Tag Archives: internship

Sep07

Advice for Internships By Samantha Lauro

Samantha Lauro

You Were Chosen For a Reason:

Every person has the quintessential, “I don’t know what I am doing” feeling when they start a new job. It is only natural, as you’re in a completely new environment consisting of client approval rather than grade percentiles. There will definitely be moments that challenge you and even make you question your chosen career path. Your most important asset is how the anxiety is managed, as what ultimately defines the situation is the end result. Therefore look at the long run rather than getting caught up in the moment.

Morning Routine:

I suggest treating yourself to a coffee, or general beverage/snack, at least once a week to keep your mornings interesting. This especially goes for those who commute; not only does it expose you to new locations around the city, but it also takes the mindlessness out of the daily routine. I am a self-proclaimed, or self-diagnosed, caffeine addict so to me this is essential.

What to Wear: 

Attire is important. It is the first impression people have of you and sets the tone. The rule of thumb is usually, dress a level beyond the position you are aiming for. I concur, but my personal thought is that one must gage the social climate and dress appropriately. In other words, integrate yourself with the office culture but maintain a professional appearance. If your place of work is on the casual side, I recommend mixing professional and dressed down pieces to keep the balance.

Going to a Work Event:

This is a great opportunity to get to know co-workers. Be social and make connections. It may be intimidating but I have found most people to be open and friendly, plus casual conversation is a great way to gain insight on the field you are embarking in. Be yourself and be genuine; at the end of the day a real relationship is far more important than a list of completed office tasks or superficial conversation. Enjoy yourself!

Stay Off Your Phone:

To become fully involved and connected with jobs and accounts one should avoid distractions. Put the phone down and get the full experience. Use 100% of your mental capacity and it will pay off with regard to work quality and work relationships.

Junior Associate Mentality:

Think of yourself as a junior associate rather than an intern. People will tell you not to sweat it because “you are only an intern” but I say rise to the occasion. Don’t give yourself a proverbial out. You are working at a real company and the work you do will have an impact in some way, especially if you elevate your thinking.

Meetings:

Pay attention to details and take notes. Observe and absorb the general information and the essence of the gathering. Note the interaction, strategy, attitude, posture, and language. There are so many external and intrinsic lessons to learn, as meetings show thought process, culture, and final result. Always have an opinion about what is being said, and try to contribute when appropriate. You never know when you will be asked about your thoughts, therefore, listening intently is key. Additionally, ask questions to show that you are attentive and interested in learning. If you are nervous ask questions after the meeting or through a follow up email.

When in Doubt, Go for It:

There will be quite a few times during an internship where the opportunity to go beyond what is expected presents itself. Many times it means putting oneself on the line or taking a chance. Admittedly, this is pretty scary especially in a new place. Personal examples of this included emailing my thoughts on an account after sitting in on a meeting, creating a POV, presenting an idea to an art director, and asserting my opinion despite the fact that it challenged the idea of another co-worker. Before every decision I contemplated whether or not I should act, and I went for it. I can say with confidence that it was worth it, as each became a personal victory despite varying degrees of success. Take a chance on yourself, it will pay off and show initiative.

Don’t be Afraid to Stay Late:

Staying late can be daunting. If there comes a time where you need to stay late to get something done embrace it; buckle down and get to work. You want to show your team that you are dependable and dedicated, therefore don’t run out of the office at 5:00pm on the dot. In the process of staying late you may even meet some coworkers who you would not have met during the day. Additionally, if you are working on a project for someone, always check with them before you head out for the day.

Commuting:

Commuting is exhausting and can be mind-numbing. A good percentage of the time I was passed out on LIRR, but for the days when my mind was left wandering I often searched for a way to pass the time. I suggest making a playlists to keep it fun; good music makes every situation better. I also recommend podcasts, as they are a great way to wake up your mind for the workday.

Time Management:

One will quickly realize that time is fleeting, especially if there is an abundance of work to be done. Stay on top of your work and things will run smoothly. Additionally, quality is essential so do not rush through your tasks at hand. It can be hard to say no to projects when multiple people come to you for help at the same time. If you think you can handle more work then go for it, but do not take on more responsibility if quality of work will suffer. It helps to know deadlines and be open; ask your supervisors when things are due and create an open dialogue. Lastly, keep a schedule to keep track of jobs.

