Tag Archives: career

Sep07

Advice for Internships By Samantha Lauro

Samantha Lauro

You Were Chosen For a Reason:

Every person has the quintessential, “I don’t know what I am doing” feeling when they start a new job. It is only natural, as you’re in a completely new environment consisting of client approval rather than grade percentiles. There will definitely be moments that challenge you and even make you question your chosen career path. Your most important asset is how the anxiety is managed, as what ultimately defines the situation is the end result. Therefore look at the long run rather than getting caught up in the moment.

Morning Routine:

I suggest treating yourself to a coffee, or general beverage/snack, at least once a week to keep your mornings interesting. This especially goes for those who commute; not only does it expose you to new locations around the city, but it also takes the mindlessness out of the daily routine. I am a self-proclaimed, or self-diagnosed, caffeine addict so to me this is essential.

What to Wear: 

Attire is important. It is the first impression people have of you and sets the tone. The rule of thumb is usually, dress a level beyond the position you are aiming for. I concur, but my personal thought is that one must gage the social climate and dress appropriately. In other words, integrate yourself with the office culture but maintain a professional appearance. If your place of work is on the casual side, I recommend mixing professional and dressed down pieces to keep the balance.

Going to a Work Event:

This is a great opportunity to get to know co-workers. Be social and make connections. It may be intimidating but I have found most people to be open and friendly, plus casual conversation is a great way to gain insight on the field you are embarking in. Be yourself and be genuine; at the end of the day a real relationship is far more important than a list of completed office tasks or superficial conversation. Enjoy yourself!

Stay Off Your Phone:

To become fully involved and connected with jobs and accounts one should avoid distractions. Put the phone down and get the full experience. Use 100% of your mental capacity and it will pay off with regard to work quality and work relationships.

Junior Associate Mentality:

Think of yourself as a junior associate rather than an intern. People will tell you not to sweat it because “you are only an intern” but I say rise to the occasion. Don’t give yourself a proverbial out. You are working at a real company and the work you do will have an impact in some way, especially if you elevate your thinking.

Meetings:

Pay attention to details and take notes. Observe and absorb the general information and the essence of the gathering. Note the interaction, strategy, attitude, posture, and language. There are so many external and intrinsic lessons to learn, as meetings show thought process, culture, and final result. Always have an opinion about what is being said, and try to contribute when appropriate. You never know when you will be asked about your thoughts, therefore, listening intently is key. Additionally, ask questions to show that you are attentive and interested in learning. If you are nervous ask questions after the meeting or through a follow up email.

When in Doubt, Go for It:

There will be quite a few times during an internship where the opportunity to go beyond what is expected presents itself. Many times it means putting oneself on the line or taking a chance. Admittedly, this is pretty scary especially in a new place. Personal examples of this included emailing my thoughts on an account after sitting in on a meeting, creating a POV, presenting an idea to an art director, and asserting my opinion despite the fact that it challenged the idea of another co-worker. Before every decision I contemplated whether or not I should act, and I went for it. I can say with confidence that it was worth it, as each became a personal victory despite varying degrees of success. Take a chance on yourself, it will pay off and show initiative.

Don’t be Afraid to Stay Late:

Staying late can be daunting. If there comes a time where you need to stay late to get something done embrace it; buckle down and get to work. You want to show your team that you are dependable and dedicated, therefore don’t run out of the office at 5:00pm on the dot. In the process of staying late you may even meet some coworkers who you would not have met during the day. Additionally, if you are working on a project for someone, always check with them before you head out for the day.

Commuting:

Commuting is exhausting and can be mind-numbing. A good percentage of the time I was passed out on LIRR, but for the days when my mind was left wandering I often searched for a way to pass the time. I suggest making a playlists to keep it fun; good music makes every situation better. I also recommend podcasts, as they are a great way to wake up your mind for the workday.

Time Management:

One will quickly realize that time is fleeting, especially if there is an abundance of work to be done. Stay on top of your work and things will run smoothly. Additionally, quality is essential so do not rush through your tasks at hand. It can be hard to say no to projects when multiple people come to you for help at the same time. If you think you can handle more work then go for it, but do not take on more responsibility if quality of work will suffer. It helps to know deadlines and be open; ask your supervisors when things are due and create an open dialogue. Lastly, keep a schedule to keep track of jobs.

