Category Archives: Talent Interviews

Articles related to being an intern.

Aug02

3 Tips for Interviewing the Interviewer

Interviewing the interviewer

If interviewing is a new skill for you then pay close attention to these three tips for interviewing the interviewer.

Research the company and the people who will be interviewing you

This is easier than ever to do these days with professional networks such as Linkedin and other social media pages like Instagram, Facebook or Youtube. Look for similar interests, previous places of employment to see if they may know people that are connected to you and associations or organizations the interviewer has affiliation with. In addition, consider who they follow on Linkedin to understand where they like to get their news from. These are great facts to use to generate engaging questions. Conversations related to past careers and topics from channels they follow on Youtube can be used to develop instant rapport.

Be prepared to answer questions about your skills and achievements

To prepare, look at your resume and and identify bullet points that are measurable accomplishments. They should look something like this, “Consistently overachieved delivery goal of 10 new postcard designs a week.” Now all you have to do is use your resume during the interview to point out the achievement on the resume and discuss how you actually overachieved that goal on a regular basis. If you have several of these achievements on your resume (which you should) then you will always be able to answer any question that sounds vaguely familiar to, “Why should we hire you?” or “What experience do you have?”

Show interest in the position by inquiring about next steps

Don’t leave the interview without finding out how you can follow up. You may have additional questions in the future as you continue interviewing. Ask the interviewer if they have a timeline for hiring? Is it one month, 2 weeks or did they just start interviewing and they still have 10 candidates to meet? This will show that you are interested in following up so ask for their business card or email/phone to do so. If you are truly interested in the position, let them know that the position sounds great and you look forward to taking any next steps they recommend.

May29

You Too Can Find Your Dream Job, Here’s How?

do_what_you_love

If your current job does not satisfy you or you think it is time for a change in careers, you are most likely leaning in direction of following your dreams of working in the industry of your dreams. It is unlikely that you will jump from one bad job to another so if you are seriously thinking of leaving your current job for a new one, we suggest you apply for your dream job. You do not want to waste your time in yet another job that does not satisfy you.  Life is way too short.

If you are seriously considering this, you need to do the following things to land the job of your dreams:

1.    Get a Clear Idea of What Your Ideal Job Is

Can you sum up in two to three sentences of what your ideal job is? If you cannot, we have some major work to do here. You need to be able to define the exact requirements you are looking for in a job that you absolutely want.

Base your requirements on your interests and hobbies, and then come up with a job description that matches them. We repeat never ever take or leave a job based on other people’s view on it. For instance, you love to paint and want to make a career out of it, knowing that not many succeed. Just go ahead and do it.

2.    Learn to Sacrifice and Compromise

In the beginning of any job, you will struggle, but it is on how you handle the struggle that defines your success in the future. To deal with the setbacks, you will have to compromise on certain things. You might have to sacrifice going out to eat with friends, your car, and other things. However, the sacrifices and compromises that you make all depend on the type of job you have selected for yourself.

3.    Learn to Sell Your Skills

If you are a website designer, you will need to find customers who need their websites revamped. How will you find them? By calling them and selling your services, you might land a few clients. Remember, companies may not want to hire an unknown person cold calling them. In the beginning stages of your dream job, you can sell your services at no cost to them. Perhaps, they might even end up hiring you.

4.    Never Give Up

You might not find your dream job as soon as start looking for one. You may land interviews, but may not secure the jobs, but the key here is never to give up. You need to keep searching for your dream job regardless if takes you a six months or a whole year. Since it can take you a while, remain at your old job or take up freelancing jobs in your field to showcase your talents.

Whether you are looking for your next dream job, or you are a Recruiter or Employer seeking a new employee the Social Media, Digital, Web, Creative and IT Global Jobs Board can help you.

For Job Seekers:  Instant application and access to thousands of Live Jobs covering an extensive range of sectors and worldwide locations from some of the world’s leading companies and recruiters.  Start by setting up a Job Mail Alert.

Apr06

Student Excuses for being late

Train

Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to work with students in the capacity of a School Director, Director of Career Services and CEO of CreativeInterns.com. These positions often required students to either arrive on time for an appointment, interview or class and therefore enabled me to hear numerous reasons why students were late or just didn’t show up.

Over the past couple years, I started taking note of some of the more unique and often used excuses, truths and sometimes absurd flat-out lies that were told to me. I’ll leave it up to you to decide if these excuses were given in truth or to create empathy, shock or exemption from discipline for being late or not showing up. Enjoy!

