me when I look at where I want to be employed with in the future… Not to mention they just acquired Lord & Taylor!

What skills are you learning at your internship?

My boss has truly been inspirational in helping me to understand what an individual can achieve for a brand with social media marketing. She has helped me to keep cool and stay authentic to the brand when creating. Another skill I am learning to master is the art of editing. Less is always more in marketing so it’s key to make sure that what is being presented is clean and concise—most importantly COOL.

What has been a highlight so far?Screen Shot 2014-01-26 at 9.58.01 PM

I had the opportunity to implement, monitor and report on a national marketing campaign for TOPMAN during the Christmas season called TOPMAN After Hours. It was exciting to be able to facilitate it with little help and receive the reaction that we did on our social platforms. Another highlight would be on Black Friday. As Black Friday is heavily dependent on social media, a lot of pressure was placed on the interns to deploy the content provided from those above us at the right times and drive sales.

Most challenging part?

Time management. I now go to school full-time, intern, and work in a restaurant so I am always short for time. The challenge doesn’t seem so challenging though when you enjoy working with your team as much as I do!

Could you describe what a typical day is like for you as an intern?

Walk five minutes on Queen St. to the Simpson Tower. Whip my Mac open and start scoping out TOPMAN Generation (TOPMAN’s online magazine/also an app), check their Twitter, Instagram and Facebook to see what the head guys are doing back home in the England and in the US. Next I head downstairs to the store floor to snap a few shots of items, mannequins, and outfits that would be perfect for TOPMAN Canada. I then curate a Content Calendar using photos that other personal shoppers in TOPMAN locations across Canada and I have taken and create texts to accompany the shot. After a lot of editing and prayers, I either email my boss or we sit and go over everything. That is when the real learning happens.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Dynamic. While it looks like your standard office with no windows, women everywhere dressed in business casual attire and heels of course, the individuals working there are all full of life and truly have the goals of Hudson’s Bay at front of mind.

What advice do you have for someone who is just starting to look for an internship?

Be confident. Know what field you want to get into but don’t feel that you need to know exactly what you want in the future to gain knowledge from the internship. I was not sure about getting in to marketing but now that I have experience with a major corporation, I can see why the jobs are so attractive to business students.

What is your dream job?

I don’t really have a dream job. I just want to be able to do something that makes me happy and allows me to be just as content outside of work. Right now that would be to continue to work in marketing for an amazing company. Somewhere warm year-round would be ideal though!

Nov26

Get Involved On Campus

Amongst the hours you spend in classrooms listening to lectures and in the library buried in books, there is so much going on around campus that you might not be aware of. If you don’t take the time to see what’s out there, you could be missing out on some very cool and exciting opportunities. This goes for interning as well. In addition to searching for off-campus internships, getting involved on campus can be incredibly beneficial. Not only do you get to meet and collaborate with people who share your interests, but you also get the chance to learn valuable skills that you can take with you even after you graduate. We found a few students who are making the most of their time on campus. They shared their experiences with us and gave insight into what they’re learning along the way.

 

1394877_10200916929759878_601871716_nAndreia McLean, Wilfred Laurier University

“I am very actively involved in my campus’s Greek Life. Specifically in my own sorority, Alpha Phi, I serve on our executive board as the Panhellenic Delegate, bringing news from other sororities. I also oversee the recruitment process for all of the sororities on my campus.  I also serve on my campus’s Greek Council; a council of the Fraternities and Sororities on campus that cooperate to put on events to benefit different philanthropic initiatives, as well as socials to help unify us as a collective.

I’ve served in many different positions throughout my four years at Laurier, mostly in the recruitment or event planning departments, but this year has been my most involved. The skills I have learned in each of these roles are invaluable in the real working world. Recruitment has taught me how to sell anything from a product, to a group of people, to a lifestyle. And planning socials for the entire Greek Life community on my campus has taught me how to organize on a large scale, work with many different people, and plan and execute a successful large scale event. The skills I have learned through my leadership roles in Alpha Phi, Panhellenic, and Greek Council will be a great assist in finding, maintaining, and thriving in a working position after university.”