Carry a Notebook:

I am a firm believer in carrying a notebook at all times during an internship. You can record what is going on, keep track of work and information, and have a daily account of your internship experience. It is also great for writing down ideas when inspiration strikes.

Work Quality:

Quality on one task can determine whether people will come to you for other jobs. Put in maximum effort. Also, do not be afraid to ask questions, as an internship should be about developing your skills.

Be Hungry:

An internship is a learning experience. Strive to learn as much as possible, and experience all that you can. Ask to attend meetings, look for work, volunteer, and enquire about opinions. Be assertive, in a mature way, and you shall receive.

Think Outside of the Box:

Creative thinking is valuable. As an outsider you do not have preconceived notions/stigmas from the industry and are not assimilated to the general way of thinking. Moreover, you hold a fresh perspective and come from a place of different experiences. Use this to your benefit and go against the grain. Also, some of the most wacky and outrageous ideas can be the best, or at the very least can stimulate thought, so make sure to speak up.

End of Internship:

Meet with your supervisor one last time before you leave to debrief. It can be a great way to gain valuable feedback on your performance and can showcase your progress. Be sure to thank your supervisor, as graciousness goes a long way.

 

Feb28

Can Elocution lessons get you ahead in life?

Elocution Lessons

The UK is home to a wealth of distinguishable, often charming regional accents that can instantly tell you where a person is from and give you an insight into their heritage and background, without you knowing anything about them. Many people are proud of their accents. They are a part of their identity and, in many ways, part of their character.

Dialects

However, with many regions adopting a number of dialect specific words that only mean something to that particular region, it’s easy to see why accents present progression barriers when it comes to securing your chosen career, especially if it involves speaking publicly.

With many stronger accents difficult to understand for people from other regions and countries, it has led many to wonder if elocution lessons are the answer? And will they get us ahead in life?

It’s a topic that divides the nation but, with many companies now put off by strong regional accents due to the fear that the customers they will be communicating with will simply not understand them, should elocution lessons be viewed as a means of getting our dream job or is it a form of discrimination?

At one time, regional dialects were seen as fashionable. In fact, many regions have relied on them heavily as a way of retaining the reputation of its area. For example, Geordie Duo, Ant and Dec played a crucial role in glamorising phrases taken from their regional dialect including “Well Aye, which signaled a trend for the entire nation to adopt Newcastle’s affectionate use of slang.

Unfortunately, social stereotypes tend to deem regional accents as common, causing them to be an immediate handicap when it comes to securing high-flying jobs in the capital!

With a strong focus on using what is referred to the as the ‘Queen’s English’ or Received Pronunciation, many people have turned to elocution lessons to help them to finely tune their accents.

Elocution lessons

If you decide that you need elocution lessons that are an extensive range of highly qualified tutors out there, who can help you to fix the rough edges of your accent or make subtle vocal changes that will provide you with increased opportunities when it comes to bagging the job that you want. Firsttutors are a well-known option for this service.

And it’s not just politicians, doctors, lawyers and other influential people in the public eye who invest in elocution lessons.

Elocution teachers also help you to execute yourself confidently in demanding situations when you have to speak publicly to large audiences, or deliver presentations on a regular basis. It might be that you need help when it comes to slowing down when reading, pronouncing your vowels effectively, or simply making more of an impact with the words and messages that you are trying to get across to people.

Many of the nation’s favorite celebrities have had to receive elocution lessons. One famous example is Cat Deeley, who sought the help of an elocution coach after fears that she could potentially have lost her TV presenting job in the US due to her strong Birmingham accent.

On the other hand, many celebrities such as Cheryl Cole, who famously lost a job in the American version of the X Factor after fears that the audience could not understand her strong Newcastle accent, refuse to lose their regional accents and dialects.

So what’s the verdict? Do you stand loud and proud of your accent or do you think that people who have jobs where they are communicating with all segments of the British public should receive elocution lessons if they have a strong accent?

