Tag Archives: career advice

Apr29

5 Tricks that will make your LinkedIn profile stand out

LinkedIn_Profile

Why do you need to know some LinkedIn tricks?

LinkedIn is by far the biggest business and recruitment networking site that is available on the internet. There are many recruiters, headhunters and HR managers actively searching the listings for new employees as well as many businesses that are looking for business opportunities and partners. But if your profile does not make you stand out and let people know who you are and what you are capable of then you are likely to be overlooked. This is why it is vital to look at all of the professional LinkedIn tricks that are out there to help you to ensure that your LinkedIn profile gets noticed.

Make a detailed profile

Ensure that your profile is complete, use the tool that LinkedIn itself provides you to show your profile completeness and ensure that your profile is complete. Like your resume it needs to not show any major holes nor should you exaggerate anything that you include within your profile. If you are going to be making several updates and adding historical information to your profile it is often best to turn off your activity broadcasts so as not to bombard your connections with multiple updates. This can be done through “settings” and then “privacy controls” where you will find the option to turn them off.

Have a good heading and summary

Ensure that your summary and heading clearly reflect who you are and what your strengths and passions are. Most recruiters and others searchers will look at your headline and summary before they proceed any further with reading your profile so these must be spot on.

Use Keywords

Like any other search engine when you search for someone with a specific set of skills or a specific job title on LinkedIn the site will look for matches that contain the words that are being searched for. So if you are “Quality manager” and are looking for work in this area then you must ensure that you have the keywords used frequently within your profile, headline, and summary to ensure that you show up in the searches. So even if your last job title was “Organizational excellence manager” but the role was that of quality manager ensure that you say so or you will not get shown when people search for “quality manager”. The same goes for your skills and abilities, make sure that you clearly mention them and use the keywords that the recruiters and others will use when searching for them. This is one of the most important LinkedIn tricks from LinkedIn profile development experts if you want to be found by searchers.

Use a professional picture

While it may be OK to use that picture of you and the kids on holiday as your profile picture on Facebook or even a picture of your pet cat in a funny pose you will want to put forward a more professional image on LinkedIn. Always use a recent, clear professional quality picture of yourself for your profile picture on LinkedIn so that the searcher sees clearly who you are. Ensure that you are dressed and posed appropriately for your career in your picture.

Proofread carefully

Just like your resume, just a few simple avoidable mistakes can give completely the wrong impression to the reader of your profile. You must ensure that you carefully review and proofread your profile to eliminate all mistakes so that there is nothing to distract the reader or give the impression that you do not care about your profile.

Use a LinkedIn profile development service

A LinkedIn resume writing service or profile development service can help you to ensure that your profile is going to work for you. Having a professional with many years of experience using LinkedIn review and improve your profile can make a huge impact on how your profile is perceived and how often you will be found in searches. So if you really want to get the most from your profile use our LinkedIn tricks or contact resume writing service for professional help.

Apr24

Intern Spotlight: Kailey Sibley

pName: Kailey Sibley

Intern Position Title: Social Media for CBC Olympics and Hockey Night in Canada

Company: CBC Sports

Location: Toronto

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

I’m a tiny sports fanatic living in downtown Toronto. I’ve recently finished the Radio & Television Arts program at Ryerson University, and am working my way into the world of sports broadcasting. I can tell you anything you need to know about the Stanley Cup, loose-leaf tea, and Orca Whales. I’m a huge fan of a good goal celebration, 4th-liner jerseys, and a solid playoff beard.

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

I actually applied to do a shot-listing internship for Hockey Night in Canada. I had to send in my resume and cover letter around four times before I was contacted for an interview. The interview was terrible. I was told I would never get to actually watch any sports during the internship because I’d be too busy getting coffee for people and running up and down the stairs. I asked if they had any writing and social media internships available. I was told no. A month later they asked me if I would do a writing and social media internship for the Olympics. I said yes, obviously.

What attracted you to this company?

