Tag Archives: california to new york city

Jun26

5 Things to Do After a Job Interview

Follow-Up

You just had a great interview, and you think to yourself “this is it” — it’s the end of the process. You go home to hope and wait for the good news. However, it’s not over yet, so don’t just passively wait. Make sure you do the following things after the interview to maximize your chances of being hired.

Get the Interviewer’s Contact Information

At the end of the interview, always remember to obtain the business card of the people who you interviewed with. Make sure you have the cards of everyone you’ve met during the interview and have all their names, titles, emails, and mailing addresses correct.

Ask for Expected Decision-Making Time

It’s also important to ask at the end of the interview about a time when the final hiring decision will be made. Usually the decision takes about 1-2 weeks. However, some might take 3-4 months or even longer. Be sure to receive a clear answer from the company so that you can have more control and flexibility to arrange your future availability.

Send a Thank You Letter

A thank you letter is very important — it shows your interest and passion for the company. Make sure to send the thank you letter within 72 hours after your interview. It doesn’t really matter if it is a handwritten thank you card or a thank you email. Although a personal card is preferable, an email also works if you don’t have much time. Your thank you letter should include your appreciation of the interviewer’s time and interest, a reiteration of your capability for the position, and your desire for a further discussion with them. You should also personalize your thank you letter to every recipient by referencing something memorable or specific. See How to Write a Professional Thank You Letter.

Send a Follow-Up Email

Normally, one or two weeks after the interview is a good period of time to send a follow-up email if you haven’t heard anything. The follow-up email should be short and contain your inquiry of the current application status and whether the position has been filled. Make sure to restate your qualifications and why you think you are the good fit in the company at the end of the email. Learn more about this and other job search tips in Jumpstart Your Creative Career.

Make a Follow-Up Phone Call

If you still haven’t heard back from the company after sending the follow-up email, you might want to consider a phone call. Although many companies try to avoid job inquiry phone calls, it never hurts to give it a try. Maintain a professional phone etiquette, speak clearly about your desire and interest in the position, and ask if they need any further information from you. If no one picks up the phone, leave a voicemail and try to call again on another day. But don’t call more than three times — the hiring manager could get annoyed and it could backfire on you.

Written by Cathy Qiu

Jun08

Tips For Your Internship by Morgan Sobel

College_graduate_students

Be A Sponge

Interning is the best way to gain some real world experience before jumping into the work force, so learn all you can! Ask plenty of questions, and ask for help if you’re unsure of what you’re doing. Gaining knowledge and confidence is a surefire way to ace your internship and help you land your dream job.

Ask to Help

If you’re experiencing some downtime during your internship, don’t sit around checking your email. It doesn’t hurt to offer your services to those around you. You may just gain an opportunity to work on something really great, and proving yourself a valuable part of the team may work out in the long run.

Introduce Yourself

The office can be a a confusing (and sometimes lonely) place if you don’t know your neighbors. Take a moment to say “hello” to your fellow creatives, let them know who you are and why you’re there. Even if you don’t work with them all the time, remembering names and positions is a good thing to do. Besides being polite, you may make some great connections you otherwise wouldn’t have.

Carry a Notepad

…Or a tablet, if that’s your thing. Your internship will keep you on your toes, and you never know when your next great idea (or next important question) will pop into your head, so keeping a sketchbook or notepad for notes can come in handy. Especially for the person that has an extensive post-it note collection, having all your notes in a book can help to keep you organized and collected.

Smile

A little personality can go a long way, it makes the people around you more comfortable, and makes you more memorable too. It may sound ridiculous, but sometimes a good disposition is the difference between getting the job or not. People would much rather be around someone with a positive attitude, and this goes for outside of the workplace as well.

Show Up on Time

Creatives are notorious for showing up to work late, but I wouldn’t recommend trying to get away with it just yet. The same goes for taking breaks too. It sounds obvious, but it’s really important – show up ready and on time, It’s one of the best ways to show your willingness and dedication to your new internship.

Watch Your Web Use

You can find out anything on the internet, so it’s time to think about what you’re putting out there. Photos and words can come back to haunt you, so It may be time to clean up your web presence. You should also think twice before complaining about your job or a co-worker, there’s a good chance someone can find it. Companies search their name for recent news all the time, so think before you tweet!

