Tag Archives: fashion

Feb06

Intern Spotlight: Jacky Le

1797057_10153791614345725_818946895_nName: Jacky Le

Intern Position Title: Digital Intern

Company: FASHION Magazine

Location: Toronto/Vancouver

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

I’m a West Coast boy at heart raised in the yuppie and yogi-filled city of Vancouver. I kind of fell into writing and journalism during high school and eventually I cultivated a love for the fashion publishing industry, which has led me to relocate here in Toronto. I have a huge affinity for Beyonce, London fashion and pop culture, and I never shy away from a dance floor.

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

For FASHION I was able to land the internship with a good word from an editor at FLARE Magazine where I had interned prior. Honestly it’s all about who you know and leaving a good impression from the get-go, that can really determine what your next job will be. Also, I landed the FLARE internship after spotting a tweet from one of the editors. It truly shows the power that social media has in our generation.

What attracted you to this company?

In my opinion FASHION & FLARE are at the highest echelon in the fashion industry within Canada. I always believe it’s important to learn from the best so that obviously influenced my decision on where I wanted to intern.

What skills are you learning at your internship?

Digital and interactive media plays a huge part in the fashion publishing industry now. People always say digital is where things are heading and I slightly agree. Unlike print, the turnover rate for content is super fast paced so you always have to be on the ball and ready to product content, as well as know what is current and in the news.

What has been a highlight so far?

Getting to be an integral part of the team. And I get a kick out of seeing my name in the magazine masthead as well.

Most challenging part?

Learning that it’s okay to make mistakes. As an intern this is the time in your career where you should be making mistakes. Simply learn from them and make sure you never make those mistakes again in the future when you enter the real work field.

Could you describe what a typical day is like for you as an intern?

If I’m not skimming the internet or looking for pitches and buzz-worthy articles, I’m most likely working on an assigned post. As well, I’m scheduling tweets and Facebook posts for the ongoing days.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Fast-paced. I think that’s two? Oh well…haha.

What advice do you have for someone who is just starting to look for an internship?

Pick a magazine that you would ideally want to work for. Once you land that internship, chuck your ego and pride at the door and soak up as much information as you can. Be polite and always look as if you’re having the time of your life even when you’re not.

Who do you look up to in the industry?

Katie Grand, Nicola Formichetti , Derek Blasberg. As well as my former teacher Tyler Udall.

What is your dream job?

Senior editor at Vogue UK or W Magazine.  A boy can dream…

 

Nov07

Intern Spotlight: Callia Hargrove

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Name: Callia Hargrove

Intern Position Title: Digital/Social Media Intern

Company Name: Ralph Lauren

Location: New York

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

I’m a twenty-year-old native New Yorker. I live in Manhattan and attend the Fashion Institute of Technology. I’m currently interning in the social media department at Ralph Lauren. This is my fourth internship and so far, it’s one of the most exciting/interesting/challenging!

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

I got this internship through sheer luck. One of my old bosses at Of a Kind knew someone in the social media department at Ralph Lauren who was looking for an intern, and she recommended me. From there I went through two interviews and I started in September.

What attracted you to this company?

I love how classic Ralph Lauren is. I grew up wearing Ralph Lauren and it’s so great to have the opportunity to intern at a place with so much history. It’s also great that Ralph Lauren is one of the first companies that I’ve interned at that my family recognizes. To them, it’s like a little symbol that I’m making it.

What skills are you learning at this internship?

So many skills. This is my first internship in social media so I sort of went in a little blind. I was pretty well-versed on all of the different social channels but I was missing the connection between ideas and executions. I’m learning a lot about how to translate one idea into something that can live on all of the different social media platforms.

What has been a highlight so far?

Definitely helping out with Ralph Lauren’s involvement in the 2014 Olympics. I got to really lend some of my ideas to what’s coming up in terms of social, and it was very exciting to be involved with something so iconic.

Most challenging part?

To me the most challenging thing in all of my internships has been balancing my schedule. Along with interning, I have a part-time job at a photography museum and I go to school full-time. I literally have one day off a week. Sometimes it can be hard to find time to breathe, but in order to get where I want to be, I know that I have to hustle.

Could you describe what a typical day is like for you as an intern?

Most days in the social media department start off with checking Ralph Lauren’s various social channels (Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, etc.). I’m mainly responsible for Pinterest so I check in with the team to see what we’re trying to achieve for the day and what needs to be pinned. Afterwards, we might have a brainstorm for a new initiative or continue working on a plan that’s almost in the execution stage. Social media is constantly changing, so each day brings something new.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Inspiring. Everyone on the social media team is great on their own, but seeing all of us come together and merge our ideas to create something that I can watch live on our social channels is so rewarding.

What advice would you give to someone just starting to look for an internship?