CBC Sports is the pinnacle of sports broadcasting in Canada. I grew up watching Don Cherry and Ron MacLean on Hockey Night in Canada every Saturday night. The opportunity to be a part of the CBC Sports team during the Winter Olympics was too good to pass up.

What skills did you learn at your internship?

I now speak in 140-character bursts.

Could you describe what a typical day was like for you as an intern?

The Olympics were a crazy time on the CBC Sports floor. We had an awesome social media team working 24 hours a day, every day from Day -1 of the Olympics, to Day 16. As soon as I arrived for my 8 a.m. start, I was updating Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, and YouTube constantly. Covering hockey was my main focus. I would sit and watch every single game, live-tweeting them from one account on my phone and another on my laptop. I feel like I didn’t look up from my screen until the night shift arrived to take over social media duties!

What was the most challenging part?

The first time I tweeted a mistake. Everyone always says, “It’s okay to make mistakes.” When you’re representing a major corporation on social media, it isn’t okay to make mistakes. Always quadruple-check your work!

Most memorable moment?

Live-tweeting the men’s gold medal hockey game on the CBC Olympics and Hockey Night in Canada accounts. I literally skipped into work at 5 a.m. that morning. It was like Christmas for me. This is closely followed by the time I got to have a slice of Don Cherry’s birthday cake.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Exciting–there’s always something happening there.

What advice do you have for someone who is just starting to look for an internship?

Be persistent. Know everyone, and make sure everyone knows you. Never be that person everyone sees around but no one actually knows who you are. Offer to work on your days off. Dress for the job you want, not the one you have. Even if everyone else is in jeans, if your boss dresses up, you should too. Try not to yawn in front of your employers. Be enthusiastic about everything. Never apologize for doing your job. Triple-check your work…then check it again.

Who do you look up to in the industry?

My boss, Monika Platek. She does everything from writing, to social media, to on-air work. I swear she never sleeps.

What is your dream job?

Anything that involves talking about sports into a microphone.

Apr23

Career Spotlight: Darnisha Bishop

Darnisha Bishop Darnisha is a seasoned professional with over 4 years of public relations and social media experience. Starting her career in Public Relations for an entertainment company, Darnisha gradually transitioned into the digital realm, focusing more on social media strategies. As an Assistant Social Advertising Planner at Neo@Ogilvy in New York City, she creates and executes paid social media strategies to help clients generate leads, increase brand awareness and consumer engagement. We had the chance to ask Darnisha a few questions about her role at Neo@Ogilvy and her life as a PR and social media professional. Creative Interns: What is it like being a paid social advertising planner at a global agency? Darnisha Bishop: My day-to-day is very unpredictable and heavily depends on the different campaigns that are running. Some days, I am planning how to execute paid strategies on multiple social media platforms, and other days I am spending time contributing to thought leadership pieces that help to educate my client about the benefits of incorporating paid social media strategies into their overall social strategies. CI: What made you chose a career path in social media and digital communications? DB: Social media is something I naturally gravitated toward over the years, so I guess you could say social media chose me! Having started my career in PR, I understood the benefits of incorporating social media strategies into the overall brand strategy. As time went on, I became more and more knowledgeable of social media and stayed current on evolving trends. It’s such a fun industry to be a part of, and it is constantly surprising me! CI: For news and updates in social media, what are your go-to resources and websites? DB: My list is long (very long). My top three are:

CI: What advice would you give students looking to enter your field? DB:

  • Stay on top of what is happening in the industry. Social media is big, and constantly evolving. New trends, apps, strategies pop up almost every day and it’s important to fully understand what is going on.
  • Internships are a great way to get hands on experience. I recommend starting out as an intern at an agency that specializes in social media strategies (whether it’s paid or organic). You’ll have a great understanding of how everything works, and will have access to amazing resources that will help you to continue to learn and grow.
  • Don’t be afraid to get out there and introduce yourself to different industry professionals. Networking is key! It is a great way to learn more about opportunities in social media.