 

 

 

Oct01

How to Prepare for Career Internships & Job Fair Season

career fair

A new school year has arrived, fall is rapidly approaching and students across the country are getting ready to put on their best suits and fill the lines at internships and job fairs. For some students, they are readily prepared for these fairs and how to strategically tackle them. For others, this may be there first time and they may need a little help. Here are some great tips to use to tackle an internship and job fair…

Make a target list

A student who navigates a career fair well is a strategic student. Make a target list of the companies you are interested in. Your list should be separated into three parts based on the jobs and internships they are providing and your qualifications: your reach companies, your priority companies and your safety companies.

Your reach companies are those that you are highly interested in, but might not necessarily have a job offer for you or you don’t meet the qualifications. Your priority companies are the ones you are highly interested in and you meet the qualifications, and they are even looking to fill immediately. Your safety companies are those that slightly peaked your interest and you meet some of the qualifications.

Know your 30 second pitch

Giving a firm handshake and introducing yourself well is a way to leave a lasting impression. For the employer, the 30 second pitch, also known as the elevator pitch, is a way to see how well you can present yourself in a limited time and to see your level of professionalism. Your 30 second pitch should include who you are and what you can bring to the table. In an article on forbes.com, the contributor states that the employer “will have their antennas tuned to ‘what’s in it for me?'”

Research companies

You just dropped your 30 second pitch mentioning what you can bring to the table and the employer is impressed. The next thing they want to see is how well you know their company. This is a career fair and you will have some students going from table to table dropping their resumes off without any knowledge of the company. Set yourself apart and do the research. If this is a digital marketing position, know there latest digital campaigns, know who the department director is and what they’ve done for the company. The more you know, the better.

Know the floor plan

One of the worst things you can do at a career fair is waste your time looking for that particular booth. As a student, you are juggling your class schedule, extracurricular activities and maybe even your work-study job. You want to be able to put as much time in speaking with employers and not getting lost. Most college career fairs provide a floor plan online or at the door. Take a moment to highlight where the companies that you want to visit are located. Visit your priority companies first and then your reach companies. Save your safeties for last.

 

How are you preparing for the career internships and job fair season? Leave a comment below!

May13

4 Ways to Land a Social Media Internship

social media intern

The growth of social media has led to an increase in internships and opportunities. The rise of internships and opportunities also means an increase in competition. Stand out from the pack by adapting these 4 different ways to land a social media internship.

Use your social media accounts for professional good

According to CareerBuilder, 37% of companies search for potential job candidates on social media. With that said, use your social media accounts for professional good and successfully set up your digital footprint. Think about it, why would a company hire an individual to handle their social media platforms if they can’t handle their own? Companies are looking for individuals who are active on social media, transparent and yet professional.

Create a Portfolio

An online portfolio showcasing your work is a great way to set your self apart from others who are still depending on the traditional resume. Whether it’s your own dot com website or a video reel, you should have a shareable online portfolio that showcases your qualifications and experiences.

Superb writing skills

Knowing how to creatively weave a sentence together is a great skill to have when working in social media. Not only to mention, great grammar skills! A great social media intern knows how to get a message across in their writing and are also able to communicate well in short-form writing. Jonathan Sexton, CEO of socialgladiator.com says, “To me, someone with a good sense of wit and charm in their writing is appealing. Some of the best brands in social media have that combination and it’s attractive to users.”

Learn the responsibilities of a social media intern

Many neglect to understand that interning or working in social media is far more than updating your company’s Facebook status. It is also about math and understanding network analytics, data mining, research and content marketing. If you really want to stand out, learn how to use the Adobe Creative Suite. The programs included can help to enhance a company’s online community without outsourcing or hiring another individual.

 

Apr23

Career Spotlight: Darnisha Bishop

Darnisha Bishop Darnisha is a seasoned professional with over 4 years of public relations and social media experience. Starting her career in Public Relations for an entertainment company, Darnisha gradually transitioned into the digital realm, focusing more on social media strategies. As an Assistant Social Advertising Planner at Neo@Ogilvy in New York City, she creates and executes paid social media strategies to help clients generate leads, increase brand awareness and consumer engagement. We had the chance to ask Darnisha a few questions about her role at Neo@Ogilvy and her life as a PR and social media professional. Creative Interns: What is it like being a paid social advertising planner at a global agency? Darnisha Bishop: My day-to-day is very unpredictable and heavily depends on the different campaigns that are running. Some days, I am planning how to execute paid strategies on multiple social media platforms, and other days I am spending time contributing to thought leadership pieces that help to educate my client about the benefits of incorporating paid social media strategies into their overall social strategies. CI: What made you chose a career path in social media and digital communications? DB: Social media is something I naturally gravitated toward over the years, so I guess you could say social media chose me! Having started my career in PR, I understood the benefits of incorporating social media strategies into the overall brand strategy. As time went on, I became more and more knowledgeable of social media and stayed current on evolving trends. It’s such a fun industry to be a part of, and it is constantly surprising me! CI: For news and updates in social media, what are your go-to resources and websites? DB: My list is long (very long). My top three are:

