Category Archives: Internship

Sep07

Advice for Internships By Samantha Lauro

Samantha Lauro

You Were Chosen For a Reason:

Every person has the quintessential, “I don’t know what I am doing” feeling when they start a new job. It is only natural, as you’re in a completely new environment consisting of client approval rather than grade percentiles. There will definitely be moments that challenge you and even make you question your chosen career path. Your most important asset is how the anxiety is managed, as what ultimately defines the situation is the end result. Therefore look at the long run rather than getting caught up in the moment.

Morning Routine:

I suggest treating yourself to a coffee, or general beverage/snack, at least once a week to keep your mornings interesting. This especially goes for those who commute; not only does it expose you to new locations around the city, but it also takes the mindlessness out of the daily routine. I am a self-proclaimed, or self-diagnosed, caffeine addict so to me this is essential.

What to Wear: 

Attire is important. It is the first impression people have of you and sets the tone. The rule of thumb is usually, dress a level beyond the position you are aiming for. I concur, but my personal thought is that one must gage the social climate and dress appropriately. In other words, integrate yourself with the office culture but maintain a professional appearance. If your place of work is on the casual side, I recommend mixing professional and dressed down pieces to keep the balance.

Going to a Work Event:

This is a great opportunity to get to know co-workers. Be social and make connections. It may be intimidating but I have found most people to be open and friendly, plus casual conversation is a great way to gain insight on the field you are embarking in. Be yourself and be genuine; at the end of the day a real relationship is far more important than a list of completed office tasks or superficial conversation. Enjoy yourself!

Stay Off Your Phone:

To become fully involved and connected with jobs and accounts one should avoid distractions. Put the phone down and get the full experience. Use 100% of your mental capacity and it will pay off with regard to work quality and work relationships.

Junior Associate Mentality:

Think of yourself as a junior associate rather than an intern. People will tell you not to sweat it because “you are only an intern” but I say rise to the occasion. Don’t give yourself a proverbial out. You are working at a real company and the work you do will have an impact in some way, especially if you elevate your thinking.

Meetings:

Pay attention to details and take notes. Observe and absorb the general information and the essence of the gathering. Note the interaction, strategy, attitude, posture, and language. There are so many external and intrinsic lessons to learn, as meetings show thought process, culture, and final result. Always have an opinion about what is being said, and try to contribute when appropriate. You never know when you will be asked about your thoughts, therefore, listening intently is key. Additionally, ask questions to show that you are attentive and interested in learning. If you are nervous ask questions after the meeting or through a follow up email.

When in Doubt, Go for It:

There will be quite a few times during an internship where the opportunity to go beyond what is expected presents itself. Many times it means putting oneself on the line or taking a chance. Admittedly, this is pretty scary especially in a new place. Personal examples of this included emailing my thoughts on an account after sitting in on a meeting, creating a POV, presenting an idea to an art director, and asserting my opinion despite the fact that it challenged the idea of another co-worker. Before every decision I contemplated whether or not I should act, and I went for it. I can say with confidence that it was worth it, as each became a personal victory despite varying degrees of success. Take a chance on yourself, it will pay off and show initiative.

Don’t be Afraid to Stay Late:

Staying late can be daunting. If there comes a time where you need to stay late to get something done embrace it; buckle down and get to work. You want to show your team that you are dependable and dedicated, therefore don’t run out of the office at 5:00pm on the dot. In the process of staying late you may even meet some coworkers who you would not have met during the day. Additionally, if you are working on a project for someone, always check with them before you head out for the day.

Commuting:

Commuting is exhausting and can be mind-numbing. A good percentage of the time I was passed out on LIRR, but for the days when my mind was left wandering I often searched for a way to pass the time. I suggest making a playlists to keep it fun; good music makes every situation better. I also recommend podcasts, as they are a great way to wake up your mind for the workday.

Time Management:

One will quickly realize that time is fleeting, especially if there is an abundance of work to be done. Stay on top of your work and things will run smoothly. Additionally, quality is essential so do not rush through your tasks at hand. It can be hard to say no to projects when multiple people come to you for help at the same time. If you think you can handle more work then go for it, but do not take on more responsibility if quality of work will suffer. It helps to know deadlines and be open; ask your supervisors when things are due and create an open dialogue. Lastly, keep a schedule to keep track of jobs.