Carry a Notebook:

I am a firm believer in carrying a notebook at all times during an internship. You can record what is going on, keep track of work and information, and have a daily account of your internship experience. It is also great for writing down ideas when inspiration strikes.

Work Quality:

Quality on one task can determine whether people will come to you for other jobs. Put in maximum effort. Also, do not be afraid to ask questions, as an internship should be about developing your skills.

Be Hungry:

An internship is a learning experience. Strive to learn as much as possible, and experience all that you can. Ask to attend meetings, look for work, volunteer, and enquire about opinions. Be assertive, in a mature way, and you shall receive.

Think Outside of the Box:

Creative thinking is valuable. As an outsider you do not have preconceived notions/stigmas from the industry and are not assimilated to the general way of thinking. Moreover, you hold a fresh perspective and come from a place of different experiences. Use this to your benefit and go against the grain. Also, some of the most wacky and outrageous ideas can be the best, or at the very least can stimulate thought, so make sure to speak up.

End of Internship:

Meet with your supervisor one last time before you leave to debrief. It can be a great way to gain valuable feedback on your performance and can showcase your progress. Be sure to thank your supervisor, as graciousness goes a long way.

 

Mar10

7 Tips for actors going to audition

Acting

An audition for an actor can be the first step to getting that dream job or role. There are often nerves, anticipation, that knot in the stomach and the lying in bed the night before wondering if this is going to be their big break. Whether it’s an audition to get into that prestigious theatre school, for a commercial, a speaking line in a TV show or as an extra in a movie, here are our 7 tips for actors going to an audition.

Always take your picture and CV

That photo could be what makes them remember you amongst all the other auditionees. You don’t want the producer racking his brain to remember your name and not having a photo to jog his memory. Even if your CV only includes school plays get it on there.  Any experience is good experience in the acting world especially when you are trying to get into theatre school with view to making a career from acting.

Don’t make excuses

Producers don’t care if you’ve got cold, have a hangover or your dog has died. You will be expected to be on set or on stage whatever life throws at you; the show must go on in its most literal form. Turning up looking as if you have just rolled out of bed is an instant black mark, whatever the reason they don’t want to know it so make an effort.

Bring the 3 C’s along

Charisma, comfort and confidence.  As an actor you must command attention. You must be the most important person in a 1000 seat theatre; the one nobody can drag their eyes away from. You have to also be somebody that we all want to get to know better. If you are able to do that as a person you will also be capable of doing it as a character.

Make a choice when asked to make one

Many producers will ask an actor to choose from a choice of 2 or 3 monologues, or from 2 or 3 songs. Do not give a cheeky smile and respond with “surprise me”. The producer wants to see that you can make decisions and have reasoning behind it. Imagine it in this scenario. You choose to portray a character in a certain way and the producer wants to know what has driven you to make that decision, what has attracted you to playing that way. An insight into your character gives a producer an insight into what type of actor you are.

The early bird catches the worm

Never ask for the last audition spot of the day under the misapprehension that the last is the most memorable. By this time the entire team will be tired, grumpy and looking forward to going home. Stats from any of the London school of musical theatre courses we asked suggests that it is the earliest that get the call back as they make their impression when the producer is at his or her most receptive. Roll in at the end of the day and they will barely even acknowledge you are there.

Up to date contact details

Even if you are lucky enough to have an agent make sure you have personal contact details on your CV. Agents are busy people, and if that email inviting you back for a second audition the next morning lands in their inbox after they have left the office and are halfway through their second bottle of wine you could have missed out on your big chance. All actors are recommended to have a separate phone number and email address for work purposes.

Audition for everything

Do not be precious and think anything is beneath you. The more you audition the better you manage to control those nerves, train your mind to memorise lines and build your confidence.

 

May28

Career Spotlight: Michele Weisman of Likeable Media

Michele Weisman

Right before Memorial Weekend started, we had the opportunity to chat with Michele Weisman, PR & Social Media Manager at Likeable Media. Yes, @ottogrl! As you wine down from the weekend festivities, catch our interview recap and what it is like to work at a social media agency.

Creative Interns: What is a typical day for a PR & Social Media manager at a growing social media agency?