CI: What advice would you give students looking to enter your field? DB:

  • Stay on top of what is happening in the industry. Social media is big, and constantly evolving. New trends, apps, strategies pop up almost every day and it’s important to fully understand what is going on.
  • Internships are a great way to get hands on experience. I recommend starting out as an intern at an agency that specializes in social media strategies (whether it’s paid or organic). You’ll have a great understanding of how everything works, and will have access to amazing resources that will help you to continue to learn and grow.
  • Don’t be afraid to get out there and introduce yourself to different industry professionals. Networking is key! It is a great way to learn more about opportunities in social media.

CI: How do you see the social and digital media landscape evolving over the next five years? DB: We’re already seeing a drastic shift from desktop to mobile usage. Users are taking to their smartphones and tablets to access and share information on social networks. The next step will be social networks paying more attention to the needs of their users, and making their experience a more personalized one. Facebook has already begun this with their updated algorithm, organically generating content that they know their users will find valuable based on previous behaviors. Other platforms, like Twitter, for example, are following their lead. It will be interesting to see how each of the platforms begins to evolve in this direction. To learn more about Darnisha’s career path, connect with her on Twitter or LinkedIn.

Mar24

Career Spotlight: Katie Robinson

Katie RobinsonKatie Robinson is a young creative talent who functions as the Administrative Assistant to the Vice President of Production Management at Sesame Street, assisting with the production needs of Street Story, Crumby Pictures Presents, Super Grover and Elmo the Musical segments. In her spare time, she runs Ask the Young Professional, a site for the “savvy twentysomething.” We caught up with Katie to talk about her career in, and passion for, production management.
Creative Interns: What specifically motivated you to go this direction in your career?
 
Katie Robinson: I had a really great communications program at Fitchburg State University where I was able to experience a variety of film/video positions hands on. It was through this trial and error period that I was able to narrow down my strengths, weaknesses, what I liked and what I didn’t like. I discovered that my passion really lied within Production Management. I could see myself working towards being a Producer, Assistant Director or Stage Manager based off the experience I had and the skill-sets I knew these positions required. I was really lucky that I knew this about myself early on because it gave me the drive to pursue these areas while still in school. This also lead me to my internship with Sesame Workshop which is where I got my first job. The rest has been a combination of seizing opportunities and working off the adrenalin of doing something I love.
 
CI: Sesame Workshop promotes educational learning through television and media. As an assistant in production management, what is your day-to-day like in promoting the mission of the Sesame Workshop?
 
KR: My main focus in my position is to make sure everyone is able to carry out their duties fully. The day to day specifics vary, but the range can be from simple set ups and scheduling meetings, to helping with keeping track of financial records, to assisting with the planning and production of larger events. I look at my job as a connector piece that helps all the big pieces work together. Without my position, details would get left behind or precocious time would be taken away from the big picture projects.
 
CI: For film and production management news and advice, what are your go-to resources?
 
KR: Honestly, my first go to is people. I learn so much more by talking to people. There is something to be said about the personal connection and information people can give you. Then, there are always great sites like Variety and The Hollywood Report that give you pretty much everything you need to know about what is happening currently. I have their apps on my iPhone and follow them on Twitter to stay up to date as well.
 
CI: What tips can you provide a college student, recent graduate or entry-level talent looking to embark on your career path? 
 
There are two things you should always be doing: talking to people and gathering experience. Networking is really how you will get your jobs, especially since it’s such a freelance-heavy field. Even if you’re not working you can be gaining experience by creating on your own. Whether you’re writing, producing, directing, or filming the creative work you do will keep your momentum going, keep your skills fresh and give you more work examples to share.
 