Carry a Notebook:

I am a firm believer in carrying a notebook at all times during an internship. You can record what is going on, keep track of work and information, and have a daily account of your internship experience. It is also great for writing down ideas when inspiration strikes.

Work Quality:

Quality on one task can determine whether people will come to you for other jobs. Put in maximum effort. Also, do not be afraid to ask questions, as an internship should be about developing your skills.

Be Hungry:

An internship is a learning experience. Strive to learn as much as possible, and experience all that you can. Ask to attend meetings, look for work, volunteer, and enquire about opinions. Be assertive, in a mature way, and you shall receive.

Think Outside of the Box:

Creative thinking is valuable. As an outsider you do not have preconceived notions/stigmas from the industry and are not assimilated to the general way of thinking. Moreover, you hold a fresh perspective and come from a place of different experiences. Use this to your benefit and go against the grain. Also, some of the most wacky and outrageous ideas can be the best, or at the very least can stimulate thought, so make sure to speak up.

End of Internship:

Meet with your supervisor one last time before you leave to debrief. It can be a great way to gain valuable feedback on your performance and can showcase your progress. Be sure to thank your supervisor, as graciousness goes a long way.

 

Jun15

Triple your job chances with this simple thing

Resume Shoppe logo

Studies show that you have on average 6 seconds to grab the attention of someone reading your resume. 6 Seconds, that’s not a lot of time, right? You better make that great first impression then!
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Caleb Resume

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Debbie Resume

Jun10

How companies review your resume

resume image

If you have done up your resume on resume bond, maybe with some carefully chosen fonts – then you are almost sure to be rejected as a candidate for a job. First impressions count, and companies aren’t looking for superficial impressions but an idea of how qualified you are to fill the position. What surprises many people is finding out how many companies use software to filter the first round of resumes.

Automated resume filters

Most larger companies are using automated resume filter software, and many smaller companies now hire recruitment agencies to use filter software to make the number of applications they review manageable. These filters take a scanned image of your resume, and then score it according to key words and phrases the company sets that describe the qualifications and skills needed for the job.

The importance of using a template

Resume templates are very important when applying for a job today. Make sure everything on your resume is presented in a logical order so that reviewers are able to skim it. Using a resume template keeps your information in order, and easy to read. A great tip if you want your template to stand out from other applicants is to have a look at ResumeShoppe. This site has a selection of cv templates for Word that will surely get you noticed and help you structure your information.

Keywords and key phrases

To beat the filter you have to know the key words and phrases used in your industry to describe the job that is listed. You may excel in being level headed and organized, but if the standard way of describing that in the position is “flow based management” and “conflict resolution,” you need to use their words and not your own. Make sure you do your homework so you know the right words to help you get through the filter to land the interview.

Making sure you understand your industry

Before you race off and grab a resume template that you like the looks of, take the time to do a little investigation into what your industry is looking for in a candidate. There is a pattern to how they want to see information. Some industries want to see your skills first, while others will be more interested in your related experience. Just about all of the companies are going to want to know more about you – but whether it is through an objective/goal statement or an executive summary is going to depend on the position as well.

May29

You Too Can Find Your Dream Job, Here’s How?

do_what_you_love

If your current job does not satisfy you or you think it is time for a change in careers, you are most likely leaning in direction of following your dreams of working in the industry of your dreams. It is unlikely that you will jump from one bad job to another so if you are seriously thinking of leaving your current job for a new one, we suggest you apply for your dream job. You do not want to waste your time in yet another job that does not satisfy you.  Life is way too short.

If you are seriously considering this, you need to do the following things to land the job of your dreams:

1.    Get a Clear Idea of What Your Ideal Job Is

Can you sum up in two to three sentences of what your ideal job is? If you cannot, we have some major work to do here. You need to be able to define the exact requirements you are looking for in a job that you absolutely want.

Base your requirements on your interests and hobbies, and then come up with a job description that matches them. We repeat never ever take or leave a job based on other people’s view on it. For instance, you love to paint and want to make a career out of it, knowing that not many succeed. Just go ahead and do it.