Written by Morgan Sobel

May23

Flore Dorcely-Mohr from Drew University Discusses Volunteer and Internship Programs

Flore Dorcely

Flore Dorcely-Mohr, Internships and Federal Community Service Program assistant director at Drew College shared her experience with Creative Interns around the globe. Take a close look on what Mrs. Dorcely recommends to current students who are trying to find their way into the creative field.

Tell us in your opinion on how internship or volunteer experience can help students during and after their studies?

They help students realize the practical aspects of their career passions by helping them experience some of the pre-professional activities involved in a particular field. It is helpful to network with people who are already working in their area of interest or just to be able to explore other options, if expectations are different than reality. Through this type of experiential learning, students can more vividly see whether their skills, personality or values match their career choices much more effectively than within the walls of a classroom.

What are some most valuable internship employers your college partners with? What makes their program special?

We value all our employer partners, but those in the field of law or medicine are some of the hardest to come by. Typically, these areas hire interns at the graduate level so undergrad opportunities to do research or get involved in substantial projects are less common. We do however have some special opportunities provided by alumni or friends of the center so these are relationships we try to nurture carefully. And also we have a few employers who only advertise exclusively at Drew so we try to earn their loyalty with strategic efforts at recruiting top candidates for those opportunities.

What professional development courses or workshops does your college offer to students?

We have offered and continue to offer a myriad of opportunities to help students in marketing themselves. We have networking events, panel discussions, resume review days, information sessions, etc. We held a social media branding workshop with a leading author/speaker on the topic and often invite guest speakers (often alumni)from across multiple industries to give their perspectives on interviewing and job searching in general.

What piece of advice would you offer a student struggling to obtain interviews?

First, they should come to our office and meet with our counselors to talk about what is happening at the resume application stage and get their resume/coverletter reviewed. If they are not able to get any call backs, I would be concerned that their resume or coverletter may be the issue. Or it could be that they are not applying for the right type of opportunities for their level of experience. Or it could simply be a problem with their email or voicemail! I once had a student who complained to me that they had sent out 50 resumes and did not get a single call back. When I finally got to see her resume, I realized that she did not have her phone number on it! Another student had trouble getting interviews and when I saw her unprofessional email address, I suspected that employers might have been turned off by it.

What kind of skills are in demand by employers these days?

Employers want people who are innovative, critical thinkers, problem solvers, take initiative and show enthusiasm for the field or business. These are more character traits but since they really can’t be taught, I think it very important to convey the right attitude on the job. These are the types of skills/qualities that we emphasize in the liberal arts. I can teach technical skills with a basic competency level employee, but if I don’t like you, it will be tough to keep working with you. The job marketplace is very competitive and if you are not willing to show these types of high demand strengths, someone else will.

What online resources do you recommend for students looking for jobs in creative industry?

Well, we first point them to our own online database, DrewLink and then we have a few online resources depending upon what type of job they are looking for and in what career field. We just acquired an account for a new resource called CareerShift and that is working out pretty well for finding jobs and contacts.

Untitled

Flore Dorcely-Mohr is Assistant Director and joined the Career Center at Drew University in 2006. She manages all aspects of the academic and zero-credit internship programs for undergraduates and serves as the Instructor for those courses. She also directs the campus-wide Federal Community Service (FCSP) Program for students earning work-study funds at local community service agencies. She assists employers from all fields in developing and advertising internship and FCSP opportunities for Drew students. Prior to Drew, she worked as a High School Youth Employment Specialist and for the Career Services department at Bloomfield College. Her background includes working with an Executive Recruiter and Career Coach and teaching career development coursework online. Flore is a Drew Alum with a BA in Sociology and an MA in Counseling with a concentration in Student Affairs-Higher Education from Montclair State University.

May09

Building Experience and Starting Your Career

Rosie Antonecchia

We contacted Career Center Director, Rosie Antonecchia from Palomar College and asked her to share her experience in helping students develop their careers. All the way from California, Rosie replied back with great advice and encouragement for current students. She encourages students to stay humble and invest in their future by earning valuable work experience while still in school. Here are some of the questions we asked Rosie:

In your opinion, how do internships or volunteer experience help students? Internships can provide a glimplse at a career they are strongly considering. Also, students can get valuable experience from volunteer opportunities and walk away with skills they can add to their resume. Maybe most importantly, they meet PEOPLE that have first hand experience and can give feedback to the intern about what they can bring to the table as a potential employee.

How do you help students to prepare resumes, portfolios, social media, and interviewing skills?  We offer job readiness workshops: resume and cover letter building, job search strategies, and mock interviews with career counselors.