CI: How do you see the social and digital media landscape evolving over the next five years? DB: We’re already seeing a drastic shift from desktop to mobile usage. Users are taking to their smartphones and tablets to access and share information on social networks. The next step will be social networks paying more attention to the needs of their users, and making their experience a more personalized one. Facebook has already begun this with their updated algorithm, organically generating content that they know their users will find valuable based on previous behaviors. Other platforms, like Twitter, for example, are following their lead. It will be interesting to see how each of the platforms begins to evolve in this direction. To learn more about Darnisha’s career path, connect with her on Twitter or LinkedIn.

Nov07

Intern Spotlight: Callia Hargrove

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Name: Callia Hargrove

Intern Position Title: Digital/Social Media Intern

Company Name: Ralph Lauren

Location: New York

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

I’m a twenty-year-old native New Yorker. I live in Manhattan and attend the Fashion Institute of Technology. I’m currently interning in the social media department at Ralph Lauren. This is my fourth internship and so far, it’s one of the most exciting/interesting/challenging!

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

I got this internship through sheer luck. One of my old bosses at Of a Kind knew someone in the social media department at Ralph Lauren who was looking for an intern, and she recommended me. From there I went through two interviews and I started in September.

What attracted you to this company?

I love how classic Ralph Lauren is. I grew up wearing Ralph Lauren and it’s so great to have the opportunity to intern at a place with so much history. It’s also great that Ralph Lauren is one of the first companies that I’ve interned at that my family recognizes. To them, it’s like a little symbol that I’m making it.

What skills are you learning at this internship?

So many skills. This is my first internship in social media so I sort of went in a little blind. I was pretty well-versed on all of the different social channels but I was missing the connection between ideas and executions. I’m learning a lot about how to translate one idea into something that can live on all of the different social media platforms.

What has been a highlight so far?

Definitely helping out with Ralph Lauren’s involvement in the 2014 Olympics. I got to really lend some of my ideas to what’s coming up in terms of social, and it was very exciting to be involved with something so iconic.

Most challenging part?

To me the most challenging thing in all of my internships has been balancing my schedule. Along with interning, I have a part-time job at a photography museum and I go to school full-time. I literally have one day off a week. Sometimes it can be hard to find time to breathe, but in order to get where I want to be, I know that I have to hustle.

Could you describe what a typical day is like for you as an intern?

Most days in the social media department start off with checking Ralph Lauren’s various social channels (Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, etc.). I’m mainly responsible for Pinterest so I check in with the team to see what we’re trying to achieve for the day and what needs to be pinned. Afterwards, we might have a brainstorm for a new initiative or continue working on a plan that’s almost in the execution stage. Social media is constantly changing, so each day brings something new.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Inspiring. Everyone on the social media team is great on their own, but seeing all of us come together and merge our ideas to create something that I can watch live on our social channels is so rewarding.

What advice would you give to someone just starting to look for an internship?

I would say don’t let a “no” stop you. I’ve probably applied to over 50 internships and gotten offered less than 10. Don’t be afraid of rejection. Yolo is my motto and I’m always putting myself out there for things. In the fashion industry, nothing worth having comes easy, so be ready to work hard and make connections. Once you get that internship, all of your hard work will be worth it.

What is your dream job?

This changes every week. I know that I want to work in fashion in an area that combines writing and marketing, but I’m just not sure what that job looks like exactly. Right now I’m thinking a Digital Market Editor, but tomorrow I’ll probably have a different answer.

Nov05

Career Path Interview: Online Fashion Features Editor Julia Rubin

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Julia Rubin is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and now works as the Associate Online Editor for Fashion Features at Teen Vogue. She gives insight into her internship experiences and shares some advice for students hoping to break into the ever-growing fashion industry.

During college, where did you gain internship experience?