I would say don’t let a “no” stop you. I’ve probably applied to over 50 internships and gotten offered less than 10. Don’t be afraid of rejection. Yolo is my motto and I’m always putting myself out there for things. In the fashion industry, nothing worth having comes easy, so be ready to work hard and make connections. Once you get that internship, all of your hard work will be worth it.

What is your dream job?

This changes every week. I know that I want to work in fashion in an area that combines writing and marketing, but I’m just not sure what that job looks like exactly. Right now I’m thinking a Digital Market Editor, but tomorrow I’ll probably have a different answer.

Nov05

Career Path Interview: Online Fashion Features Editor Julia Rubin

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Julia Rubin is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and now works as the Associate Online Editor for Fashion Features at Teen Vogue. She gives insight into her internship experiences and shares some advice for students hoping to break into the ever-growing fashion industry.

During college, where did you gain internship experience?

I interned every summer in college. I interned at Yves Saint Laurent in New York for my first two summers and I was in the creative services/visual merchandising department. We were responsible for anything visual that was not designing the clothes, so that was the window displays, general store curation, what events looked like, and it was great. I loved it, but I knew I wanted to try something else. So that third summer, I spent half the week interning at Chanel in the communications department and the other half in sales and marketing at Phaidon, which is a publisher, and they have lots of really cool art and fashion and food books. I did those internships when I was in school and was always in New York, but knew that none of them were totally the right fit. During the school year, I worked for the arts and culture magazine at school, kind of like The Village Voice for Penn. So I worked there since the first day of school and rose through the ranks and eventually was the Editor-In-Chief. In my junior year I started up the campus blog. It was great. It was the point when I realized I loved writing, loved editing, and loved the Internet. Even though I interned in fashion, I was much more interested in media, and because of my background in fashion, it was easy to put the two together and start off as a fashion writer and editor.

What was the most important thing you learned from interning?

I just really loved that as an intern, you’re an observer. I’ve always been really interested in seeing how groups of people work, what structures are like, how everything works, and all the nitty gritty stuff. In terms of general skills, just seeing that the people who were the happiest were the people who were really really into what they did. That’s how my team was at YSL for example. They were all so obsessed with all the visual stuff; they lived it and breathed it. So I wanted to find something that I felt that way about because that’s why they were so good at their jobs. That’s ultimately what led me to realizing that my passion was writing and editing.

What was the most challenging part along the way during the job hunt when you were fresh out of school?

For me, the hardest thing was coming to terms with the fact that I wanted to be a writer and editor. This is a pretty difficult industry and it can be a trying thing on a personal level. So just deciding that I was going to do it and diving in head first, was definitely the scariest.

How did you land a job at Teen Vogue?

My first job out of school was with a fashion news site called Styleite. I was there for two years and I started out as an intern and was promoted a few different times. By the time I left, I was the managing editor of the site. In my first year at Styleite, I received an email from a web editor at Teen Vogue. It was really the coolest email I’ve ever gotten. She told me that she read my stuff on Styleite and she really liked my article on Karlie Kloss. We ended up keeping in touch, helping each other out and having a professional email relationship. A year later, I got an email from her saying that there was a position opening on the web team that she thought I’d be perfect for and her boss would be reaching out. And she did. The rest is history.

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

July was a very exciting month for me because a bunch of crazy things all happened at once. This was all within a matter of weeks, which was insane. I went to Berlin for a Selena Gomez event, which was really cool because I had never travelled anywhere, much less internationally, for work. That was super cool. Then I came back and found out that a feature story I had written for the magazine was green lit for an upcoming issue so I was hurrying to get that all together. It was super exciting because this was the first print story I had in the magazine and it was about teenage heroin use, which is a really crazy and important topic to cover right now. So I had to put the finishing touches on that. Also, Teen Vogue launched its video channel and I was able to be in one of the videos.  I don’t think I’m particularly good on camera but I was very flattered and really excited with how it all turned out. So it was cool to be able to do so many different things and it was very much a realization of how multi-faceted it is being at a magazine. Even though I’m on digital, I write lots of stories for the website but am still able to write for the magazine and work with video, so it was very cool to see all that come together and be a part of it.

What advice do you have for students hoping to get into this industry?

What I did was reach out to people I had some sort of connection to and really respected. The connection can be small. Reach out to people who are not total strangers and keep up with those people. Figuring out what you even like is also really important and just looking around. I found my first job from a tweet. A friend of the woman who became my boss told me to get in touch with her. It’s all just weird things like that. Always be open. Also don’t feel like you have to say yes. If you get a job opportunity that comes your way and you know that you’re not going to be happy there, don’t take it. If you genuinely think this is not something you want to do and you just want to say yes to end the job search, that’s not great. Wait until something comes along that could be an opportunity for you and a good launching point. Even if it ends up being something you don’t like, that’s okay too. Don’t be afraid to change direction. That’s okay. Get out as soon as you can. Life is too short.