 

Raeniel Holgado, Simon Fraser University1420338_10153459231115328_1100437799_n

“At SFU, I am heavily involved with Enactus SFU. Enactus is a student-run organization that creates several entrepreneurial-driven projects to tackle various social issues within the community. In particular, I project manage a financial literacy program called “Count on Me”, which instills basic financial literacy skills to youth at-risk to inspire them to build a more sustainable future.

As a Project Manager, I learned a lot about managing a team and to hold every single member accountable. Another key take-away from my experience being a project lead is that time is your worst enemy. Hence, it’s pertinent to set S.M.A.R.T. goals to ensure you accomplish tasks in a timely fashion.”

 

Sam RNTS PicSam Sim, Ryerson University

“I’m involved in the Ted Rogers Management Conference (TRMC), Ryerson University Finance Society (RUFS) and the Ryerson Speech & Debate Association (RSDA). This year I’ve really gotten involved in the business community at Ryerson, especially with student groups. I’ve learned so much about marketing, management, team building and strategy from working on these teams. These are all skills you can’t just learn from reading a textbook. It’s much more effective to put them into practice.

There are so many other areas and industries I can take my journalism degree, besides just being a reporter. My interest ultimately lies in business and so being a part of these groups is not only allowing me to pick up useful business skills I can put on my resume, but an opportunity to explore all different industries to see what I’m passionate about.”

Nov05

Career Path Interview: Online Fashion Features Editor Julia Rubin

38-julia-rubin-photojennamariewakani

Julia Rubin is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and now works as the Associate Online Editor for Fashion Features at Teen Vogue. She gives insight into her internship experiences and shares some advice for students hoping to break into the ever-growing fashion industry.

During college, where did you gain internship experience?

I interned every summer in college. I interned at Yves Saint Laurent in New York for my first two summers and I was in the creative services/visual merchandising department. We were responsible for anything visual that was not designing the clothes, so that was the window displays, general store curation, what events looked like, and it was great. I loved it, but I knew I wanted to try something else. So that third summer, I spent half the week interning at Chanel in the communications department and the other half in sales and marketing at Phaidon, which is a publisher, and they have lots of really cool art and fashion and food books. I did those internships when I was in school and was always in New York, but knew that none of them were totally the right fit. During the school year, I worked for the arts and culture magazine at school, kind of like The Village Voice for Penn. So I worked there since the first day of school and rose through the ranks and eventually was the Editor-In-Chief. In my junior year I started up the campus blog. It was great. It was the point when I realized I loved writing, loved editing, and loved the Internet. Even though I interned in fashion, I was much more interested in media, and because of my background in fashion, it was easy to put the two together and start off as a fashion writer and editor.

What was the most important thing you learned from interning?

I just really loved that as an intern, you’re an observer. I’ve always been really interested in seeing how groups of people work, what structures are like, how everything works, and all the nitty gritty stuff. In terms of general skills, just seeing that the people who were the happiest were the people who were really really into what they did. That’s how my team was at YSL for example. They were all so obsessed with all the visual stuff; they lived it and breathed it. So I wanted to find something that I felt that way about because that’s why they were so good at their jobs. That’s ultimately what led me to realizing that my passion was writing and editing.

What was the most challenging part along the way during the job hunt when you were fresh out of school?

For me, the hardest thing was coming to terms with the fact that I wanted to be a writer and editor. This is a pretty difficult industry and it can be a trying thing on a personal level. So just deciding that I was going to do it and diving in head first, was definitely the scariest.

How did you land a job at Teen Vogue?

My first job out of school was with a fashion news site called Styleite. I was there for two years and I started out as an intern and was promoted a few different times. By the time I left, I was the managing editor of the site. In my first year at Styleite, I received an email from a web editor at Teen Vogue. It was really the coolest email I’ve ever gotten. She told me that she read my stuff on Styleite and she really liked my article on Karlie Kloss. We ended up keeping in touch, helping each other out and having a professional email relationship. A year later, I got an email from her saying that there was a position opening on the web team that she thought I’d be perfect for and her boss would be reaching out. And she did. The rest is history.