I interned every summer in college. I interned at Yves Saint Laurent in New York for my first two summers and I was in the creative services/visual merchandising department. We were responsible for anything visual that was not designing the clothes, so that was the window displays, general store curation, what events looked like, and it was great. I loved it, but I knew I wanted to try something else. So that third summer, I spent half the week interning at Chanel in the communications department and the other half in sales and marketing at Phaidon, which is a publisher, and they have lots of really cool art and fashion and food books. I did those internships when I was in school and was always in New York, but knew that none of them were totally the right fit. During the school year, I worked for the arts and culture magazine at school, kind of like The Village Voice for Penn. So I worked there since the first day of school and rose through the ranks and eventually was the Editor-In-Chief. In my junior year I started up the campus blog. It was great. It was the point when I realized I loved writing, loved editing, and loved the Internet. Even though I interned in fashion, I was much more interested in media, and because of my background in fashion, it was easy to put the two together and start off as a fashion writer and editor.

What was the most important thing you learned from interning?

I just really loved that as an intern, you’re an observer. I’ve always been really interested in seeing how groups of people work, what structures are like, how everything works, and all the nitty gritty stuff. In terms of general skills, just seeing that the people who were the happiest were the people who were really really into what they did. That’s how my team was at YSL for example. They were all so obsessed with all the visual stuff; they lived it and breathed it. So I wanted to find something that I felt that way about because that’s why they were so good at their jobs. That’s ultimately what led me to realizing that my passion was writing and editing.

What was the most challenging part along the way during the job hunt when you were fresh out of school?

For me, the hardest thing was coming to terms with the fact that I wanted to be a writer and editor. This is a pretty difficult industry and it can be a trying thing on a personal level. So just deciding that I was going to do it and diving in head first, was definitely the scariest.

How did you land a job at Teen Vogue?

My first job out of school was with a fashion news site called Styleite. I was there for two years and I started out as an intern and was promoted a few different times. By the time I left, I was the managing editor of the site. In my first year at Styleite, I received an email from a web editor at Teen Vogue. It was really the coolest email I’ve ever gotten. She told me that she read my stuff on Styleite and she really liked my article on Karlie Kloss. We ended up keeping in touch, helping each other out and having a professional email relationship. A year later, I got an email from her saying that there was a position opening on the web team that she thought I’d be perfect for and her boss would be reaching out. And she did. The rest is history.

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

July was a very exciting month for me because a bunch of crazy things all happened at once. This was all within a matter of weeks, which was insane. I went to Berlin for a Selena Gomez event, which was really cool because I had never travelled anywhere, much less internationally, for work. That was super cool. Then I came back and found out that a feature story I had written for the magazine was green lit for an upcoming issue so I was hurrying to get that all together. It was super exciting because this was the first print story I had in the magazine and it was about teenage heroin use, which is a really crazy and important topic to cover right now. So I had to put the finishing touches on that. Also, Teen Vogue launched its video channel and I was able to be in one of the videos.  I don’t think I’m particularly good on camera but I was very flattered and really excited with how it all turned out. So it was cool to be able to do so many different things and it was very much a realization of how multi-faceted it is being at a magazine. Even though I’m on digital, I write lots of stories for the website but am still able to write for the magazine and work with video, so it was very cool to see all that come together and be a part of it.

What advice do you have for students hoping to get into this industry?

What I did was reach out to people I had some sort of connection to and really respected. The connection can be small. Reach out to people who are not total strangers and keep up with those people. Figuring out what you even like is also really important and just looking around. I found my first job from a tweet. A friend of the woman who became my boss told me to get in touch with her. It’s all just weird things like that. Always be open. Also don’t feel like you have to say yes. If you get a job opportunity that comes your way and you know that you’re not going to be happy there, don’t take it. If you genuinely think this is not something you want to do and you just want to say yes to end the job search, that’s not great. Wait until something comes along that could be an opportunity for you and a good launching point. Even if it ends up being something you don’t like, that’s okay too. Don’t be afraid to change direction. That’s okay. Get out as soon as you can. Life is too short.

Where do you see yourself in the next few years?