Where do you see yourself in the next few years?

I think that what I’ll ultimately do, or continue to do, probably doesn’t exist right now. When I started college, the job that I had by the time I graduated did not exist. It just didn’t. When I graduated high school in 2006, the idea that you could be a paid writer and editor on the Internet, writing about fashion, going to all the same events that the print editors were going to, it was just unheard of. Those jobs just did not exist and if they did, they were very few and far between. My job at Teen Vogue didn’t exist until I started there. So I kind of have to imagine that what I do next doesn’t exist yet. The media industry is something that is just rapidly changing and the digital world really is expanding. I tell anyone who is looking to be a journalist now that there actually are more opportunities because magazine website staff keep growing and web-only places have fully fleshed-out mastheads now, which is great. I find it really encouraging.

Oct01

Intern Spotlight: Taylor Hicks

Taylor HicksName: Taylor Hicks

Intern Position Title: Styling Intern

Company Name: Emily Current and Meritt Elliott (MAUDE)

Location: Los Angeles, California

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

My name is Taylor Hicks. I am currently 18 years old and I live in Los Angeles, California. I attend the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising, where I major in Merchandise Marketing. I was also recently chosen to be the Fashion Director of FIDM’s student-run magazine FIDM MODE. Finally, I have had four amazing internships in the past year at companies such as Emily Current and Meritt Elliott, Jimmy Choo, WhoWhatWear, and Teen Vogue.

 

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

I am currently interning with celebrity stylists and designers Emily Current and Meritt Elliott. I landed this internship by essentially doing my research and frequently following up. I knew I had a deep interest in celebrity styling and therefore, wanted to gain valuable experience by interning for major stylists. I found Emily and Meritt’s official website and after doing a little digging, I came across a contact email for inquiries. I immediately sent an email to the contact, explaining my previous experiences and interest in styling. I had to follow up at least two times before I received a response. Once I heard back, I was given an interview a week later and got the internship on the spot! I have been interning for them ever since.

What attracted you to this company?

I have always had a passion for pop culture and styling for as long as I can remember. Also, I have been a massive fan and admirer of Emily and Meritt’s work with their denim line Current/Elliott and celebrity clients like Emma Roberts and Mandy Moore. That said, it was a no-brainer when it came time to decide which celebrity stylists I was most interested in interning for. Today, Emily and Meritt have a total of six celebrity clients, including Jessica Alba, Emma Roberts, Sophia Bush, Mandy Moore, Ashley Tisdale, and Nikki Reed. Their styling aesthetic greatly represents the young, experimental lady who is seen by many as a true trendsetter, which is exactly where my heart lies when it comes to celebrity styling.

What skills are you learning at this internship?

There are an abundance of skills that I have learned from interning for Emily Current and Meritt Elliott, which include time management, networking, project management, decision-making, etc. The skills that my internship has taught me are invaluable and have helped me grow in my professional career by allowing me to dive head first into the world of styling and maneuver my way through every situation.

What has been a highlight so far?

The highlight of my internship has been all of the individuals who I am fortunate enough to work with on a daily basis. From Emily and Meritt’s team and their celebrity clientele to the employees at the public relations companies; each of them have made my internship more incredible and educational. I pinch myself every single day because I have been given the opportunity to work with people who believe in me and trust me while allowing me to live out my dreams.

Most challenging part?

The most challenging part of my internship has to be accepting the fact that nothing is ever going to be perfect and that obstacles and set-backs are inevitable. I tend to be a perfectionist and I am a tad bit OCD when it comes to organization and execution so it has definitely been a challenge to accept that I will make mistakes and there are always problems. However, I have come to learn that being a stylist is so much more than just creating looks because a large aspect of the career is problem-solving, which is a challenge in its own right.

Could you describe what a typical day is like for you as an intern?

A typical day for me as an intern is insanely busy and unpredictable, which I love. I usually begin my day at the studio, organizing all of the racks of clothes to be set up for a fitting or returned to PR companies. After I have returned all of the clothes and accessories to PR companies, I head back to the studio to get prepared for pick-ups of new clothes and accessories for the next fitting. Then, there are some days when we have fittings or photo shoots and my day is completely spent preparing for those or working at them. The most exciting part of my internship are the fittings and photo shoots because everything is so hands-on and in the moment. These two events are when I am able to learn the most and see how my bosses work their magic.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Stimulating.

What advice would you give to someone just starting to look for an internship?

The best advice that I can give to someone that is just starting to look for an internship is to have a deep passion for what you’re doing and to never stop trying. You will always have to follow up with people because of their busy schedules and not everyone is going to tell you ‘yes.’ However, this should never stop you from chasing after your dreams because I know so many people who are living proof that ambition and hard work can take you wherever you want to go. Also, kindness is always in style and it will take you far in life because people who are nice are always remembered.