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

July was a very exciting month for me because a bunch of crazy things all happened at once. This was all within a matter of weeks, which was insane. I went to Berlin for a Selena Gomez event, which was really cool because I had never travelled anywhere, much less internationally, for work. That was super cool. Then I came back and found out that a feature story I had written for the magazine was green lit for an upcoming issue so I was hurrying to get that all together. It was super exciting because this was the first print story I had in the magazine and it was about teenage heroin use, which is a really crazy and important topic to cover right now. So I had to put the finishing touches on that. Also, Teen Vogue launched its video channel and I was able to be in one of the videos.  I don’t think I’m particularly good on camera but I was very flattered and really excited with how it all turned out. So it was cool to be able to do so many different things and it was very much a realization of how multi-faceted it is being at a magazine. Even though I’m on digital, I write lots of stories for the website but am still able to write for the magazine and work with video, so it was very cool to see all that come together and be a part of it.

What advice do you have for students hoping to get into this industry?

What I did was reach out to people I had some sort of connection to and really respected. The connection can be small. Reach out to people who are not total strangers and keep up with those people. Figuring out what you even like is also really important and just looking around. I found my first job from a tweet. A friend of the woman who became my boss told me to get in touch with her. It’s all just weird things like that. Always be open. Also don’t feel like you have to say yes. If you get a job opportunity that comes your way and you know that you’re not going to be happy there, don’t take it. If you genuinely think this is not something you want to do and you just want to say yes to end the job search, that’s not great. Wait until something comes along that could be an opportunity for you and a good launching point. Even if it ends up being something you don’t like, that’s okay too. Don’t be afraid to change direction. That’s okay. Get out as soon as you can. Life is too short.

Where do you see yourself in the next few years?

I think that what I’ll ultimately do, or continue to do, probably doesn’t exist right now. When I started college, the job that I had by the time I graduated did not exist. It just didn’t. When I graduated high school in 2006, the idea that you could be a paid writer and editor on the Internet, writing about fashion, going to all the same events that the print editors were going to, it was just unheard of. Those jobs just did not exist and if they did, they were very few and far between. My job at Teen Vogue didn’t exist until I started there. So I kind of have to imagine that what I do next doesn’t exist yet. The media industry is something that is just rapidly changing and the digital world really is expanding. I tell anyone who is looking to be a journalist now that there actually are more opportunities because magazine website staff keep growing and web-only places have fully fleshed-out mastheads now, which is great. I find it really encouraging.

Sep03

Career Path to Becoming a Freelance Graphic Designer: Interview with David Jacob Duke

David DukeInterviewee Name: David Jacob Duke

Job Title: Freelance Graphic/Web Designer & Illustrator

Company URL: http://www.davidjacobduke.com

David Jacob Duke is from Windsor, Ontario and attended the Windsor Centre for the Creative Arts (WCCA) during his secondary schooling. The program had just begun and only accepted students who showed a propensity for artistic endeavours and offered an enriched course in Visual and Performance Arts.  There David studied traditional painting, printmaking, illustration, sculpture, fashion illustration, musical theatre, drama and video.

At the early age of 17, David first showed his ambitious entrepreneurial nature when he opened his first business, a comic book store. While not yet old enough to own a store outright, it was in his father’s name yet with a Power of Attorney, which granted him full control. It was a short lived venture as David had decided to study Traditional Animation at Sheridan College. At that time the school was world renown and had the reputation of ‘producing the best animators in the field’. During the second year Duke left the program due to external issues which needed his attention.

In the year 2000, David was residing in Toronto, Ontario. He had purchased his first computer and found himself intrigued by the creation of webpages. He began learning HTML and Web Design through viewing source files online, and dissecting them in notepad. He began to experiment with hand coding and began learning these new languages or ‘code’. His intention at the time was to be able to showcase his artwork on the internet and be able to reach a worldwide audience. David’s ever-growing skill in web design got noticed fast and lead to his building sites for others, and eventually evolved to working with and for companies.