2.    Learn to Sacrifice and Compromise

In the beginning of any job, you will struggle, but it is on how you handle the struggle that defines your success in the future. To deal with the setbacks, you will have to compromise on certain things. You might have to sacrifice going out to eat with friends, your car, and other things. However, the sacrifices and compromises that you make all depend on the type of job you have selected for yourself.

3.    Learn to Sell Your Skills

If you are a website designer, you will need to find customers who need their websites revamped. How will you find them? By calling them and selling your services, you might land a few clients. Remember, companies may not want to hire an unknown person cold calling them. In the beginning stages of your dream job, you can sell your services at no cost to them. Perhaps, they might even end up hiring you.

4.    Never Give Up

You might not find your dream job as soon as start looking for one. You may land interviews, but may not secure the jobs, but the key here is never to give up. You need to keep searching for your dream job regardless if takes you a six months or a whole year. Since it can take you a while, remain at your old job or take up freelancing jobs in your field to showcase your talents.

Whether you are looking for your next dream job, or you are a Recruiter or Employer seeking a new employee the Social Media, Digital, Web, Creative and IT Global Jobs Board can help you.

For Job Seekers:  Instant application and access to thousands of Live Jobs covering an extensive range of sectors and worldwide locations from some of the world’s leading companies and recruiters.  Start by setting up a Job Mail Alert.

May27

Marketing yourself online as a creative

Social marketing as a creative

Working as a freelance creative can seem like a dream job. You get to do interesting, varied work while setting your own hours and working from home. But in addition to being your own boss, you also have to be your own agent, marketing manager and public relations officer. Whether you’re a copywriter, an artist or a designer, making contacts, attracting attention and securing work is arguably the most important aspect of what you do. You can be the most talented creative in the world, but if nobody knows about you, then you don’t get paid, and ultimately you might have to go back to waiting tables or office drudgery in order to make ends meet.

Thankfully, the internet and the wide variety of interactive media platforms available means it’s now easier than ever to market yourself online as a freelance creative professional. Your potential client base is now worldwide; you just need to reach out to them with a professional, authoritative presence that displays your abilities and experience to the best effect.

Presenting your portfolio

With an uncountable number of work portfolios available online, presentation is just as important as your actual work. Be creative and innovative in how you catch the eye of potential clients and draw them in to view your art, design or examples of your writing. The front page of your website should impress immediately. It should be striking and original, but also easy to navigate and interact with. It should also be appropriate to the kind of work you do as well as the market you’re aiming at.

If you’re not confident in building a personal website, go to the professionals. GoDaddy is probably the world’s best-known domain registrar and web hosting company, and is an online provider for many small businesses. The award-winning firm also provides e-business software and services. Founder Bob Parsons certainly knows the benefit of innovative marketing, using his personal charisma alongside a series of celebrity spokespeople in edgy, fun and often controversial advertisements that helped make GoDaddy a billion-dollar brand. And as this Bob Parsons news shows, his philanthropy also attracts attention.

Selling your brand

It can help to focus on a niche market in which you have expertise at first, and then gradually expand out from there. Find your USP (unique selling point) and emphasize it in your presentation. Use social media and have a consistent and eye-catching logo that you can use across all platforms and in online advertising. Also remember that networking and making contacts is the bread and butter of any online creative. Try to maintain a blog in addition to your regular website, where you can show off your work and keep up a controlled, ongoing interaction with the wider world that also allows a little bit more of your real self to come through.

A professional and engaging portfolio is the key to finding work as an online creative, as is a well designed website. Include references from contacts and impressive examples to stand out from the crowd, and let your talents shine through.

May26

Career advice for engineering

Engineer

Engineering is an exciting field that is always in demand. Here are some things to consider when deciding whether or not to pursue a career in engineering. 

Explore different sectors 

Engineers can specialize in many fields. Reading some job descriptions and looking at the websites of major firms can give you a better idea of what a job in a particular sector will actually entail. This can also make it easier for you to decide what engineering degree program will be best for your long-term career goals. Firms such as Transducer Techniques have found success by specializing in one sector of engineering. The company engineers state of the art load sensors that allow for better precision in fields such as manufacturing. Other exciting engineering sectors to consider include aerospace and automotive engineering.