Excuse #1

A homeless guy punched me because I was wearing a red hat.

Excuse #2

There was a really long line at the coffee shop.

Excuse #3

My shoe untied and I fell up the steps.

Excuse #4

There was fog and the ferry was delayed.

Excuse #5

My best friend was sick. (Note: can replace “best friend” with any living thing)

Excuse #6

I got my period.

Excuse #7

My train was delayed.

Excuse #8

I got lost.

Excuse #9

My alarm didn’t go off.

Excuse #10

I don’t know why I am late.

 

Written by: Marc Scoleri

Mar03

Company Spotlight: Bulldog Digital Media

Bulldog Digital Media

Bulldog Digital Media’s Gareth Bull, is passionate about Search Engine Optimization (SEO). As the Director of Bulldog Digital Media this search marketer is based just outside of London in Essex. With nearly three years within this fast paced industry, Gareth and his company help businesses of all sizes achieve ROI on their digital campaigns.

Bulldog Digital Media is a specialized SEO & Social Marketing company. They focus on supplying simple ROI campaigns to small to large sized companies. Sound like a place you’d like to work? For junior positions, the agency usually gets approached by local students. Gareth always looks at the CV design and copy when considering new talent for the company. In addition, checking references of any candidate can help determine if the skills listed on the resume are at the level required for the project at hand.

According to Gareth, the skills that are most important for an employee at Bulldog Digital Media include a willingness to learn and an understanding of Social and SEO. Gareth says, “A typical day is varied — from huge website migrations, to setting up a local business in Google to rank locally for their commercial search terms.”

Gareth Bull

Gareth Bull

Career Advice From Gareth Bull

What tips can you offer a recent graduate that is preparing to interview for an entry-level position? 

  • Research the company and the individuals in huge detail.

What piece of advice would you offer a student struggling to obtain interviews?

  • Craft your CV into a thing of beauty.

What skills are in high demand by your company these days?

  • Fast learning individuals.

 

Contributor: Marc Scoleri
Feb27

Career Tips from Superdry

Superdry

For any young person coming out of school or college finding the first job can be a daunting prospect. This may especially be the case if the dream is starting a career in fashion as the industry is notorious for its competitive nature, largely due to its popularity. Taking the first steps to attaining a position in the industry might seem like a mountain to climb.

Despite the reputation of job hunting in the fashion industry nothing is unattainable when the right boxes are ticked and effort is made. As with most job aspiration reaching the goal can be simplified by breaking down your targets that can help to visualise the steps that you need to take.

  • Experience and Portfolio – the difference between being successful in an interview and not making the cut can be as simple as the amount of experience that you have behind you. Taking opportunities to get into the working environment and challenge yourself will build your knowledge of what work you can thrive with and is right for you.

 

  • CV and Interview Follow-ups – Stand out from the crowd when sending your CV to a company or after interviews. Turning away an application is a lot easier when there hasn’t been a conversation between you and the employer

 

  • Look at your talents and use them – There are plenty of areas in the fashion industry which require a range of skills, don’t think that you have to be an expert fashion designer to be in the industry. Roles in marketing, writing, and finance all have a place in fashion; find your strength and follow it.

 

  • Manage your online presence – social media is an invaluable tool for keeping up to date with current trends in the industry as well as developments in the companies you’re aspiring to. Follow the people that are in the know with the key information that could help to give you the killer edge on others.

See additional guidelines for what’s looked for in the fashion industry with a full list of job roles in this article from Fashion-Schools.org.

Superdry are one of the most prominent international fashion brands to spring from the UK over the last two decades. Started in 2003 by founders Julian Dunkerton and James Holder, the brand distinguishes itself fusing American and Japanese-inspired graphics with British style. Celebrit­ies such as David Beckham, Bradley Cooper and Justin Bieber have worn and endorsed the brand.

Brand Director

Julian Dunkerton first entered the fashion industry in 1985 at the age of 19 through a government grant scheme. He now takes the role of product and brand director, focussing on the  creative force behind Superdry.

Is there any advice you would give to people, in their early twenties, looking to start a business?

You have to forget about objects and just try to be the best that you can possibly be in the niche that you think you have found. There are thousands of niches, it’s just a case of finding yours. Never think of yourself. It’s about your staff, your customer, and your business. You’re tenth on the list. If you are thinking that you are doing it for material things, then forget it, because you’ll never make the right decisions in business to build the business.

Is your specific route that you have taken something that you would advise others to follow? A lot of aspirational young people are beginning to consider university to be the default option.