I think that what I’ll ultimately do, or continue to do, probably doesn’t exist right now. When I started college, the job that I had by the time I graduated did not exist. It just didn’t. When I graduated high school in 2006, the idea that you could be a paid writer and editor on the Internet, writing about fashion, going to all the same events that the print editors were going to, it was just unheard of. Those jobs just did not exist and if they did, they were very few and far between. My job at Teen Vogue didn’t exist until I started there. So I kind of have to imagine that what I do next doesn’t exist yet. The media industry is something that is just rapidly changing and the digital world really is expanding. I tell anyone who is looking to be a journalist now that there actually are more opportunities because magazine website staff keep growing and web-only places have fully fleshed-out mastheads now, which is great. I find it really encouraging.

Oct03

Sharing Wisdom: Starting Up Your Startup

Many students have dreams of working for the biggest companies in the world, while others hope to become their own bosses and turn their business ideas into companies of their own. And in today’s society, it’s more doable than ever before with the incredible growth of the innovative startup world. There are tons of great ideas floating around out there and the hardest part is often getting them off the ground and up-and-running.

We asked five startup company founders for some words of advice from their own experiences that will hopefully be that extra push you need to bring your ideas to life.

 

Aime-Designer-Monica-MeiMonica Mei, Founder of Aime Luxury, The Shop Society and WhatImWear.In (@AimeLuxury)

“Entrepreneurs have strong spirits. It’s not only about your educational background or your area of expertise; it’s about having a good idea AND the hustle needed to succeed. It’s also about surrounding yourself with the right people – your team, mentors and collaborators will be your support system to see it through. Starting your own company is a rough yet rewarding road to travel on.”

 

Alex Kolodkin, Founder of Set Scouter c23756

(@AlexKolodkin)

“Find your drive and find a mentor. Let their experiences guide you and your passion propel you.”

 

 

 

julieJulie Smithson, COO of SmithsonMartin (@SmithsonMartin)

“Yes! You have something great but don’t think that someone will drop a cheque on the table right there for you.  If accepted into the community, you have to work for your raise and learn the steps to be a start up company. ”

 

 

 

Brennan McEachran, CEO and Founder of HitSend Inc. (@i_am_brennan)Brennan

“Tip 1: Get a great team – Working at a startup is tough. There are good days and there are bad days. Going through all of that alone isn’t something most people can do. Find a team of people to go through the roller coaster with you. When you’re having a bad day they’ll carry you through it. It’s needed.

Tip 2: Focus on Customers – Get your product in the hands of your customers as early as possible. Learn from them where your app falls short and where it’s doing fine. Focus your efforts on solving pain point for your customers — just remember to take feedback with a smile and a grain of salt. Don’t forget to stick with your vision (sometimes early customers can take you off course).

Tip 3: Revenue – As much as the startup world loves to talk about investing, the truth is revenues are far more important. The companies that are able to grow large without revenue are the exception not the rule. The rule is: cash is king. Keep an eye on your cash and you’ll be able to ride through the bumps… then when investors do show up you don’t have to give them your entire company!”

 

0d20992Noura Sakkijha, Co-Founder of Mejuri (@Mejuri)

“Having a great team and knowledgeable mentors make a big difference. You have to make sure that you are looking at things from different perspectives and having a strong support structure makes it ten times easier. There are so many experienced advisers who are willing to help young entrepreneurs so do not be scared to ask for help.”

 

 

Aug20

Sharing Wisdom: Finding Career Inspiration

As students who are on your journey towards finding a long-lasting career and landing the jobs of your dreams, it’s always reassuring to see others who are doing exactly what you hope to accomplish someday—or at least something similar. Having something or someone to keep you motivated and driven is beneficial in the long run because you’ll always strive for more and it’s that extra push that can help set yourself apart from the rest. We wanted to see where some students find their own career inspiration and get insight into what keeps them going in the right direction.

 

ErikaGrahamErika Graham, Asbury University

“This is kind of weird, but I find career inspiration through my social media accounts (Instagram especially). I use social media to get a glimpse into the lives of people whose jobs I want to have, and what they do on a day-to-day business. Since I want to get into the magazine industry, I follow all the editors at all of my favorite magazines—not just the famous ones like Nina Garcia or Joe Zee, but the closet assistants and editorial assistants as well. You’d be surprised at how many tips you can pick up from Instagrammed shots of an associate market editor’s visual inspiration board or seeing what news catches their eye on Twitter.”