What is your dream job?

My dream job is to be in styling, whether it’s celebrity styling, editorial, or being a fashion director for a major department store. I love merchandise and that is exactly what I want my career to surround itself around. Ultimately, I want a career that allows me to indulge myself in every aspect of fashion and I think working at a magazine like Teen Vogue or a department store like Bloomingdale’s could allow for that.

Sep17

The NEW Purpose of Fashion

Verneda White HUMAN INTONATIONVerneda Adele White is the Founder and Creative Director of HUMAN INTONATION, a charity-driven, premium apparel brand that uses fashion as a platform to raise awareness for social and human rights issues like HIV/AIDS prevention, rebuilding New Orleans and educating children in Darfur. Creative Interns has the story of how an emerging creative talent became a dedicated entrepreneur by turning her single vision into “The NEW Purpose of Fashion”.

Creative Interns: What inspired Human Intonation?

Verneda White: Two separate events that happened close together drove the development of Human Intonation – my family’s experience with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in August 2005 and the death of my close first cousin to AIDS in February 2006. I first started designing T-shirts for Hands on New Orleans, our longest existing non-profit partnership, to promote volunteerism in the Gulf Coast following the hurricane. I wanted to do something constructive with my energy and create a positive project out of my experiences that would be beneficial to others. Today we support four causes in total.

CI: As the founder and creative director of Human Intonation, where do your creative ideas flow from?

VW: Inspiration comes from a combination of things from the missions of our non-profit partners to researching new colors and textures. My first objective is to create quality garments with a creative design that carries the message of the causes we support into everyday life: how can we create a call to action or start a conversation about these issues? I also graduated from Cornell University with a Bachelor of Science in Textile and Apparel Management, and some of my creative ideas stemmed from there in terms of garment construction and sourcing organic and environmentally sustainable fabrics.

CI: After just recently celebrating your five-year anniversary, what would you attribute the success of your business to?

VW: 99 percent is having the sheer determination to make it happen. As a small business owner and social entrepreneur, you have to be determined to do things most people aren’t willing to do. The other 1 percent I would have to say is really knowing your business – trial and error and taking those lessons learned in order to do things differently next time. Some of the things I am doing now were not on my radar five years ago. For example, if you asked me five years ago if I envisioned writing my own blog for the Huffington Post or speaking to high school students across Brooklyn I would have told you no.

CI: What was your most recent event/endeavor? What do you hope to do next?

VW: On August 19, 2013 we hosted our five year anniversary celebration, “For the Love of Life: Human Intonation”, where we presented our new collection of women and men t-shirts, tank tops, and dresses from which we donate 20 percent of the proceeds from each sale to our non-profit partners. After the event we were able to highlight the evolution of Human Intonation over five years and what is next for the brand.

I want to focus more on our community programs and expand on our workshops for teens and adults. On our business side, I want to continue to grow our wholesale partnerships. What is unique about our brand is that we have created our own T-shirts/wholesale line where we can produce the t-shirts for any occasion (we’ve created special edition shirts for the National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS and others). This piece of our business really helps us to move forward and expand.

CI: What advice would you give to emerging creative talent?

VW: First and foremost, learning your craft is key and it will help you to successfully execute. You need to be able to provide value to your customers and create something that is memorable.

Secondly, take your time. Sometimes I get so passionate about what I’m doing that I get ahead of myself and it has not been beneficial for me or our team. The opportunity for greatness will always be there, so take your time.

 

To support Human Intonation, shop www.humanintonation.com. You also have the option of donating directly to the organization’s non-profit partners

Jul30

Intern Spotlight: Hilary Taylor

DSC_0049Interviewee Name: Hilary Taylor

Intern Position Title: Planning Intern for AnnTaylor.com

Company Name: ANN Inc.

Location: New York City, NY

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

As a fourth year Retail Management student at Ryerson University, I have worked from the retail floor to the head office, soaking up every learning opportunity along the way. I am a passionate and driven student who is inspired by being told that something isn’t possible, or that I can’t do it. Hearing those words heightens my motivation and pushes me to my limits. Retail is what excites me, but I’m someone who finds happiness in accomplishments. I love finding a great deal while I’m shopping, running for an extra minute or mile, working that much harder. My passion for retail expands past the classroom, as I am the president of the Retail Students Association next year, and returning back to work at LOFT in the Eaton Center when I get back to Toronto. My eagerness to learn sets me apart from my peers, and I am continuously searching for new books to read, articles to share, advice to take and experiences to embrace that will further me in my career and my character.