I think it’s very typical for people like me to have not been to university. If you look at the serious entrepreneurs in this country you will find that a huge number of them have not been to university and out of the entrepreneurs that have been to university they become entrepreneurs because often of their particular skills base, so they go down a very narrow channel.

James Holder co-founded Superdry with Julian, sharing his drive and continued ambition for fashion. Also starting his career early Holder shares his journey into the fashion industry:

Superdry

What made you decide to get into the world of fashion?

I fell into fashion by accident! When I was at college, I was crazily being an expert in skateboarding, and somehow I saw that nobody is making that king of cool t-shirts for these skaters, so I started doing them by myself and selling them to others. From that, I saw that I can make a living out of it. So it was not what I love for fashion, it was what I loved for creativity. Even for this day, I don’t count myself as a fashion designer, but as a product designer.

What has been the best part about creating the brand?

We are obsessed with products, and also with creativity and with what we do. When things got tough, we see that it’s time to give more creative and expansion. You’ve got a different source of emotional attachment to each product you make, but you’re in love with them.  So whether it could be the smallest little accessory or the most incredible artisan of the jacket, you will have the same emotional attachment, so it is a joy to do this.  We’re a premium branded brand, but we think far for fashion and we have a completely dynamic clothes collection that changes on a weekly basis.

There are many avenues to take to get into the industry that you want to be involved with. Opportunities might not present themselves as being a direct step into the fashion world yet with building your experiences your path should follow where your strengths lie. And remember that with whatever role you decide to pursue it should be something that you love and enjoy doing above all else!

Contributor, Mathew Foster

Sep08

Career Spotlight: Devin Romeo

photo

Devin Romeo is a young graphic designer who works for a sports social media website called Sports 195. He has recently started working on web design for this site and we talked to him about the experience of working an entry level design job.

Creative Interns: What are your responsibilities as an entry-level designer?

Devin Romeo: I am responsible for designing parts of the website, which can include anything from what a news module looks like, to a UI element, to an intro page. It can be anything that involves that website. And a part of me does print designs for a co-brand we have. I also design brochures and pamphlets, so I kind of do everything.

CI: How did you come to work at Sports 195?

DR: I actually looked it up on Monster. At the time I was primarily a print designer but I had just finished an internship in web design and ended up liking it. I looked up this job and it said that they were looking for a graphic designer with a preference in web design. It was entry-level which turned out to be a good transition to learn how to do web design, and how to be involved with a web-based company. It allowed a lot of room for growth and it went as far into web design that I personally wanted to go.

CI: What advice do you have for recent graduates trying to get a graphic design job?

DR: In the creative world you have to not just stand out, but stand out in a good way. Don’t go over the top, but you have to be noticeable and memorable, and everything has to be clean. Make sure your work represents who you are. Apply to as many places as possible and make sure the first things these businesses see is the best that you have. Make a great personal website. People want to see visuals. I had a resume and I had attachments but my actual website was very primitive, so I ended up having to do a lot of persuading. When I finally got my job I was at the other end of the spectrum looking at applicants. The first thing my creative director would look at was the applicant’s website. If a website didn’t look good, or it had bugs, or you could tell they had used a template he almost just threw it away immediately.

CI: What is the most unexpected thing about working in web design?

DR: It was probably the turnaround on projects. You would spend weeks putting in work to build a page and it looks incredible and you’re so happy with what you’ve done and you finally send it out, only to not hear back about it for weeks. The reason is that it might look nice and it might fit all the criteria but you have to worry about developers. They have to look at previous coding, create new style sheets and override old style sheets, and there’s so much more. I still don’t know half of what happens on the back end, but there’s so much time involved outside of designing the page to make a website work.

CI: What prepared you the most for a graphic design position?

DR: I think that as much as college helped prepared me for my career, my first internship absolutely prepared me the most. When you have an internship you aren’t worried about a grade, you’re worried about a client, who is worth a lot to that company, so you’re on the line for a number of reasons.

CI: Take me through a typical day at work for you.

DR: When I get in I will usually be working on something that’s left over from the day before. That could be a page we’re working on or a specific element of a page. If I don’t have anything to do, which is rare, I speak directly to my Art Director and he will give me work. Everything goes through him. Usually I’m given 2-3 projects a day. On the rare occasion I’ll be given one huge project or a number of miniature projects. I’ll work on them for the entire day and take lunch whenever I want to, and leave sometime after 5:30. My schedule is very flexible. It’s a laid back environment but it’s still very demanding.