What piece of advice would you offer a student struggling to obtain interviews? Practice, practice, practice with a live audience and be open to feedback. Making small adjustments during mock interviews can hep your correct the wrong behavior before the real interview.

What kind of skills are in demand by employers these days? Creativity and innovation, up to date technology skills, effective listening, verbal and written communications skills, strong interpersonal skills, critical thinking skills, a strong work ethic, having a “can do” attitude, self-starters and strong team players.

What do you recommend for students looking for jobs in the creative industry? Instructors in the creative departments are a great resource of information for students in these programs. CreativeInterns.com seems like a valuable resource for entry-level talent and hiring employers.

Palomar College

Rosie Antonecchia’s 20+ years of counseling experience includes: group counseling, individual counseling, outreach activities, workshop facilitation, teaching classes, newsletter writing, marketing material production, that range from mental health facilities, high school settings, social work agencies, career centers and community colleges.  Rosie is currently a Career Center Director at Palomar College in San Marcos, California. 

Written by Ana Komnenovic

Apr20

How To Ace Your Interview

Many students and recent graduates blow their interviews because they do not follow some of the most basic recommendations in preparing and closing the interview process. CreativeInterns.com has compiled some of the biggest faux pas into a 60 second motion graphics video to give you an edge over your competition.

Watch it, learn it, live it – Ace Your Interview!

Mar06

Interview of Diane Ly | Copywriter Intern

Diane Ly

 

Interviewee Name: Diane Ly

Intern Position Title: Copywriter Intern

Company Name: RAPP New York

Company URL: www.rappusa.com

Creative Interns: Tell us the steps you took to land an internship or entry-level position?

Diane Ly: Moving to New York from California with no job lined up was absolutely daunting, but I knew there were resources out there to help me find a position. The problem was, I wasn’t sure which one to use as an entry-level recent graduate with a creative background. CreativeInterns.com showed up in my Google search (I’m actually not even sure what I searched), I applied for a PR/Marketing Assistant position (at Creative Interns!) and the rest was history. I worked closely w/ CEO and founder Marc Scoleri who became a close friend and wonderful mentor. Through Creative Interns, I was able to attend networking events I never would have found if I were not part of the community. I improved my writing portfolio through blogging, and landed a copywriting internship at RAPP New York.

Creative Interns: How did you find CreativeInterns.com?

Diane Ly: As part of my job search. The only source I can recall is Google!

Creative Interns: What keeps you caffeinated Coffee or tea?

Diane Ly: COFFEE. And lots of it.

Creative Interns: What made your internship experience unique?

Diane Ly: Since RAPP is my first advertising agency experience (I have a journalism background), I had no idea what to expect. Soon enough, I was thrown into briefings, creative brainstormings, and asked to write whatever the client needed. It was scary at first, but now that I’ve gotten the hang of it I know that I never would have been able to learn the skills I did in such a short period of time if I hadn’t been fully immersed in the advertising world as I was. It was a huge growth and learning experience.

Creative Interns: What skills did you learn or improve while at your internship?

Diane Ly: Teamwork. Coordinating with my art director partner and making sure we weren’t forgetting anything for our meeting. Communication is key – you can’t leave any questions unanswered.

Creative Interns: Can you describe what a normal day is for an intern at your company?

Diane Ly: Normally, I will be working on 1-3 projects at a time. Coming off a brief, I’ll research, write, and go over my work with a senior to make sure I’m hitting all the marks the client wants us to. I’ll work with the art director on the project, and together we’ll make MAGIC! A few rounds of internal reviews and then it’ll be looked over by the client, after which more edits will take place.

Creative Interns: Give us one word to describe your workplace environment?

Diane Ly: DIVERSE.

Creative Interns: What advice would you give to someone just starting to look for an internship or entry-level job?

Diane Ly: Do not give up and do not have an ego. Remember: you are one of SO many people looking for an entry-level position. So, don’t expect to hear back from every single job you apply to, and when you DO hear back, always, always, always take the opportunity to interview and grow, even if the position isn’t exactly what you’re looking for. It helps build interviewing skills and manage your nerves.

Creative Interns: What do you do to fill the inspiration gas tank?

Diane Ly: Go outside. Don’t coop yourself up in front of the computer screen all day. Taking a walk and seeing different things each day will inspire you to be adventurous.

Creative Interns: What’s next for you?

Diane Ly: Build my copywriting portfolio, learn from every project I have, and give advice to those who seek it. Good luck!