Michele Weisman: I’m a team of one and Likeable Media is a fast-paced and fast-growing company. I follow a yearly Marketing Plan with activities each month, but sometimes new tasks may come up. My typical duties include:

  • Creating daily content and monitoring Likeable Media’s communities on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and various social media networks.
  • Brainstorm and manage content for the company blog. Posts are published daily.
  • Establish and deepen the agency’s relationships with journalists, event programmers and brand marketers.
  • Book guests and help market the podcast, “All the Social Ladies,” hosted by Carrie Kerpen, Likeable Media’s CEO.
  • Founder and moderator of the agency’s weekly Twitter chat, #LikeableChat
  • Working closely with the sales team to help create content, such as eBooks, white papers and webinars to generate leads.

Last week, I launched “Shut Up and Listen,” a social listening e-book (available for download at likeableaudits.com) and I worked with the agency’s Creative and New Business teams to assist with the launch.

CI: What made you choose a career path in social media and digital communications?

MW: In 2008, I discovered Likeable Media during my sophomore year at Syracuse University (GO ORANGE!). A Facebook ad that was describing their internship program led me to a Facebook group (at the time, you could only post Facebook ads via a group) called theKbuzz. Likeable Media used to be called theKbuzz before being rebranded in May 2010. Since I already secured my sophomore summer internship, I applied to intern at Likeable Media one year later. I landed the position and at that time I had no idea of social media’s business implications.

After I completed the summer internship, Dave Kerpen asked me to be his executive assistant while I was still a senior at Syracuse. Once I graduated, I was offered the executive assistant position with a full-time offer. Likeable Media and its co-founders, Dave and Carrie Kerpen, have taught me everything I know about social media. I fell in love with the industry and the constant innovation and creativity. It’s amazing how you could be connected with anyone. It’s a fast-paced industry and it is such an exciting time to work in the social media industry.

CI: For news and updates in social media, what are your go-to resources and websites?

MW: I read a lot! I love LinkedIn Pulse. They have a ton of great content on there from LinkedIn influencers, connections and more. I also read Mashable, Ad Age, NY Times, Fast Company, Ragan, Buzzfeed, Inc. and Forbes. I also have different twitter lists to keep up with what my followers are tweeting about. Twitter is the main app I use.

CI: What is your most memorable moment at Likeable?

MW: Back in 2012, we put on a one-day conference called LikeableU. We had 400 attendees and 100+ speakers ranging from Peter Shankman, Jeffrey Hayzlett, Aliza Licht (@DKNY), Jeff Pulver and Frank Eliason. We also had representatives from brands including Red Mango, New York Times, CNN, Chobani, Twitter, Warby Parker, MLB, Cisco, LinkedIn, Hubspot, ESPN, Meetup, GetGlue, StumbleUpon and Eventbrite. I’m very passionate about event planning and really enjoy the process of putting together a big event.

CI: Give us one word to describe the corporate culture at Likeable. 

MW: It may sound cliche but we are likeable. Staying true to its belief that it pays to be likeable, the agency is committed to creating a more likeable world by providing an entrepreneurial environment that is both rewarding and challenging for employees. Recent activities include potluck meals, food drives, forums, retreats, sport recreational teams, field days and professional development trainings. I’m lucky and fortunate to work in an environment that allows me to grow professionally.

CI: What advice would you give students looking to enter your field or even work at your company?

MW: The best advice I can give is to always be nice to people. You never know when you will need someone’s expertise or when you will want someone to introduce you to a particular person. Make sure that when people help you, you can help others as well. Paying it forward is always good. In addition, don’t be afraid to network. We live in a world where everyone is on the Internet, so try to use your social networks effectively!

To connect with Michele Weisman further, follow her on Twitter at @ottogrl.

 

May05

Landing The Job: Marie Alcober

1098038_10153178729605160_2066378516_nOnce you land your dream internship, where do you go from there? Many students take on internships with the hopes of coming out with a job. Although it’s never a guarantee, there’s always opportunity to put yourself out there and get noticed. Recent Ryerson University journalism graduate Marie Alcober shares insight into how she went from an intern to a web producer at the Business News Network (BNN).

Tell us a bit about yourself:

I’m a curious, fly-by-the-seat-off-my-pants kind of girl. I don’t shy away from new things and I’m not afraid to admit that I know very little. That’s what’s so great about the journalism industry. I get the opportunity to meet smart people and learn from their expertise everyday.

How did you first land your internship with BNN?

To be able to graduate, I had to complete an internship program during my fourth year at Ryerson University. The only goal I set for myself, really, was to do an internship that would really put me out of my comfort zone. I figured that this was my last chance to try something different before going into the “real world.” Initially, I had planned to do reporting in the Philippines, where I thought I could test my resilience. But when that didn’t pan out, I thought of the second hardest type of journalism that I thought I could never do: business. So I emailed my internship coordinator and she gave me a contact at BNN. I emailed the network’s executive producer and got an interview in two weeks.