CI: What influenced your career choice the most?

DR: My grandfather. He was a pioneer in the creative industry. During his prime he designed logos for brands, scoreboards at major stadiums, and so much more. It is just inspiring that someone I know has done all that. I want to follow in his footsteps and, more or less, change the way the world is looked at. Which is essentially what graphic design is. That’s what he did and that is what I want to do.

May05

Landing The Job: Marie Alcober

1098038_10153178729605160_2066378516_nOnce you land your dream internship, where do you go from there? Many students take on internships with the hopes of coming out with a job. Although it’s never a guarantee, there’s always opportunity to put yourself out there and get noticed. Recent Ryerson University journalism graduate Marie Alcober shares insight into how she went from an intern to a web producer at the Business News Network (BNN).

Tell us a bit about yourself:

I’m a curious, fly-by-the-seat-off-my-pants kind of girl. I don’t shy away from new things and I’m not afraid to admit that I know very little. That’s what’s so great about the journalism industry. I get the opportunity to meet smart people and learn from their expertise everyday.

How did you first land your internship with BNN?

To be able to graduate, I had to complete an internship program during my fourth year at Ryerson University. The only goal I set for myself, really, was to do an internship that would really put me out of my comfort zone. I figured that this was my last chance to try something different before going into the “real world.” Initially, I had planned to do reporting in the Philippines, where I thought I could test my resilience. But when that didn’t pan out, I thought of the second hardest type of journalism that I thought I could never do: business. So I emailed my internship coordinator and she gave me a contact at BNN. I emailed the network’s executive producer and got an interview in two weeks.

What attracted you to this company?

The fact that it’s the only TV channel in Canada that focuses only on business and finance news. It’s a great place to have an immersive learning experience because you don’t get pulled into different areas of news.

What skills did you learn during your internship?

I learned to actually read reports—cover to cover. Journalism school teaches students to listen for “juicy quotes” but a lot of reporting is simply poring over documents. Surprisingly, in most cases the more interesting points are only glossed over in page one. You’ve got to dig deep.

How long did you intern with BNN?

Six weeks.

What was the most valuable thing you took from your internship experience?

When you throw yourself into a situation knowing that everything about it will be new and unfamiliar, it sort of gives you a sense of self like never before. That’s probably the most valuable thing I took from this—a self-assurance that I can dip my toes into all sorts of new and unfamiliar endeavors and not be afraid of them.

How did you turn your internship into a job?

The truth of it is, I simply asked. I let my supervisor know that I would make myself available for them if they ever need any help. I asked if I could stay on as an intern, so I could get the hang of everything, in case they needed someone to fill in during the holidays.

What role do you have within the company now?

I’m part of BNN.ca‘s web team. I edit and post videos and wire stories to the website. I also write mini-articles that go along with interview segments. Basically, I help make sure that the television segments are translated into web content that’s hopefully valuable to both the core BNN viewers and the wider online audience as well.

What advice do you have for other interns?

Don’t pretend like you know it all. The veterans will see right through you. And besides, it’s easier for you to absorb your surroundings when you let yourself become a blank slate.

Apr24

Intern Spotlight: Kailey Sibley

pName: Kailey Sibley

Intern Position Title: Social Media for CBC Olympics and Hockey Night in Canada

Company: CBC Sports

Location: Toronto

Tell us a little bit about yourself:

I’m a tiny sports fanatic living in downtown Toronto. I’ve recently finished the Radio & Television Arts program at Ryerson University, and am working my way into the world of sports broadcasting. I can tell you anything you need to know about the Stanley Cup, loose-leaf tea, and Orca Whales. I’m a huge fan of a good goal celebration, 4th-liner jerseys, and a solid playoff beard.

Can you tell us the steps you took to land this internship?

I actually applied to do a shot-listing internship for Hockey Night in Canada. I had to send in my resume and cover letter around four times before I was contacted for an interview. The interview was terrible. I was told I would never get to actually watch any sports during the internship because I’d be too busy getting coffee for people and running up and down the stairs. I asked if they had any writing and social media internships available. I was told no. A month later they asked me if I would do a writing and social media internship for the Olympics. I said yes, obviously.

What attracted you to this company?

CBC Sports is the pinnacle of sports broadcasting in Canada. I grew up watching Don Cherry and Ron MacLean on Hockey Night in Canada every Saturday night. The opportunity to be a part of the CBC Sports team during the Winter Olympics was too good to pass up.

What skills did you learn at your internship?

I now speak in 140-character bursts.