Don’t be afraid to use your innovation and creativity

Engineers are thinkers. They are always looking for ways to create solutions. If you have a great idea, then there is nothing wrong with attempting to turn it into a reality. Some of the greatest innovations come from those that are not afraid to explore and think outside the box. For instance, Transducer Techniques started as an entrepreneur’s dream and found success by focusing on one specific aspect of engineering. Finding a niche market can ensure your success.

Explore employment with small companies as well as large

There are plenty of good opportunities with small to mid sized companies. A company does not have to be large to be extremely successful. Many people overlook these opportunities because they are determined to be employed by large firms. Small firms are also great places for those that lack real professional experience. If you are still a student, do not count out these smaller firms, as they can provide internship opportunities that can lead to better jobs later on down the road.

Recruitment fairs and networking are your friend

Websites and social media such as LinkedIn can be extremely helpful in networking with potential employers and other key people in your chosen sector of engineering. This can lead to many opportunities. Recruitment fairs or engineering trade shows are another valuable opportunity to meet firms face to face and find out what they are all about. This can help if you are still trying to hone in on which sector you feel most comfortable working in. Some firms offer several different sectors, so you may be able to work a bit in both.

Internships can make the difference

While a great education is important for employers, real hands on experience at an engineering firm can make them look at you in an even more positive way. Sometimes internships lead to full time employment at the firm that you intern at. These programs are very popular because they give firms a chance to recruit and nurture talented up and coming engineers.

Talk to experienced engineers

Talking to those that have been in the business for a long time can be valuable. They can give you insight into what is currently most in demand and what they find lacking in new engineers so that you don’t make the same mistakes.

Despite the challenges of this field, engineering can be a very rewarding career, and the wide variety of job opportunities in this sector ensures that there is sure to be a specialty field to suit your interests.

Apr29

5 Tricks that will make your LinkedIn profile stand out

LinkedIn_Profile

Why do you need to know some LinkedIn tricks?

LinkedIn is by far the biggest business and recruitment networking site that is available on the internet. There are many recruiters, headhunters and HR managers actively searching the listings for new employees as well as many businesses that are looking for business opportunities and partners. But if your profile does not make you stand out and let people know who you are and what you are capable of then you are likely to be overlooked. This is why it is vital to look at all of the professional LinkedIn tricks that are out there to help you to ensure that your LinkedIn profile gets noticed.

Make a detailed profile

Ensure that your profile is complete, use the tool that LinkedIn itself provides you to show your profile completeness and ensure that your profile is complete. Like your resume it needs to not show any major holes nor should you exaggerate anything that you include within your profile. If you are going to be making several updates and adding historical information to your profile it is often best to turn off your activity broadcasts so as not to bombard your connections with multiple updates. This can be done through “settings” and then “privacy controls” where you will find the option to turn them off.

Have a good heading and summary

Ensure that your summary and heading clearly reflect who you are and what your strengths and passions are. Most recruiters and others searchers will look at your headline and summary before they proceed any further with reading your profile so these must be spot on.

Use Keywords

Like any other search engine when you search for someone with a specific set of skills or a specific job title on LinkedIn the site will look for matches that contain the words that are being searched for. So if you are “Quality manager” and are looking for work in this area then you must ensure that you have the keywords used frequently within your profile, headline, and summary to ensure that you show up in the searches. So even if your last job title was “Organizational excellence manager” but the role was that of quality manager ensure that you say so or you will not get shown when people search for “quality manager”. The same goes for your skills and abilities, make sure that you clearly mention them and use the keywords that the recruiters and others will use when searching for them. This is one of the most important LinkedIn tricks from LinkedIn profile development experts if you want to be found by searchers.

Use a professional picture

While it may be OK to use that picture of you and the kids on holiday as your profile picture on Facebook or even a picture of your pet cat in a funny pose you will want to put forward a more professional image on LinkedIn. Always use a recent, clear professional quality picture of yourself for your profile picture on LinkedIn so that the searcher sees clearly who you are. Ensure that you are dressed and posed appropriately for your career in your picture.

Proofread carefully

Just like your resume, just a few simple avoidable mistakes can give completely the wrong impression to the reader of your profile. You must ensure that you carefully review and proofread your profile to eliminate all mistakes so that there is nothing to distract the reader or give the impression that you do not care about your profile.