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

ANN Inc. actually came to Ryerson and did a presentation about the internship for fashion and retail students. After the presentation I approached one of the presenters and told her how amazing the opportunity seemed, that she’d be hearing from me and gave her my business card (and now that I know her well she said I made a good impression by doing that and she remembered me). The application was pretty extensive (it was offered on the ANNLOFT careers page) and I worked with our career counselor to perfect my resume. A recruiter from ANN actually called me to set up an interview before I submitted my application and to this day I’m not sure how they got my phone number without my application (it’s not on my business card!) — but we set up an interview, I submitted my application and completed my interview via Skype. A few days later, they called me and said I got the job! I then had to complete a bunch of visa paperwork and try to find an affordable apartment in NYC, which turned out to be a more difficult task than the actual application. For the month of May I offered to work at LOFT in Yorkdale (this was something I offered during the interview process to set myself apart from other applicants) in order to get a taste of the company culture, and a better taste of the Canadian market: a job to which I will be returning in September.

What attracted you to this company?Screen Shot 2013-07-30 at 11.08.14 AM

ANN Inc. has a great company culture. It’s all about women understanding women, and creating product for women. I really liked that and it is definitely something that I can relate to. Internships in retail planning are also very hard to come by in Canada so I jumped at the opportunity—and obviously the location played a big part in the decision!

What skills are you learning while at your internship?

I have learned so many things during my time in NYC and at ANN Inc, both personal and professional. I’ve learned a lot about working with people, and when to keep my mouth shut! I have learned so much about the retail business and how customers can tell you so much about the positives and negatives of your business. My excel and math skills have definitely improved as well.

Can you describe what a normal day is for an intern at your company?

I work a LOT on excel! A LOT! I consistently work on mini projects, analyzing metrics to make business decisions. For example, I will look at current under-performing products (based on retail metrics like stock to sales, inventory count and gross margin) and decide on appropriate markdowns. I am in charge of keeping the team up to date on certain metrics that change every day and updating certain methods of communication. I also update several spreadsheets where we are testing different things and how the customers react. For example, we test different “free shipping” amounts to see which amount the customer resonates with best. I sit in on really interesting meetings with company executives, which is a really great experience to be able to watch them in action. The internship program hosts lunch and learns, where we hear from one company executive at a time about their experiences and advice for us entering the workforce. We are also working on a project with other interns so I am in charge of creating short term and long term plans for our new business and forecasting dollar and unit sales. All of these things make up a typical day!

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Feminine.

What advice would you give to someone just starting to look for an internship?

Show your eagerness to learn and your passion will also shine. One common piece of advice I’ve heard is that your passion shines through when you’re not trying to show it (or else it comes off fake). Also, don’t be afraid to set yourself apart. Yes, it may be awkward going up after a presentation to hand over your business card, or to speak up about something that is unique about you, but that’s what makes you memorable and brings you to the top of the list for possible hires.

What do you do to fill the inspiration gas tank?

I have a blog full of pictures that I find all over the Internet. If I had the time I’d love to have a blog with pictures that I’ve taken…but maybe when school is done. The pictures are of outfits that I love, and that I think encompass my style. I love seeing new ideas of ways to wear the clothes I already have! I also love quotes and song lyrics. I’m one of those girls that writes every single quote and lyric down that connects with me and any time I’m having a bad day or just looking for a little pick-me-up, I go back to that list.

What’s next for you?

I return to Toronto in three weeks and start getting ready for school! I am the president of the Retail Students association at my school this year, so I am already starting to get ready for a crazy year. I’m hoping to move into a job in retail planning or allocation when I graduate. My ideal places to work would be Winners or HBC, but who knows! I may end up back in NYC.

What’s your dream job?

My dream is to become the CEO of a large retail company (like Bonnie Brooks!) but to move up at a company through the buying/merchandising path. I’d love to be a DMM (divisional merchandise manager) and oversee the bigger picture of buying for shoes, accessories or handbags. (I’m an accessories girl all the way!)

Jul11

Sharing Wisdom: Tips From 8 Interns

With any internship experience, whether you’re just doing it for college credit or want to network your way into your dream job, you’re going to want to make the most out of it. How you might ask? If you’re new to the world of interning and need a bit of guidance, here are eight hardworking interns who were kind enough to share their wisdom.

We asked: What is the most important thing you’ve learned from an internship?

Christian Allaire, Ryerson University486572_4190918585353_1641567635_n

“Go after what you want. In a time when companies are increasingly relying on the help of interns, it’s not always easy getting to do everything you had hoped to do during your internship. So on top of being an asset to your workplace, you should also make personal objectives for yourself as well – whether that’s exploring the different departments or building relationships with editors.”