David’s capacity for web design grew and became more diverse in order to meet the ever-changing needs and specifications of the clientele. As David refined his skills he found that he was also beginning to be approached for work with print media. Over the next few years, David completed numerous projects for several companies while working freelance, and in some cases directly employed on contract. His passion for Illustration however, still continued and has resulted in many of David’s works being published as covers and interior artwork.

In 2009, Canada was in the midst of a full scale recession. Duke decided to return to school to formally study Graphic Design at St. Clair College. There he excelled, achieving a 4.0 Grade Point Average and receiving several scholarships and awards.

Recently graduated, Duke maintains a steady flow of freelance work in graphic, web design and illustration. He prides himself on his ability to be versatile and able to achieve any style necessary.

Tell us about an internship or volunteer experience you completed that was related to your field during or after college?

I have only had the one internship, and that was mandatory for completion of my Graphic Design degree. The internship was at HCA| Mindbox, an advertising agency. I was accepted there due to my experience. They wanted someone that would not have to be guided every step of the way. An internship is meant to place you in a real world experience in your chosen field. There you should learn if you have what it takes to excel and be successful within the industry. Due to my previous years of experience working in the industry, I did not learn the fundamentals I could have from an internship, but I did learn many important skills. I studied and observed the daily operations of the agency as a whole, and began to understand the operations in the context of a network. This gave me an unique opportunity to experience and comprehend what it takes for an advertising agency to succeed.

What advanced education, online training or development programs would you recommend for people interested in becoming a Graphic Designer?

I do not know what the courses are like all over the world, but I would strongly suggest that anyone interested in Graphic Design study as much multi-media as you can. Many Graphic Design programs, I feel do not focus enough on this based on what is required or asked of for an entry level position in Graphic Design. I believe that there is too much focus on print at this point. While I would not want to take away the print experience of learning to work in print, there needs to be more balanced training to reflect the needs of the industry.

Knowing what you know now, what would you do differently while in undergraduate studies?

I can only state that one possibility would have been to study Graphic Design earlier in life, but in doing so I may have ended on a completely different path by now.

What specifically motivated you to go this direction in your career?

Serendipitous events that fell in place like dominos led me down the road that I travel now. I started off as a traditional animator, which led to coding and designing websites to showcase my illustration work, which led to graphic design which is where I am at this point: designing, coding, illustrating, animating and eventually in a few years I want to start educating.

What type of activities, appointments and meetings do you have during a typical week? 

Typically, I have a few meetings a month with clients. Usually this consists of an information session to lay out what is needed, or brainstorm possible solutions. Mostly though, with long term clients a phone call, or even just conversing through email is enough to sort through things and start working.

In addition to your full-time career, do you freelance, consult or have your own business?

If yes, please share any information you’d like readers to know.  Currently right now I’ve moved into just freelancing. Most companies now only hire on contract, and I myself would rather work remotely and be able to pick and chose the work I want to do. Full time freelance is not for the feint of heart. You must be extremely well organized and diligent with your own work schedule. I actually love to work and feel a great sense of accomplishment by doing work, so my days are generally longer than most. When there is downtime, and either no work or not very much work, spend that time investing in yourself. Learn new things and skills, make personal projects that you can pick up wherever you leave off, and spend time networking and promoting.

Tell us about an unpleasant work experience that resulted in an invaluable career lesson?

Do not be afraid to fire a bad client. We have all had them, and if not then one will eventually cross your path. Bad clients take up a lot of time and energy that you could be using to move forward. They can be unethical, unprofessional, unwilling to pay on time (or at all), or just very unpleasant to work with. Fire them and move on.

What tips can you offer a recent graduate that is preparing to interview for an entry-level position within your industry?

When I have entered interviews for entry-level positions I have always found that it is best to treat the people or person that is interviewing you like old friends that you have not seen in years. Tell them what you have been up to relative to what it is they are hiring you for. Do not be afraid to laugh or show your true self, as not only are they will be looking to see if you have the skills they need, but also that you will be well suited to work with the company. After everyone is comfortable, make sure to ask questions to see if what they are doing and what they want you to do suits your expectations. An interview is not only about them, it is about if you want the job and it is right for you.