KR: What is your dream job?
 
This is always a tough question because even though “Producer, Assistant Director or Stage Manager” is always my default answer, I’m also very open to seeing where my career path takes me. I’ve heard from so many people who have been working in the industry for at least twenty years now how they never thought they’d get to where they are now through the path they took. One job lead to the next and then eventually they ended up in a position they really loved and are doing really well for themselves. I think a real dream job for me would be one where I can work to bring collaborative creative minds together to make one final piece and be involved in the pre-production and production process.
To further connect with Katie, tweet with her on Twitter, connect with her on LinkedIn or follow her on Instagram.
Mar21

The Art of Building Relationships 2.0: The Human Touch

building relationships

Back in December, I created a post about the art of building authentic relationships and moving away from just “networking.” As any blog post, the topic evolves and from a conversation with my good friend/kindred sister, “The Art of Building Relationships 2.0: The Human Touch” was born.

We understand that building relationships based on shared interests and values are far more important than networking (seeking the benefits). However, in our “always on” and connected world many of us believe relationships can be built over social media, texts, Skype chats and more. Technology is a great way to connect and communicate, but relationships should be enhanced through face to face interaction.

Lunch Meetings

Lunch meetings are a great way to have face to face interaction, talk business and connect based on similarities. Schedule lunch meetings during your lunchtime (if you can) or even on the weekends. I have built many relationships, in and out of my industry, over good lunch or even coffee. Remember, lunch meetings create a shared experience and you are not tied to a lofty meeting agenda like you would be if you met in the office.

Here are some of my favorite spots for lunch meetings and catch-ups:

Republic (Union Square)
Vapiano (Union Square)
Argo Tea

Attend Other Industry Events

If you’re in tech and digital, you don’t always have to attend tech and digital events. Again, relationships are fostered out of shared interests and values. If you love film, head out to different film festivals and conferences. If you are a digital professional who is health conscious, go to a health meet-up in your city. Whatever event, conference or seminar you attend, you are bound to build a relationship with someone with similar passions.

Get off the Internet. Go on an Adventure.

Yes, twitter chats, online meetups and interactive webinars are a great way to meet new people. But how can a real relationship be built if both parties are hidden behind their computer, laptop or tablet? Get off the Internet and go on an adventure. Take that online meet-up offline and meet for a day hike, trust building activities or even a scavenger hunt.

What are some other ways to build authentic relationships from human to human interaction?

Nov05

Career Path Interview: Online Fashion Features Editor Julia Rubin

38-julia-rubin-photojennamariewakani

Julia Rubin is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and now works as the Associate Online Editor for Fashion Features at Teen Vogue. She gives insight into her internship experiences and shares some advice for students hoping to break into the ever-growing fashion industry.

During college, where did you gain internship experience?

I interned every summer in college. I interned at Yves Saint Laurent in New York for my first two summers and I was in the creative services/visual merchandising department. We were responsible for anything visual that was not designing the clothes, so that was the window displays, general store curation, what events looked like, and it was great. I loved it, but I knew I wanted to try something else. So that third summer, I spent half the week interning at Chanel in the communications department and the other half in sales and marketing at Phaidon, which is a publisher, and they have lots of really cool art and fashion and food books. I did those internships when I was in school and was always in New York, but knew that none of them were totally the right fit. During the school year, I worked for the arts and culture magazine at school, kind of like The Village Voice for Penn. So I worked there since the first day of school and rose through the ranks and eventually was the Editor-In-Chief. In my junior year I started up the campus blog. It was great. It was the point when I realized I loved writing, loved editing, and loved the Internet. Even though I interned in fashion, I was much more interested in media, and because of my background in fashion, it was easy to put the two together and start off as a fashion writer and editor.

What was the most important thing you learned from interning?

I just really loved that as an intern, you’re an observer. I’ve always been really interested in seeing how groups of people work, what structures are like, how everything works, and all the nitty gritty stuff. In terms of general skills, just seeing that the people who were the happiest were the people who were really really into what they did. That’s how my team was at YSL for example. They were all so obsessed with all the visual stuff; they lived it and breathed it. So I wanted to find something that I felt that way about because that’s why they were so good at their jobs. That’s ultimately what led me to realizing that my passion was writing and editing.