What attracted you to this company?

The fact that it’s the only TV channel in Canada that focuses only on business and finance news. It’s a great place to have an immersive learning experience because you don’t get pulled into different areas of news.

What skills did you learn during your internship?

I learned to actually read reports—cover to cover. Journalism school teaches students to listen for “juicy quotes” but a lot of reporting is simply poring over documents. Surprisingly, in most cases the more interesting points are only glossed over in page one. You’ve got to dig deep.

How long did you intern with BNN?

Six weeks.

What was the most valuable thing you took from your internship experience?

When you throw yourself into a situation knowing that everything about it will be new and unfamiliar, it sort of gives you a sense of self like never before. That’s probably the most valuable thing I took from this—a self-assurance that I can dip my toes into all sorts of new and unfamiliar endeavors and not be afraid of them.

How did you turn your internship into a job?

The truth of it is, I simply asked. I let my supervisor know that I would make myself available for them if they ever need any help. I asked if I could stay on as an intern, so I could get the hang of everything, in case they needed someone to fill in during the holidays.

What role do you have within the company now?

I’m part of BNN.ca‘s web team. I edit and post videos and wire stories to the website. I also write mini-articles that go along with interview segments. Basically, I help make sure that the television segments are translated into web content that’s hopefully valuable to both the core BNN viewers and the wider online audience as well.

What advice do you have for other interns?

Don’t pretend like you know it all. The veterans will see right through you. And besides, it’s easier for you to absorb your surroundings when you let yourself become a blank slate.

Apr24

Intern Spotlight: Kailey Sibley

pName: Kailey Sibley

Intern Position Title: Social Media for CBC Olympics and Hockey Night in Canada

Company: CBC Sports

Location: Toronto

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

I’m a tiny sports fanatic living in downtown Toronto. I’ve recently finished the Radio & Television Arts program at Ryerson University, and am working my way into the world of sports broadcasting. I can tell you anything you need to know about the Stanley Cup, loose-leaf tea, and Orca Whales. I’m a huge fan of a good goal celebration, 4th-liner jerseys, and a solid playoff beard.

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

I actually applied to do a shot-listing internship for Hockey Night in Canada. I had to send in my resume and cover letter around four times before I was contacted for an interview. The interview was terrible. I was told I would never get to actually watch any sports during the internship because I’d be too busy getting coffee for people and running up and down the stairs. I asked if they had any writing and social media internships available. I was told no. A month later they asked me if I would do a writing and social media internship for the Olympics. I said yes, obviously.

What attracted you to this company?

CBC Sports is the pinnacle of sports broadcasting in Canada. I grew up watching Don Cherry and Ron MacLean on Hockey Night in Canada every Saturday night. The opportunity to be a part of the CBC Sports team during the Winter Olympics was too good to pass up.

What skills did you learn at your internship?

I now speak in 140-character bursts.

Could you describe what a typical day was like for you as an intern?

The Olympics were a crazy time on the CBC Sports floor. We had an awesome social media team working 24 hours a day, every day from Day -1 of the Olympics, to Day 16. As soon as I arrived for my 8 a.m. start, I was updating Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, and YouTube constantly. Covering hockey was my main focus. I would sit and watch every single game, live-tweeting them from one account on my phone and another on my laptop. I feel like I didn’t look up from my screen until the night shift arrived to take over social media duties!

What was the most challenging part?

The first time I tweeted a mistake. Everyone always says, “It’s okay to make mistakes.” When you’re representing a major corporation on social media, it isn’t okay to make mistakes. Always quadruple-check your work!

Most memorable moment?

Live-tweeting the men’s gold medal hockey game on the CBC Olympics and Hockey Night in Canada accounts. I literally skipped into work at 5 a.m. that morning. It was like Christmas for me. This is closely followed by the time I got to have a slice of Don Cherry’s birthday cake.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Exciting–there’s always something happening there.

What advice do you have for someone who is just starting to look for an internship?

Be persistent. Know everyone, and make sure everyone knows you. Never be that person everyone sees around but no one actually knows who you are. Offer to work on your days off. Dress for the job you want, not the one you have. Even if everyone else is in jeans, if your boss dresses up, you should too. Try not to yawn in front of your employers. Be enthusiastic about everything. Never apologize for doing your job. Triple-check your work…then check it again.