 

Tere Cortes, University of Texas Pan AmericanTereCortes

“I find career inspiration from a lot of different sources. From my friends, to people who I work with. I try to ask as many questions as possible, to learn different perspectives of something. I also try to read interviews and advice from people who have already the job of their dreams.”

 

 

EricZaworskiEric Zaworski, Ryerson University

“The constant flux of the Internet, and the sheer amount of people online who have started careers with it makes it hard for me to concentrate on much else. I follow so many other writers, photographers and musicians who, thanks to the Internet, have made it possible to do what they love, find others who like what they’re doing and build tangible communities, networks and careers there.

The communicative power and reach of the Internet–the ability to share, post, connect and discover, all from a pocket-sized device–makes it an exciting time to be an artist, in any capacity. And we’ve only begun to scratch the surface of what’s possible! That makes it the most exciting part.

I’m inspired by others online who have shaped their reality with the same tools I have on my desk and in my bedroom. It’s what keeps me motivated to continually push towards what I want to make out of my life.”

 

Jessica Tucker, Memorial University of NewfoundlandJessicaTucker

“I take the industries I have an interest in and learn as much as I can about them, immersing myself if possible. I am particularly inspired by successful people in these fields and read bio pieces about them in newspapers and magazines and follow them on social media platforms to gain a better understanding of what their day-to-day careers are like. I am also inspired by my friends. I think that surrounding yourself with genuine, hardworking individuals is a source of career inspiration in itself.”

 

 

SaraCastillo

Sara Castillo, University of Texas Pan American

“I always find career inspiration by reading the stories of successful people in my field. It is really interesting to hear how those people accomplished their goals by going from having nothing to finding their dream jobs. Makes me feel that I can create my own story as well and gives me motivation to overachieve, to find ways to be more involved in my career and to not settle with little things but to always aim higher. I believe that inspiration comes from your passion and how bad you want it.”

 

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Christina Dawes, The Ohio State University

“I find career inspiration from a variety of different sources. My instructors and favorite bloggers have helped shape and define my career aspirations. My peers have also inspired me with their fresh, innovative perspective on fashion. With the fashion industry forever growing, there are new job positions being created each day. My career path is inspired by the dynamic people who are using passion and originality to create their dream jobs.”

Jul25

Get Inspired

It can be hard to see the bigger picture when you’re trying trying to balance a hectic class schedule with job hunting, but sometimes all you need is a little push and proof that hard work goes a long way.

We took to YouTube to find some words of wisdom that will hopefully inspire you to get you up on your feet and take on the world.

My personal favorite it the message from Kid President — what a great kid. Time to get out there and tackle those goals and achieve those dreams!

Jul16

Intern Spotlight: Kristen Higuera

DSC_0518Interviewee Name: Kristen Higuera

Intern Position Title: A&R/Marketing Intern

Company Name: A&M/Octone Records

Location: New York, New York

Tell us a bit about yourself:

I am going into my senior year at Texas A&M University pursuing a degree in Communications with a minor in art. Oh, and I really like music.

 

CreativeInterns: Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

Kristen Higuera: Lots and lots of research. With A&M/Octone, I had a phone interview then a Skype interview…and before I knew it I was on a plane headed to NYC.

CI: What attracted you to this company?

KH: A&M/Octone’s artist roster is extremely diverse. I felt that I could get a taste of what it is like to work with various genres instead of just one.

CI: What skills are you learning while at your internship?

KH: It is a very hands-on experience filled with brainstorming sessions and production meetings. I’m learning a lot about the logistics that go into keeping up with each and every artist signed to the label.

CI: Can you describe what a normal day is for an intern at your company?

KH: There really isn’t a “normal day” at the office and I love that. Everyday when I walk in at 10am, I never know what I might do or where I might be. I have gotten the chance to go on some really cool adventures to places like Jimi Hendrix’s Electric Lady Studios, Spotify, and MTV.