What piece of advice do you wish you followed earlier in your career?

Do it for yourself. A large chunk of my life was spent trying make sure that everyone else was okay before myself.  It was a long hard lesson to learn in life.

If you were hiring someone for your position, what five skills would you require in all applicants?

  1. Taking initiative, I would not want anyone that needs to be babysat every step of the way.
  2. Laid back and easygoing.  Being comfortable with yourself and able to separate your work from yourself.
  3. Versatile, the ability to not only shift gears among the many hats you need to wear but also the ability to emulate a variety of styles whenever called upon.
  4. Strong skills in graphic design software such as Adobe Creative Suite.
  5. A thirst to continue to expand and learn.

Who has inspired you as a mentor during your career and what was the most valuable lesson you learned from them?

A mentor, you mean like Yoda?  I have to say, I never have had a mentor. I’ve always been of the mind-set to just get out there and do it. Take charge of your own future and teach yourself.

If you had an opportunity to broadcast a special “thank you” to anyone via this interview, who would it be and what would you like us to say?

I like to express a big shout out to all the bad clients I have had over the years to prepare me for the stage I am at now.

What online resource do you read on a regular basis to get industry news and knowledge?

Truthfully, when I have the time I simply just log into LinkedIn and scan through articles that I have tailored to my interests. When a particular article strikes me I branch off by “googling” points of interest that lead me to further information on the subject.

What design books would you recommend for upcoming designers?

A book that I read recently while on a trip to Ottawa for the Van Gogh exhibit was “Damn Good Advice (for people with talent!) by America’s Master Communicator George Lois”.  The book is written with 120 in-your-face examples to uncover your creative potential.

What industry trend has recently peaked your personal interests and why?

One trend that I see is beginning to grab hold is the use of SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) for graphics.  I’ve been very keen on starting to learn and implement this in my own work and can envision doing so more when designing graphics or illustrations in the future. With the evolution of responsive design, SVG is a valuable solution as a file can be used at any scale and resolution. SVG retains crisp clear graphics at any size.

 

Aug20

Sharing Wisdom: Finding Career Inspiration

As students who are on your journey towards finding a long-lasting career and landing the jobs of your dreams, it’s always reassuring to see others who are doing exactly what you hope to accomplish someday—or at least something similar. Having something or someone to keep you motivated and driven is beneficial in the long run because you’ll always strive for more and it’s that extra push that can help set yourself apart from the rest. We wanted to see where some students find their own career inspiration and get insight into what keeps them going in the right direction.

 

ErikaGrahamErika Graham, Asbury University

“This is kind of weird, but I find career inspiration through my social media accounts (Instagram especially). I use social media to get a glimpse into the lives of people whose jobs I want to have, and what they do on a day-to-day business. Since I want to get into the magazine industry, I follow all the editors at all of my favorite magazines—not just the famous ones like Nina Garcia or Joe Zee, but the closet assistants and editorial assistants as well. You’d be surprised at how many tips you can pick up from Instagrammed shots of an associate market editor’s visual inspiration board or seeing what news catches their eye on Twitter.”

 

Tere Cortes, University of Texas Pan AmericanTereCortes

“I find career inspiration from a lot of different sources. From my friends, to people who I work with. I try to ask as many questions as possible, to learn different perspectives of something. I also try to read interviews and advice from people who have already the job of their dreams.”

 

 

EricZaworskiEric Zaworski, Ryerson University

“The constant flux of the Internet, and the sheer amount of people online who have started careers with it makes it hard for me to concentrate on much else. I follow so many other writers, photographers and musicians who, thanks to the Internet, have made it possible to do what they love, find others who like what they’re doing and build tangible communities, networks and careers there.

The communicative power and reach of the Internet–the ability to share, post, connect and discover, all from a pocket-sized device–makes it an exciting time to be an artist, in any capacity. And we’ve only begun to scratch the surface of what’s possible! That makes it the most exciting part.