1059402_10151705432759875_1799658392_nNaomi Leanage, University of Guelph-Humber

The most important thing I’ve learned from an internship is that going above and beyond of what’s expected of you is what’s going to make you get noticed. There are dozens of other interns with the same skills and knowledge that you have, and the one thing that will make you stand out is your passion! At my internship at Tribute, I made an effort to check in with my editor everyday to chat, even about things that didn’t relate to tasks that I was working on. It helped build a relationship with her, and I’m for sure someone she’ll remember in a line of ever-changing interns. I also made sure to express my interests (doing interviews, writing movie reviews) and because of that, I’ve gotten opportunities in two weeks that other interns had to wait months to receive. It’s important not to be intimidated, and if you have a great idea, to go ahead and pitch it!

Erin McHenry, Drake Universityerin

“After interning as a communications intern for a government agency, I learned that I’m NOT interested in corporate communication the government . I learned a lot and greatly improved my writing skills, which will be helpful for any job I take. Even if you don’t enjoy an internship you still learn something: It’s not the right place for you, and you’re one step closer to finding your perfect job.”

DSC_0298Kaela Popoff, Kwantlen University

“The key thing I learned from my internship was the importance of communication. Checking in with your supervisors or boss about where you are at with your work and what you’ve completed helps them know how much work to give you. This way you’re never swamped nor bored, and you can meet your deadlines!”

 

Catherine Dugas, Fashion Institute of Technology1060927_10151707634803874_1698531869_n

“The most valuable thing I’ve learned from interning has to be that organization and attention to detail are key. There are so many small details that go into running a big company and they truly make all the difference. If you aren’t naturally organized, make sure to use an agenda and download organization apps on your phone keep you on point!”

Dun011112 - Version 2Hillary MacDonald, Ryerson University

“Listen, observe and pick the brains of those who work in positions that you would like to one day have.”

 

 

Kristin Doherty, Drake UniversityDoherty1

“What I’ve learned most is how important it is to work as a team with your coworkers and fellow interns. At the beginning of my internship, I felt a little competitive about who was getting the best assignments or doing the best job. But now I realize that we’re all working toward the same team goals. It’s more important for each of us to play to our strengths for the benefit of the team than to compete with each other for recognition or attention.”

DSC_0151 - Version 2Terrence Freeman, Humber College

“The most important thing I have learned from my internship so far is that things are rarely black and white, and you have to expect the unexpected. You have to figure a lot of things out on your own as you go, and you will likely run into dilemmas and have to figure out a lot on the spot without the help of your bosses who are often busy, or may not be there to help such as in a case where you are out of the office running an errand. I’ve now learned to expect to run into slight dilemmas here and there, so I try to ask my bosses an many questions as possible when I can before a task, and I also try to understand and remember what my bosses would want or do in the situation.”

Jul09

Career Path Interview: Founder/Creative Director Amy Levin

Interested in fashion? Want to start your own company? Get inspired by this young entrepreneur who took her career in her own hands and has worked hard to get to where she is today.

AmyLevin7Amy Levin is the Founder and Creative Director of CollegeFashionista.com. A Chicago native, she launched the website in 2009 after a semester abroad in London, where the growing importance of street style inspired her to create a community for fashion, photography and self expression amongst the college demographic. Originally serving only Indiana University’s campus, the site quickly spread to other colleges across the globe. Under Amy’s leadership, CollegeFashionista maintains an international presence with 500+ new articles posted a week and regular partners including Rebecca Minkoff, Shopbop and American Eagle Outfitters, to name a few.

A 2013 NYC Fashion Fellow, Levin has served as a seminar leader at Teen Vogue’s Fashion University and a guest lecturer at college campuses across the United States. Amy attended Indiana University and received a Bachelor of Arts in merchandising and business marketing. She is 26 years old and currently resides in New York City.

What specifically motivated you to go this direction in your career?

During my senior year of college, I felt completely disconnected from the fashion industry and wanted a way to feel connected, work on my writing skills and showcase inspirational fashion I was seeing around my campus. I realized there wasn’t a platform that focused specifically on college students and CollegeFashionista was born.

What type of activities, appointments and meetings do you have during a typical week?

My workdays are definitely a little hectic — throughout a typical day, I am in and out of the office going to meetings all over Manhattan. If I’m not on the go, I am usually on phone calls with brand partners, checking in with my employees to ensure the business is flowing properly.

Tell us about an unpleasant work experience that resulted in an invaluable career lesson.

When I first launched CollegeFashionista, it would inevitably crash and have hiccups. I remember thinking the entire company is lost. All our editorial features are gone. Clearly this wasn’t the case and I learned how to troubleshoot tech issues and to surround myself with programmers who were savvy and able to get any issues resolved as quickly as possible.Screen Shot 2012-09-08 at 4.30.37 PM

What piece of advice do you wish you followed earlier in your career?