Who do you look up to in the industry?

My boss, Monika Platek. She does everything from writing, to social media, to on-air work. I swear she never sleeps.

What is your dream job?

Anything that involves talking about sports into a microphone.

Feb06

Intern Spotlight: Jacky Le

1797057_10153791614345725_818946895_nName: Jacky Le

Intern Position Title: Digital Intern

Company: FASHION Magazine

Location: Toronto/Vancouver

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

I’m a West Coast boy at heart raised in the yuppie and yogi-filled city of Vancouver. I kind of fell into writing and journalism during high school and eventually I cultivated a love for the fashion publishing industry, which has led me to relocate here in Toronto. I have a huge affinity for Beyonce, London fashion and pop culture, and I never shy away from a dance floor.

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

For FASHION I was able to land the internship with a good word from an editor at FLARE Magazine where I had interned prior. Honestly it’s all about who you know and leaving a good impression from the get-go, that can really determine what your next job will be. Also, I landed the FLARE internship after spotting a tweet from one of the editors. It truly shows the power that social media has in our generation.

What attracted you to this company?

In my opinion FASHION & FLARE are at the highest echelon in the fashion industry within Canada. I always believe it’s important to learn from the best so that obviously influenced my decision on where I wanted to intern.

What skills are you learning at your internship?

Digital and interactive media plays a huge part in the fashion publishing industry now. People always say digital is where things are heading and I slightly agree. Unlike print, the turnover rate for content is super fast paced so you always have to be on the ball and ready to product content, as well as know what is current and in the news.

What has been a highlight so far?

Getting to be an integral part of the team. And I get a kick out of seeing my name in the magazine masthead as well.

Most challenging part?

Learning that it’s okay to make mistakes. As an intern this is the time in your career where you should be making mistakes. Simply learn from them and make sure you never make those mistakes again in the future when you enter the real work field.

Could you describe what a typical day is like for you as an intern?

If I’m not skimming the internet or looking for pitches and buzz-worthy articles, I’m most likely working on an assigned post. As well, I’m scheduling tweets and Facebook posts for the ongoing days.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Fast-paced. I think that’s two? Oh well…haha.

What advice do you have for someone who is just starting to look for an internship?

Pick a magazine that you would ideally want to work for. Once you land that internship, chuck your ego and pride at the door and soak up as much information as you can. Be polite and always look as if you’re having the time of your life even when you’re not.

Who do you look up to in the industry?

Katie Grand, Nicola Formichetti , Derek Blasberg. As well as my former teacher Tyler Udall.

What is your dream job?

Senior editor at Vogue UK or W Magazine.  A boy can dream…

 

Jan28

Intern Spotlight: Jonathan Jackson

 

Screen Shot 2014-01-26 at 9.56.02 PMName: Jonathan Jackson

Intern Position Title: Social Media Editor

Company: TOPMAN Canada and Hudson’s Bay

Location: Toronto

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

Toronto native. Worked in retail since 2006 for Hudson’s Bay and H&M. Attending Ryerson in the Business Management program majoring in Global Management and minoring in Finance. I knew about the brand before Hudson’s Bay launched it in Canada so I jumped at the opportunity to transfer to the new location on Queen and move downtown in 2012. I then worked for the brand for a year before I pursued an internship.

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

The position had been posted in the back of the Topshop stock room for a solid month. After the position had been filled, I worked up the courage to send a detailed cover letter and resume asking to provide any help to the Marketing and Events Manager for Topshop/TOPMAN. I was called for an interview the next day in the afternoon and went in for an interview early that evening. On my way to another job I received an email asking to begin as soon as I could.

What attracted you to this company?

Strong company profile and market presence. I have worked for Hudson’s Bay for nearly 5 years now. Over these years I’ve witnessed first hand the changes the new board of directors have implemented and they are phenomenal. No other company in Canada has the history, the customer loyalty, and has been able to reinvent themselves so well to meet the needs of the Canadian consumer. These are key in companies that stand out to me when I look at where I want to be employed with in the future… Not to mention they just acquired Lord & Taylor!

What skills are you learning at your internship?

My boss has truly been inspirational in helping me to understand what an individual can achieve for a brand with social media marketing. She has helped me to keep cool and stay authentic to the brand when creating. Another skill I am learning to master is the art of editing. Less is always more in marketing so it’s key to make sure that what is being presented is clean and concise—most importantly COOL.