I’m inspired by others online who have shaped their reality with the same tools I have on my desk and in my bedroom. It’s what keeps me motivated to continually push towards what I want to make out of my life.”

 

Jessica Tucker, Memorial University of NewfoundlandJessicaTucker

“I take the industries I have an interest in and learn as much as I can about them, immersing myself if possible. I am particularly inspired by successful people in these fields and read bio pieces about them in newspapers and magazines and follow them on social media platforms to gain a better understanding of what their day-to-day careers are like. I am also inspired by my friends. I think that surrounding yourself with genuine, hardworking individuals is a source of career inspiration in itself.”

 

 

SaraCastillo

Sara Castillo, University of Texas Pan American

“I always find career inspiration by reading the stories of successful people in my field. It is really interesting to hear how those people accomplished their goals by going from having nothing to finding their dream jobs. Makes me feel that I can create my own story as well and gives me motivation to overachieve, to find ways to be more involved in my career and to not settle with little things but to always aim higher. I believe that inspiration comes from your passion and how bad you want it.”

 

Screen Shot 2013-08-20 at 12.06.43 AM

Christina Dawes, The Ohio State University

“I find career inspiration from a variety of different sources. My instructors and favorite bloggers have helped shape and define my career aspirations. My peers have also inspired me with their fresh, innovative perspective on fashion. With the fashion industry forever growing, there are new job positions being created each day. My career path is inspired by the dynamic people who are using passion and originality to create their dream jobs.”

Jul30

Intern Spotlight: Hilary Taylor

DSC_0049Interviewee Name: Hilary Taylor

Intern Position Title: Planning Intern for AnnTaylor.com

Company Name: ANN Inc.

Location: New York City, NY

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

As a fourth year Retail Management student at Ryerson University, I have worked from the retail floor to the head office, soaking up every learning opportunity along the way. I am a passionate and driven student who is inspired by being told that something isn’t possible, or that I can’t do it. Hearing those words heightens my motivation and pushes me to my limits. Retail is what excites me, but I’m someone who finds happiness in accomplishments. I love finding a great deal while I’m shopping, running for an extra minute or mile, working that much harder. My passion for retail expands past the classroom, as I am the president of the Retail Students Association next year, and returning back to work at LOFT in the Eaton Center when I get back to Toronto. My eagerness to learn sets me apart from my peers, and I am continuously searching for new books to read, articles to share, advice to take and experiences to embrace that will further me in my career and my character.

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

ANN Inc. actually came to Ryerson and did a presentation about the internship for fashion and retail students. After the presentation I approached one of the presenters and told her how amazing the opportunity seemed, that she’d be hearing from me and gave her my business card (and now that I know her well she said I made a good impression by doing that and she remembered me). The application was pretty extensive (it was offered on the ANNLOFT careers page) and I worked with our career counselor to perfect my resume. A recruiter from ANN actually called me to set up an interview before I submitted my application and to this day I’m not sure how they got my phone number without my application (it’s not on my business card!) — but we set up an interview, I submitted my application and completed my interview via Skype. A few days later, they called me and said I got the job! I then had to complete a bunch of visa paperwork and try to find an affordable apartment in NYC, which turned out to be a more difficult task than the actual application. For the month of May I offered to work at LOFT in Yorkdale (this was something I offered during the interview process to set myself apart from other applicants) in order to get a taste of the company culture, and a better taste of the Canadian market: a job to which I will be returning in September.

What attracted you to this company?Screen Shot 2013-07-30 at 11.08.14 AM

ANN Inc. has a great company culture. It’s all about women understanding women, and creating product for women. I really liked that and it is definitely something that I can relate to. Internships in retail planning are also very hard to come by in Canada so I jumped at the opportunity—and obviously the location played a big part in the decision!

What skills are you learning while at your internship?

I have learned so many things during my time in NYC and at ANN Inc, both personal and professional. I’ve learned a lot about working with people, and when to keep my mouth shut! I have learned so much about the retail business and how customers can tell you so much about the positives and negatives of your business. My excel and math skills have definitely improved as well.

Can you describe what a normal day is for an intern at your company?