Could you describe what a typical day was like for you as an intern?

The Olympics were a crazy time on the CBC Sports floor. We had an awesome social media team working 24 hours a day, every day from Day -1 of the Olympics, to Day 16. As soon as I arrived for my 8 a.m. start, I was updating Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, and YouTube constantly. Covering hockey was my main focus. I would sit and watch every single game, live-tweeting them from one account on my phone and another on my laptop. I feel like I didn’t look up from my screen until the night shift arrived to take over social media duties!

What was the most challenging part?

The first time I tweeted a mistake. Everyone always says, “It’s okay to make mistakes.” When you’re representing a major corporation on social media, it isn’t okay to make mistakes. Always quadruple-check your work!

Most memorable moment?

Live-tweeting the men’s gold medal hockey game on the CBC Olympics and Hockey Night in Canada accounts. I literally skipped into work at 5 a.m. that morning. It was like Christmas for me. This is closely followed by the time I got to have a slice of Don Cherry’s birthday cake.

Give us one word to describe your workplace environment:

Exciting–there’s always something happening there.

What advice do you have for someone who is just starting to look for an internship?

Be persistent. Know everyone, and make sure everyone knows you. Never be that person everyone sees around but no one actually knows who you are. Offer to work on your days off. Dress for the job you want, not the one you have. Even if everyone else is in jeans, if your boss dresses up, you should too. Try not to yawn in front of your employers. Be enthusiastic about everything. Never apologize for doing your job. Triple-check your work…then check it again.

Who do you look up to in the industry?

My boss, Monika Platek. She does everything from writing, to social media, to on-air work. I swear she never sleeps.

What is your dream job?

Anything that involves talking about sports into a microphone.

Mar24

Career Spotlight: Katie Robinson

Katie RobinsonKatie Robinson is a young creative talent who functions as the Administrative Assistant to the Vice President of Production Management at Sesame Street, assisting with the production needs of Street Story, Crumby Pictures Presents, Super Grover and Elmo the Musical segments. In her spare time, she runs Ask the Young Professional, a site for the “savvy twentysomething.” We caught up with Katie to talk about her career in, and passion for, production management.
Creative Interns: What specifically motivated you to go this direction in your career?
 
Katie Robinson: I had a really great communications program at Fitchburg State University where I was able to experience a variety of film/video positions hands on. It was through this trial and error period that I was able to narrow down my strengths, weaknesses, what I liked and what I didn’t like. I discovered that my passion really lied within Production Management. I could see myself working towards being a Producer, Assistant Director or Stage Manager based off the experience I had and the skill-sets I knew these positions required. I was really lucky that I knew this about myself early on because it gave me the drive to pursue these areas while still in school. This also lead me to my internship with Sesame Workshop which is where I got my first job. The rest has been a combination of seizing opportunities and working off the adrenalin of doing something I love.
 
CI: Sesame Workshop promotes educational learning through television and media. As an assistant in production management, what is your day-to-day like in promoting the mission of the Sesame Workshop?
 
KR: My main focus in my position is to make sure everyone is able to carry out their duties fully. The day to day specifics vary, but the range can be from simple set ups and scheduling meetings, to helping with keeping track of financial records, to assisting with the planning and production of larger events. I look at my job as a connector piece that helps all the big pieces work together. Without my position, details would get left behind or precocious time would be taken away from the big picture projects.
 
CI: For film and production management news and advice, what are your go-to resources?
 
KR: Honestly, my first go to is people. I learn so much more by talking to people. There is something to be said about the personal connection and information people can give you. Then, there are always great sites like Variety and The Hollywood Report that give you pretty much everything you need to know about what is happening currently. I have their apps on my iPhone and follow them on Twitter to stay up to date as well.
 
CI: What tips can you provide a college student, recent graduate or entry-level talent looking to embark on your career path? 
 
There are two things you should always be doing: talking to people and gathering experience. Networking is really how you will get your jobs, especially since it’s such a freelance-heavy field. Even if you’re not working you can be gaining experience by creating on your own. Whether you’re writing, producing, directing, or filming the creative work you do will keep your momentum going, keep your skills fresh and give you more work examples to share.
 
KR: What is your dream job?
 