What was the most challenging part along the way during the job hunt when you were fresh out of school?

For me, the hardest thing was coming to terms with the fact that I wanted to be a writer and editor. This is a pretty difficult industry and it can be a trying thing on a personal level. So just deciding that I was going to do it and diving in head first, was definitely the scariest.

How did you land a job at Teen Vogue?

My first job out of school was with a fashion news site called Styleite. I was there for two years and I started out as an intern and was promoted a few different times. By the time I left, I was the managing editor of the site. In my first year at Styleite, I received an email from a web editor at Teen Vogue. It was really the coolest email I’ve ever gotten. She told me that she read my stuff on Styleite and she really liked my article on Karlie Kloss. We ended up keeping in touch, helping each other out and having a professional email relationship. A year later, I got an email from her saying that there was a position opening on the web team that she thought I’d be perfect for and her boss would be reaching out. And she did. The rest is history.

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

July was a very exciting month for me because a bunch of crazy things all happened at once. This was all within a matter of weeks, which was insane. I went to Berlin for a Selena Gomez event, which was really cool because I had never travelled anywhere, much less internationally, for work. That was super cool. Then I came back and found out that a feature story I had written for the magazine was green lit for an upcoming issue so I was hurrying to get that all together. It was super exciting because this was the first print story I had in the magazine and it was about teenage heroin use, which is a really crazy and important topic to cover right now. So I had to put the finishing touches on that. Also, Teen Vogue launched its video channel and I was able to be in one of the videos.  I don’t think I’m particularly good on camera but I was very flattered and really excited with how it all turned out. So it was cool to be able to do so many different things and it was very much a realization of how multi-faceted it is being at a magazine. Even though I’m on digital, I write lots of stories for the website but am still able to write for the magazine and work with video, so it was very cool to see all that come together and be a part of it.

What advice do you have for students hoping to get into this industry?

What I did was reach out to people I had some sort of connection to and really respected. The connection can be small. Reach out to people who are not total strangers and keep up with those people. Figuring out what you even like is also really important and just looking around. I found my first job from a tweet. A friend of the woman who became my boss told me to get in touch with her. It’s all just weird things like that. Always be open. Also don’t feel like you have to say yes. If you get a job opportunity that comes your way and you know that you’re not going to be happy there, don’t take it. If you genuinely think this is not something you want to do and you just want to say yes to end the job search, that’s not great. Wait until something comes along that could be an opportunity for you and a good launching point. Even if it ends up being something you don’t like, that’s okay too. Don’t be afraid to change direction. That’s okay. Get out as soon as you can. Life is too short.

Where do you see yourself in the next few years?

I think that what I’ll ultimately do, or continue to do, probably doesn’t exist right now. When I started college, the job that I had by the time I graduated did not exist. It just didn’t. When I graduated high school in 2006, the idea that you could be a paid writer and editor on the Internet, writing about fashion, going to all the same events that the print editors were going to, it was just unheard of. Those jobs just did not exist and if they did, they were very few and far between. My job at Teen Vogue didn’t exist until I started there. So I kind of have to imagine that what I do next doesn’t exist yet. The media industry is something that is just rapidly changing and the digital world really is expanding. I tell anyone who is looking to be a journalist now that there actually are more opportunities because magazine website staff keep growing and web-only places have fully fleshed-out mastheads now, which is great. I find it really encouraging.

Oct09

Tips on Saving Money as an Intern by Diane Ly

Free-Money-2013-edition

The cold, hard truth is that most internships these days are unpaid or paid very little. That’s why as an intern, it’s crucial to be smart with your money and only spend on things you need. Here are some tips that got me through my unpaid internship days:

Bring your lunch: An average lunch costs at least $10, and if you’re interning three days a week, that’s $30 down the drain. A good way to take care of lunch is to make a big dinner the night before and save some to pack for the next day. Sandwiches are another filling and affordable way to make sure you’re eating a lunch everyday – a trip to the grocery’s worth of supplies can last you weeks!

Drink your morning coffee at home: There’s really no need to stop at a café every morning for your coffee. Buy some coffee grounds for $5-7 and have a morning cup of joe without shelling out cash at the start of each day. Spending that early in the morning will only limit what you can buy for the rest of the day.