I work a LOT on excel! A LOT! I consistently work on mini projects, analyzing metrics to make business decisions. For example, I will look at current under-performing products (based on retail metrics like stock to sales, inventory count and gross margin) and decide on appropriate markdowns. I am in charge of keeping the team up to date on certain metrics that change every day and updating certain methods of communication. I also update several spreadsheets where we are testing different things and how the customers react. For example, we test different “free shipping” amounts to see which amount the customer resonates with best. I sit in on really interesting meetings with company executives, which is a really great experience to be able to watch them in action. The internship program hosts lunch and learns, where we hear from one company executive at a time about their experiences and advice for us entering the workforce. We are also working on a project with other interns so I am in charge of creating short term and long term plans for our new business and forecasting dollar and unit sales. All of these things make up a typical day!

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Feminine.

What advice would you give to someone just starting to look for an internship?

Show your eagerness to learn and your passion will also shine. One common piece of advice I’ve heard is that your passion shines through when you’re not trying to show it (or else it comes off fake). Also, don’t be afraid to set yourself apart. Yes, it may be awkward going up after a presentation to hand over your business card, or to speak up about something that is unique about you, but that’s what makes you memorable and brings you to the top of the list for possible hires.

What do you do to fill the inspiration gas tank?

I have a blog full of pictures that I find all over the Internet. If I had the time I’d love to have a blog with pictures that I’ve taken…but maybe when school is done. The pictures are of outfits that I love, and that I think encompass my style. I love seeing new ideas of ways to wear the clothes I already have! I also love quotes and song lyrics. I’m one of those girls that writes every single quote and lyric down that connects with me and any time I’m having a bad day or just looking for a little pick-me-up, I go back to that list.

What’s next for you?

I return to Toronto in three weeks and start getting ready for school! I am the president of the Retail Students association at my school this year, so I am already starting to get ready for a crazy year. I’m hoping to move into a job in retail planning or allocation when I graduate. My ideal places to work would be Winners or HBC, but who knows! I may end up back in NYC.

What’s your dream job?

My dream is to become the CEO of a large retail company (like Bonnie Brooks!) but to move up at a company through the buying/merchandising path. I’d love to be a DMM (divisional merchandise manager) and oversee the bigger picture of buying for shoes, accessories or handbags. (I’m an accessories girl all the way!)

Jul16

Intern Spotlight: Kristen Higuera

DSC_0518Interviewee Name: Kristen Higuera

Intern Position Title: A&R/Marketing Intern

Company Name: A&M/Octone Records

Location: New York, New York

Tell us a bit about yourself:

I am going into my senior year at Texas A&M University pursuing a degree in Communications with a minor in art. Oh, and I really like music.

 

CreativeInterns: Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

Kristen Higuera: Lots and lots of research. With A&M/Octone, I had a phone interview then a Skype interview…and before I knew it I was on a plane headed to NYC.

CI: What attracted you to this company?

KH: A&M/Octone’s artist roster is extremely diverse. I felt that I could get a taste of what it is like to work with various genres instead of just one.

CI: What skills are you learning while at your internship?

KH: It is a very hands-on experience filled with brainstorming sessions and production meetings. I’m learning a lot about the logistics that go into keeping up with each and every artist signed to the label.

CI: Can you describe what a normal day is for an intern at your company?

KH: There really isn’t a “normal day” at the office and I love that. Everyday when I walk in at 10am, I never know what I might do or where I might be. I have gotten the chance to go on some really cool adventures to places like Jimi Hendrix’s Electric Lady Studios, Spotify, and MTV.

CI: How would you describe your workplace environment in three words or less?

KH: Laid back.

CI: What advice would you give to someone just DSC_0524starting to look for an internship?

KH: Decide what to be and go be it.

CI: What do you do to fill the inspiration gas tank?

KH: Nothing is more inspiring then an adventure with some swell tunes and good company.

CI: What’s next for you?

KH: We’ll see..

CI: What’s your dream job?

I am film and music enthusiast, so eventually I hope to find myself making the soundtracks for movies and TV shows.