This is always a tough question because even though “Producer, Assistant Director or Stage Manager” is always my default answer, I’m also very open to seeing where my career path takes me. I’ve heard from so many people who have been working in the industry for at least twenty years now how they never thought they’d get to where they are now through the path they took. One job lead to the next and then eventually they ended up in a position they really loved and are doing really well for themselves. I think a real dream job for me would be one where I can work to bring collaborative creative minds together to make one final piece and be involved in the pre-production and production process.
To further connect with Katie, tweet with her on Twitter, connect with her on LinkedIn or follow her on Instagram.
Feb17

Seven Degrees of Stacy Hanas: Social Media Intern Spotlight

StacyHanas

Social Media Week 2014 is upon us. “The Future of Now” theme focuses on the paradigm shift of communications, how we currently interact with technology and the impact of this “always on, always connected” world. We wanted to kick off our efforts for social media week by highlighting Stacy Hanas, a stellar social media intern at Seven Degrees Communications.

Creative Interns: What are the steps you took to secure your internship at Seven Degrees Communications?

Stacy Hanas: My journey to Seven Degrees Communications came as a result of a sequence of unique opportunities. As Vice President of Stockton’s Public Relations Student Society (PRSSA), I discovered the importance of professionalism – a skill that transcended to the social media community. My opportunity with John Wiley & Sons as a Public Relations and Branding intern shaped my writing skills. Each stage taught me an exceptional skill set that President and Chief Connector, Jessica Levin, found to be of strength to her company.

CI: Tell us about your experience at Seven Degrees Communications. What is a normal day or week life for a social media intern/coordinator?

SH: Seven Degrees Communications’ ultimate mission is to help clients build relationships in both online and offline communities. My main responsibility is to enhance the company’s online presence as well as the amount of leads for each client. With that said, my day consists of utilizing strategy in preparation, planning and posting for clients’ social media outlets.

The preparation process includes analytical skills to disclose information pertaining to viewership. Planning includes multiple steps in order to secure an influx of followers and leads for clients. For example, I often search Forbes, The UnderCover Recruiter, and The Society of Human Resources for our human resources client. To achieve leads, I search through streams like #SHRM, #HR, #nextchat, #HRCI and #Tchat. From the aforementioned websites, I post intriguing content, and with these streams, I engage and retweet industry professionals.

The posting process includes discovering the most frequent times viewers engage in posts and scheduling posts around those times via Hootsuite. Analytics also shows which posts receives the most engagement so I know what type of content to post and how to concentrate on the wording of the post.

CI: What specifically motivated you to go this direction in your career?

SH: My interest for the field of public relations was piqued while working in my former position as Promotions Director at Blue Colt Radio. The opportunity allowed me to fine tune skills in exceptional patience, detail, and marketing. However, it wasn’t until Jessica Levin trained me in Hootsuite social media-marketing platform that I was able to unlock my true enthusiasm for the marketing sphere. While to most it might seem like light-hearted fun to tweet for a living, to me it is much more. It takes analytic skills to determine the best time to release tweets for optimal viewership, strategic skills to expand small amounts to stronger players in the field, and critical thinking skills to find the most relevant articles for my audience.

Social media strategy is a great marketing tactic that positively enhances a company’s online presence and their amount of leads. Ultimately, I find myself developing creative tweets and following industry professionals in my spare time for fun.

CI: What blogs, websites and feeds do you read to stay up to date on new digital and social trends?

SH: I find mobile applications and Twitter to be my most prominent form of news. My most frequently viewed mobile applications include Newsify, Flipboard, CNN and ABC News. Whereas Forbes and New York Times have been my two most commonly viewed Twitter accounts for news related issues. Newsify is an application designed to inform users on current news from their preferred media outlets. I stay informed on industry and social trends by following Inside Facebook, Hootsuite and CNN.com on Newsify. 

CI: Social Media Week is finally here. What do you hope to learn from this year’s “The Future of Now” theme in order to accelerate your career?

SH: “The Future of Now” strongly represents our society today. Innovations such as Google Glass, the Fitbit and other examples of wearable technology allow consumers to remain persistently connected to data. As an attendee at Social Media Week 2014, I hope to walk away with greater understanding of Big Data and how it impacts a marketer’s decision. I also hope to gain a better understanding of how to utilize big data to develop a stronger social media strategy.

Furthermore, I am hoping to attend The Art & Science of Storytelling presented by the New York Times. This session description states, “brands are publishers and publishers are platforms,” which indicates the importance of publishing creative content to attract consumers. I am interested to discover consumer’s interests and how I can develop ingenious content that would apply to consumers of today.

To stay up-to-date with all that Stacy Hanas is doing, follow her on Twitter!

To stay up-to-date with our live event coverage and post even recaps for Social Media Week, follow us on Twitter and like us Facebook!