I wish I knew how to manage my time effectively, prioritize, and not to take anything too seriously. I take my job very seriously but I also know that it is important to have fun while doing it and that at the end of the day everything will get done.

What tips can you offer a recent graduate that is preparing to interview for an entry-level position? 

It is very important to do your research of the company before going in for the interview. Know what the company is currently working on and know what you can do to make them stronger. Don’t let the interviewer tell you what you can do for them, you need to take initiative and let the company know that you have something to offer.

Who has inspired you as a mentor during your career and what was the most valuable lesson you learned from them?

I have had a series of incredible mentors who had allowed me to bounce ideas around and have really helped shaped my business. I think it’s important to find people who believe in you and have experience in an aspect of your business in which you may feel weak. I found five different mentors who all have various expertise and have been soundboards to me over the past three years.

If you had an opportunity to broadcast a special “thank you” to anyone via this interview, who would it be and what would you like us to say?

My family. I could not have started CollegeFashionista without them. Being an entrepreneur, there have been so many highs and lows and they have been the unconditional support group through every single aspect. They are truly amazing and I feel lucky for them everyday.

What books would you recommend for talent in your industry?

  • Delivering Happiness by Tony Hsieh
  • By Invitation Only by Alexis Maybank and Alexandra Wilkis Wilson
  • Pour Your Heart Into It by Howard Schultz and Dori jones
  • Rework by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson
  • Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg
Jul02

Intern Spotlight: Nicole Diane Girten

DSC_0375Interviewee Name: Nicole Diane Girten

Intern Position Title: Editing/Social Media Intern

Company Name: TrendSeeder

Company URL: http://www.trendseeder.com

Location (City/State): New York City, New York

Tell us a bit about yourself:

I’m a rising sophomore at the Florida State University pursuing an English major with concentrations in Creative Writing as well as Editing, Writing and Media. I’m currently the Campus CEO for the TrendSeeder Campus Leadership Program at FSU, leading a team of six in TrendSeeder objectives on campus and within the Tallahassee area. I also blog and act as a photo-shoot set assistant for an on-campus fashion magazine called Diverse World Fashion, which publishes an issue every semester. I previously worked as an assistant and sales associate for Miami-based jewelry designer, and Project Accessory runner-up, Nina Cortes. It was under Nina’s apprenticeship that I became inspired to pursue a career in the industry. This summer, I’m working as an Editing and Social Media Intern for TrendSeeder at their headquarters in New York City. I write weekly articles and contribute to TrendSeeder’s social media presence. While in the city I also took the opportunity to work as a set assistant for a Harper’s Bazaar Latin America shoot for three days.  I plan to continue building my portfolio and working towards my goal of writing freelance in fashion.

What steps did you take to land this internship?

I started my internship hunt last December, just looking through the careers tabs of websites I really enjoyed and started sending applications out. I was talking with a friend about my search and she told me about TrendSeeder’s Campus Leadership Program and told me to apply and see what happens. I originally intended to just be a fashion editor for the program, but decided to take the jump and go for the CEO position, which included a summer internship at the TrendSeeder headquarters in New York City. A few weeks after filling out the application and taking a phone interview, I got the call saying I would be summering in the city and writing for the TrendSeeder Editorial. To say the least, I was ecstatic!

What attracted you to this company?

TrendSeeder promotes and creates a platform for emerging designers, and having worked with emerging jewelry designer Nina Cortes, I was familiar with the perspective TrendSeeder was reflecting. I felt I would be able to use my previous work experience to my advantage and could better express the company’s point of view in my writing. I also wanted to work in fashion, and I saw TrendSeeder as an amazing opportunity to do so.

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What skills are you learning while at your internship?

I am learning the ins and outs of the fashion industry, as well as the world of editing. I am getting to experience hands-on the work that goes into every aspect of fashion—from marketing and strategic partnerships to creative content and social media, I’m learning what goes into running a fashion company.

Can you describe what a normal day is for an intern at your company?

On a normal day I come in around 10, get settled with my laptop and a cup of coffee and start working on the article assigned to me that week. I will also start posting on a variety of different social media sites, and I normally like to flip back and forth between the two. I’ll do one Polyvore post a day on average and post products to sites like Wanelo as well. I also keep up with the TrendSeederFSU social media, so I’ll intermittently do posts on that Facebook page and Twitter as well. In the afternoon we’ll normally either have a marketing meeting or a collaborative discussion about whatever project needs attention. Sometimes the team will even make mini field trips to sample sales on 5th Ave or take meetings with editorial writers. Every day holds a new possibility!

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Wonderful! Avani, TrendSeeder’s CEO, is really dedicated to making the work environment friendly and cooperative. All the executives are very approachable and want to collaborate with, or get input from, the interns in many different aspects of the company. It really makes for a positive place to work.