What has been a highlight so far?Screen Shot 2014-01-26 at 9.58.01 PM

I had the opportunity to implement, monitor and report on a national marketing campaign for TOPMAN during the Christmas season called TOPMAN After Hours. It was exciting to be able to facilitate it with little help and receive the reaction that we did on our social platforms. Another highlight would be on Black Friday. As Black Friday is heavily dependent on social media, a lot of pressure was placed on the interns to deploy the content provided from those above us at the right times and drive sales.

Most challenging part?

Time management. I now go to school full-time, intern, and work in a restaurant so I am always short for time. The challenge doesn’t seem so challenging though when you enjoy working with your team as much as I do!

Could you describe what a typical day is like for you as an intern?

Walk five minutes on Queen St. to the Simpson Tower. Whip my Mac open and start scoping out TOPMAN Generation (TOPMAN’s online magazine/also an app), check their Twitter, Instagram and Facebook to see what the head guys are doing back home in the England and in the US. Next I head downstairs to the store floor to snap a few shots of items, mannequins, and outfits that would be perfect for TOPMAN Canada. I then curate a Content Calendar using photos that other personal shoppers in TOPMAN locations across Canada and I have taken and create texts to accompany the shot. After a lot of editing and prayers, I either email my boss or we sit and go over everything. That is when the real learning happens.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Dynamic. While it looks like your standard office with no windows, women everywhere dressed in business casual attire and heels of course, the individuals working there are all full of life and truly have the goals of Hudson’s Bay at front of mind.

What advice do you have for someone who is just starting to look for an internship?

Be confident. Know what field you want to get into but don’t feel that you need to know exactly what you want in the future to gain knowledge from the internship. I was not sure about getting in to marketing but now that I have experience with a major corporation, I can see why the jobs are so attractive to business students.

What is your dream job?

I don’t really have a dream job. I just want to be able to do something that makes me happy and allows me to be just as content outside of work. Right now that would be to continue to work in marketing for an amazing company. Somewhere warm year-round would be ideal though!

Dec22

What You Missed from the LinkedIn Challenge

linkedin

We kicked off the month of December with the LinkedIn Challenge. For 21 days, Sarah Santacroce sent us one tip for each day in order to share with our talent and employers on how to leverage many LinkedIn possibilities. Read our recap of the entire LinkedIn challenge…

Our favorite days

Day 6: Gaining more visibility by commenting on people’s updates.

Day 9: Send a personal thank you message, after accepting a LinkedIn connection. Lori Ruff said it best, “saying thank you when hardly anyone else does is a great way to standout in a crowded marketplace.”

What the experts had to say

Rick Itzkowich, the LinkedIn Guy, honed in on having a memorable headline.

Viveka von Rosen, the LinkedIn Expert, touched on the practice of “reverse engineering.” This is a way to communicate with individuals you share a group with by doing a simple people or advanced search. Through these searches, you can see if a person is a member of a shared group and send them a message to connect.

Jo Saunders of Wildfire Social Marketing expound on one of the most hated acts of social networking – being a spammer! Never treat LinkedIn as a mailing list. Like Saunders said, “being connected does not give you the okay to send me your bulk message via LinkedIn.”

Be sure to watch the Google+ video recap of the LinkedIn Challenge finale here!

For more tips on LinkedIn, join the #LinkedInchat on twitter every Tuesday at 8PM EST or follow @SarahSantacroce and @LinkedInExpert

Nov13

Interview with Rena Tom of Makeshift Society

renaportrait

Some people may know Rena Tom as a business strategist consulting with product designers, while many others know her as the Founder of Makeshift Society San Francisco… and now Makeshift Society Brooklyn.

Makeshift Society is a clubhouse for creative freelancers and a space to sustain low-growth businesses. With the “make, learn, teach and think” motto at the core of the space, Rena Tom talks with Creative Interns about how she’s bringing that motto to Brooklyn.

Creative Interns: What made you create Makeshift society in San Francisco?

Rena Tom: I was doing consulting work, some in-person and some over the phone. I was having trouble finding a place to work, so I started renting space at Workshop during the daytime hours when no one was there. While renting the space, I was sitting there basically by myself. Over time, I found myself at the coffee shop more and more just to be around people.