Ask if your company will help with transportation costs: In New York City, it’s typical that a company will help you out with transportation by giving you a Metrocard to cover your trips to and from site; if they’re extra generous they’ll cover the entire month (which costs about $105 for an unlimited pass). Outside of NY, I’ve heard of many places offering reimbursements for gas to and from the workplace.

Unsubscribe from shopping e-mails: This one’s definitely a personal tip 🙂 Ever since I opted out of e-mails from websites like Gilt Groupe and Fab.com I haven’t found myself shopping online at all, which, let’s be honest, is a downfall for many of us. Getting rid of opportunities like that helps more than you think. Out of sight, out of mind…and nowhere near my wallet!

Oct08

Success Story: Landing The Job

I’m sure all of you have goals of getting hired after completing an internship. For many students in such a competitive industry, it’s hard to do. But this passionate and hardworking graduate managed to go from a Style Guru intern to Social Media Director at CollegeFashionista. Meet Sammy Luterbach and find out how she did it.

 

Sammy1Tell us a bit about yourself.

Growing up, I always knew I wanted to move to New York City and work in fashion. To skip over a lot of blood, sweat and tears and make a long story short, I did just that. Along the way, I discovered my love for cats, leopard print, and legal pads.

How did you first land your internship with CollegeFashionista?

Before I started school at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, I made a day trip to the city with friends to try to find a job. A boutique I wanted to work at wasn’t hiring, but one of the employees there wrote for CollegeFashionista. She asked to take my friend’s photo for the site, and I was immediately intrigued. I asked her about CollegeFashionista and checked it out the second I was near a computer (pre-iPhone; yikes!).

After finding out this was an online internship I could be a part of, I emailed Amy Levin, founder of CollegeFashionista, directly asking how I could get involved. We set up a phone interview, and the rest is history. I became a Style Guru one month after the site was launched four years ago.

What attracted you to this company?

I love fashion, and I love writing, so the fact that CollegeFashionista combined both initially attracted me to the company. The longer I worked and the more CollegeFashionista expanded though, I loved that I didn’t have to be in New York City to feel connected to the industry. By interning for CollegeFashionista, I could be in college in the middle of Wisconsin, work from my apartment and be a part of a fashion movement with other people like me.

What skills did you learn during your internship?

I always like writing, but CollegeFashionista helped me explore more of a journalistic approach. Although I’m not a strong photographer, I definitely learned more about photography and became better throughout the years. Most importantly for me, I learned all about social media. I specifically remember the conversation years ago where Amy convinced me to sign up for Twitter! On top of that, I improved my leadership skills, developed more of a business mind and even did some event planning. Through everything I did with CollegeFashionista, I gained confidence and a voice.

How long did you intern with CollegeFashionista?

Almost four years! I began in September of 2009 as a Style Guru and worked continuously until I moved to New York and started working for the company this past July.

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What was the most valuable thing you took from your internship experience?

Be genuine. There are so many people who will be catty, competitive and show-offy to fight to the top, but that will only get them so far. Hard work and passion will get you to where you need to be. Also, never expect that you think you know it all. Before CollegeFashionista, I thought I wanted to be a designer! This internship helped me learn otherwise.

How did you turn your internship into a job?

Turning my internship into a job at CollegeFashionista wasn’t something I planned for, although I definitely dreamed about it! I was the first employee to be hired by the Levin family, so I didn’t have anyone to emulate. I just fully dedicated myself to CollegeFashionista and always asked for more work. I tried to go above and beyond what was asked of me. I became an important part of the team through my work and passion for the company.

What role do you have within the company now?

I am the Social Media Director and Editorial Assistant. I manage all of CollegeFashionista’s social media platforms, operate the newsletter, help with special features on the website and work with the Head Style Gurus to spread the word about CollegeFashionista on campuses all over. Plus, there are always extra projects that come up on a daily basis depending on what’s happening in the office and on the site!

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment.

Dynamic. Everyday is different in the office, but it’s always fast-paced and full of energy. We work extremely hard but also manage to find the time for candy breaks and fun music.

What advice do you have for other interns?

Be genuine, work really hard and always say yes – you’ll figure out how to get it all done.