CI: How would you describe your workplace environment in three words or less?

KH: Laid back.

CI: What advice would you give to someone just DSC_0524starting to look for an internship?

KH: Decide what to be and go be it.

CI: What do you do to fill the inspiration gas tank?

KH: Nothing is more inspiring then an adventure with some swell tunes and good company.

CI: What’s next for you?

KH: We’ll see..

CI: What’s your dream job?

I am film and music enthusiast, so eventually I hope to find myself making the soundtracks for movies and TV shows.

Jul11

Sharing Wisdom: Tips From 8 Interns

With any internship experience, whether you’re just doing it for college credit or want to network your way into your dream job, you’re going to want to make the most out of it. How you might ask? If you’re new to the world of interning and need a bit of guidance, here are eight hardworking interns who were kind enough to share their wisdom.

We asked: What is the most important thing you’ve learned from an internship?

Christian Allaire, Ryerson University486572_4190918585353_1641567635_n

“Go after what you want. In a time when companies are increasingly relying on the help of interns, it’s not always easy getting to do everything you had hoped to do during your internship. So on top of being an asset to your workplace, you should also make personal objectives for yourself as well – whether that’s exploring the different departments or building relationships with editors.”

1059402_10151705432759875_1799658392_nNaomi Leanage, University of Guelph-Humber

The most important thing I’ve learned from an internship is that going above and beyond of what’s expected of you is what’s going to make you get noticed. There are dozens of other interns with the same skills and knowledge that you have, and the one thing that will make you stand out is your passion! At my internship at Tribute, I made an effort to check in with my editor everyday to chat, even about things that didn’t relate to tasks that I was working on. It helped build a relationship with her, and I’m for sure someone she’ll remember in a line of ever-changing interns. I also made sure to express my interests (doing interviews, writing movie reviews) and because of that, I’ve gotten opportunities in two weeks that other interns had to wait months to receive. It’s important not to be intimidated, and if you have a great idea, to go ahead and pitch it!

Erin McHenry, Drake Universityerin

“After interning as a communications intern for a government agency, I learned that I’m NOT interested in corporate communication the government . I learned a lot and greatly improved my writing skills, which will be helpful for any job I take. Even if you don’t enjoy an internship you still learn something: It’s not the right place for you, and you’re one step closer to finding your perfect job.”

DSC_0298Kaela Popoff, Kwantlen University

“The key thing I learned from my internship was the importance of communication. Checking in with your supervisors or boss about where you are at with your work and what you’ve completed helps them know how much work to give you. This way you’re never swamped nor bored, and you can meet your deadlines!”

 

Catherine Dugas, Fashion Institute of Technology1060927_10151707634803874_1698531869_n

“The most valuable thing I’ve learned from interning has to be that organization and attention to detail are key. There are so many small details that go into running a big company and they truly make all the difference. If you aren’t naturally organized, make sure to use an agenda and download organization apps on your phone keep you on point!”

Dun011112 - Version 2Hillary MacDonald, Ryerson University

“Listen, observe and pick the brains of those who work in positions that you would like to one day have.”

 

 

Kristin Doherty, Drake UniversityDoherty1

“What I’ve learned most is how important it is to work as a team with your coworkers and fellow interns. At the beginning of my internship, I felt a little competitive about who was getting the best assignments or doing the best job. But now I realize that we’re all working toward the same team goals. It’s more important for each of us to play to our strengths for the benefit of the team than to compete with each other for recognition or attention.”

DSC_0151 - Version 2Terrence Freeman, Humber College

“The most important thing I have learned from my internship so far is that things are rarely black and white, and you have to expect the unexpected. You have to figure a lot of things out on your own as you go, and you will likely run into dilemmas and have to figure out a lot on the spot without the help of your bosses who are often busy, or may not be there to help such as in a case where you are out of the office running an errand. I’ve now learned to expect to run into slight dilemmas here and there, so I try to ask my bosses an many questions as possible when I can before a task, and I also try to understand and remember what my bosses would want or do in the situation.”