What advice would you give to someone just starting to look for an internship?

Find what you love and attack it full force. This sounds incredibly cliché, but with determination and a pinch of luck, you really can make anything happen. Do not waste your time and energy trying to excel at something you hate. That takes twice the effort with an emotional toll to boot. Push yourself, but realize that you are not going to necessarily succeed at everything at first. You are going to stumble and fall eventually, and accepting this off the bat is important; try to land as gracefully as possible, dust yourself off and keep on your way. Be opportunistic. When you see a door, do not hesitate to throw yourself through it. Every time a potential something crosses your path, even if you feel it might be out of reach, jump at it. New experiences are chances to grow and this reflects well on a resume. Work hard, keep your chin up and magic will happen.

What do you do to fill the inspiration gas tank?

Being in New York City has been an inspiration overload. From street style, to the architecture, to park performers, the endless possibilities and the variety of people here are what currently drive my creative efforts. I also find a lot of inspiration online with sites like Tumblr and Wanelo by just scrolling through and seeing what my eye is drawn to. Seeing the eclectic array of posts varying from typography and quotes, to graphic design and fashion campaigns is always a good way to get the creative juices flowing. I also love to practice yoga to help keep both mind and body in check. A clear head and a healthy body are personal needs to keep myself in tune creatively.

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What’s next for you?

I am going to continue working on my English major, keep up with TrendSeederFSU and Diverse World Fashion on campus and keep my eye out for new opportunities! I definitely want to come back to the city next summer, so I will either intern again with TrendSeeder or explore other options, but that decision is still a few months out. I’m also starting to look into grad schools, though this is a decision I have even longer to make. I’m just mostly trying to focus on the present, whether it is school or work, and push myself to do the best I can.

What’s your dream job?

I really would love to write freelance in fashion. Whether it’s for blogs or the major magazines, I really want to have my work in a multitude of publications. I think I would like the flexibility in the hours and the freedom to work where I please, though I do realize how insecure a career it is in comparison to a 9 to 5. Of course, I am young and my career path will probably shift here and there, but above all I really just want to be constantly surrounded with artistically-minded people. I think if I find an environment where I feel creatively motivated, I will be set.

Jun03

International Internship Experience: Climb Every Mountain-Sail Every Sea

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Ten years ago, who would have thought that one company could have employees working together from different countries, from all parts of the world, miles and miles away? The world is becoming more interconnected every day. Companies want to hire people from all around the world, exchange experiences and make their workforce more diverse and powerful.

As an international student, I can tell you from first-hand experience that companies like when you have overseas or international experience. I’m originally from Serbia. I found my way to Russia to study Russian in The Pushkin State Russian Institute over one summer and later in New York City to study Business and English at  New York Institute of Technology.

Every student that cares about their career and is hungry for experience should do at least one internship during their undergraduate studies. You can learn a lot from internship experiences. Even if the internship is unpaid, a quality company with knowledgeable workers and a structured internship program can boost your learning and help you develop new skills. Some unpaid internship programs are actually better than paid programs. It all depends on the type of experience and connections you are interested in obtaining.

You can earn industry experience, learn problem-solving skills, achieve accomplishments and all of that you can put on your resume to make it easier for you to get the job you are dreaming about. An international internship experience can benefit your career even more. Employers will recognize you as courageous for getting on the plane and flying into the unknown, working with other cultures and being able to use your knowledge and skills in any environment.

“Completing an internship overseas not only provides international work experience for your resume but also serves as a valuable cultural experience and network building opportunity. Also, if you want to practice improving a foreign language skill such as Spanish or Mandarin, consider interning in a country that requires you to speak these languages.”  says, Marc Scoleri, CEO of CreativeInterns.com and Co-Founder of Creative Village. There is no better way to master a foreign language than to immerse yourself in that country, so you can speak the language every day and hear it all around.

Some may think you need rich parents to get international internship experience, not true, you can first intern over the summer somewhere local and work a part-time job to save money to complete an international internship the following summer. There are many travel guides  explaining how to save money for traveling, and also revealing facts on how to travel for cheap. You might be surprised how many different opportunities there are and how many companies are seeking fresh talent coming from other countries to make their business better and  exchange knowledge, experience and ideas with them.

Housing and transportation can be costly so make sure you do your research and create savings goals and a budget before you hop on the plane, train or boat to your new destination. If you do good research you will be able to find great deals. Most of the companies will be happy to help you out, give you tips and tell you about local deals. Once you get there you will see that everything is not that complicated. You might go through a little cultural shock, but definitely by the end of the experience it will all be worth it. You will have expanded your horizons and gained more knowledge about different cultures and the world.

Long story short, an internship abroad offers you many benefits. It promises a memorable and enjoyable experience, but more than that it offers you the chance to impress potential employers.