I started talking to my friends who were independent workers, bloggers and designers and I realized we were all in the same boat (wanting to engage with others while working). So I decided I would make a little office space for people and the more people I talked to, the more people wanted to be involved with the space. And so it evolved into a working space – Makeshift Society.

makeshift

CI: Why did you decide to expand to Brooklyn?

RT: As soon as we opened in San Francisco, we were getting a lot of requests all over the country saying this is a great idea and wishing we were in their city. My friend, Bryan Boyer, was moving to New York and was interested in developing another Makeshift location.

CI: Do you feel Makeshift Society Brooklyn will contribute to the growing creative digital space that is happening in Brooklyn?

RT: Definitely! That’s the reason why we thought it would be ideal to have our second space in Brooklyn – sort of a hub for the east coast. Brooklyn has an enormously large creative population, especially in the freelance side and it does have a good tie to San Francisco. We are there for the independent consultants and entrepreneurs in Brooklyn – designers who want to remain freelance; photographers who get hired to take product shots; or copywriters who are brought in to work on a collection.

CI: Will there be opportunities to work directly with Makeshift Society Brooklyn?

RT: There will be employees on site and we would like to take on interns in marketing, event planning and programming. Beyond that, we are leaving a lot of it up to the members and the companies we will be partnering with.

CI: When can emerging creatives expect to use the Brooklyn space?

RT: We are depending on the completed construction of the site, but first quarter of 2014 is our goal.

For more about Makeshift Society Brooklyn, connect with them on twitter: @MakeshiftSocBK

 

Nov07

Intern Spotlight: Callia Hargrove

1452481_10152046690226096_1370954903_n

Name: Callia Hargrove

Intern Position Title: Digital/Social Media Intern

Company Name: Ralph Lauren

Location: New York

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

I’m a twenty-year-old native New Yorker. I live in Manhattan and attend the Fashion Institute of Technology. I’m currently interning in the social media department at Ralph Lauren. This is my fourth internship and so far, it’s one of the most exciting/interesting/challenging!

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

I got this internship through sheer luck. One of my old bosses at Of a Kind knew someone in the social media department at Ralph Lauren who was looking for an intern, and she recommended me. From there I went through two interviews and I started in September.

What attracted you to this company?

I love how classic Ralph Lauren is. I grew up wearing Ralph Lauren and it’s so great to have the opportunity to intern at a place with so much history. It’s also great that Ralph Lauren is one of the first companies that I’ve interned at that my family recognizes. To them, it’s like a little symbol that I’m making it.

What skills are you learning at this internship?

So many skills. This is my first internship in social media so I sort of went in a little blind. I was pretty well-versed on all of the different social channels but I was missing the connection between ideas and executions. I’m learning a lot about how to translate one idea into something that can live on all of the different social media platforms.

What has been a highlight so far?

Definitely helping out with Ralph Lauren’s involvement in the 2014 Olympics. I got to really lend some of my ideas to what’s coming up in terms of social, and it was very exciting to be involved with something so iconic.

Most challenging part?

To me the most challenging thing in all of my internships has been balancing my schedule. Along with interning, I have a part-time job at a photography museum and I go to school full-time. I literally have one day off a week. Sometimes it can be hard to find time to breathe, but in order to get where I want to be, I know that I have to hustle.

Could you describe what a typical day is like for you as an intern?

Most days in the social media department start off with checking Ralph Lauren’s various social channels (Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, etc.). I’m mainly responsible for Pinterest so I check in with the team to see what we’re trying to achieve for the day and what needs to be pinned. Afterwards, we might have a brainstorm for a new initiative or continue working on a plan that’s almost in the execution stage. Social media is constantly changing, so each day brings something new.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Inspiring. Everyone on the social media team is great on their own, but seeing all of us come together and merge our ideas to create something that I can watch live on our social channels is so rewarding.

What advice would you give to someone just starting to look for an internship?

I would say don’t let a “no” stop you. I’ve probably applied to over 50 internships and gotten offered less than 10. Don’t be afraid of rejection. Yolo is my motto and I’m always putting myself out there for things. In the fashion industry, nothing worth having comes easy, so be ready to work hard and make connections. Once you get that internship, all of your hard work will be worth it.

What is your dream job?

This changes every week. I know that I want to work in fashion in an area that combines writing and marketing, but I’m just not sure what that job looks like exactly. Right now I’m thinking a Digital Market Editor, but tomorrow I’ll probably have a different answer.