Use a LinkedIn profile development service

A LinkedIn resume writing service or profile development service can help you to ensure that your profile is going to work for you. Having a professional with many years of experience using LinkedIn review and improve your profile can make a huge impact on how your profile is perceived and how often you will be found in searches. So if you really want to get the most from your profile use our LinkedIn tricks or contact resume writing service for professional help.

Apr09

10 Verbal Reasoning Test Tips You Need to Know

There are a number of verbal reasoning tests, however most are fundamentally the same. Reality is that verbal reasoning tests are used in a variety of interview and career scenarios nowadays. Learning what’s involved, what to expect and also some tips on how to master verbal reasoning will help you stand a better chance of getting the job you want.

10 verbal tips 9948597_orig

  1. Determine what kind of verbal reasoning test you will be asked to take.  The usual format is being provided with a short block of text and then questions with the choices of true, false, can’t say.  Usually the information that your prospective employer provides you with will tell you what the format of the test will be.
  2. Practice verbal reasoning questions prior to taking the test.  Do as many as you possibly can.  Get started preparing today to get ahead of all your competitors and start to practice with questions.   Practicing will help to improve your timing, accuracy and speed so that on the day of the real test you will be able to perform at your best. Here are some great tips on verbal reasoning for all ages.
  3. Practice your questions in exam-like conditions.  It should be a quiet environment that you can practice taking questions in without being disturbed for as long as the real test will take.  If you get used to taking questions in exam conditions it will make your real test much less intimidating.
  4. When you do practice questions, also take the time to review the ones you answer wrong.  This is an important thing to do since you will learn a lot more from your mistakes than the questions you answer correctly.
  5. Read news articles for practice and try to understand their main messages and key points.  Get accustomed to identifying what the key themes are and absorbing information.
  6. The night before your test, be sure to get a good night’s sleep.  Before sitting for the test, try to relax as much as possible.  Before you get started, take a deep breath.  It really can help with boosting your performance and calming your nerves.  View the test as a chance to demonstrate the knowledge that you have instead of a hurdle that needs to be jumped over.
  7. During the test, be sure to carefully read the questions and passages.  Re-read the questions you don’t understand.
  8. When answering the question, only use information that is contained in the passage.  Don’t use your own knowledge.  This includes even if you happen to be an expert on the subject matter that the passage is about.
  9. Before sitting for the test, carefully follow all of the instructions you are provided with.  Take note of how long the test is, along with the number of questions you need to answer within that time frame.  Quickly calculate how much time you have for answering each question.  That will help you stick with your time budget.  Move on if you happen to get stuck on one specific question.  Sticking to your time frame is very important when it comes to performing well on your verbal reasoning test.
  10. Take advantage of all of our learning resources.  We have numerous verbal reasoning tests that you can use to practice, in addition to articles full of tips and hints on how to effectively prepare for your test and improve how you perform on it.

So, follow these tips and you should be able to make more of your verbal reasoning test when it comes about.

Apr06

Student Excuses for being late

Train

Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to work with students in the capacity of a School Director, Director of Career Services and CEO of CreativeInterns.com. These positions often required students to either arrive on time for an appointment, interview or class and therefore enabled me to hear numerous reasons why students were late or just didn’t show up.

Over the past couple years, I started taking note of some of the more unique and often used excuses, truths and sometimes absurd flat-out lies that were told to me. I’ll leave it up to you to decide if these excuses were given in truth or to create empathy, shock or exemption from discipline for being late or not showing up. Enjoy!

Excuse #1

A homeless guy punched me because I was wearing a red hat.

Excuse #2

There was a really long line at the coffee shop.

Excuse #3

My shoe untied and I fell up the steps.

Excuse #4

There was fog and the ferry was delayed.

Excuse #5

My best friend was sick. (Note: can replace “best friend” with any living thing)

Excuse #6

I got my period.

Excuse #7

My train was delayed.

Excuse #8

I got lost.

Excuse #9

My alarm didn’t go off.

Excuse #10

I don’t know why I am late.

 

Written by: Marc Scoleri

Mar28

3 Things to Look for When Selecting A Shared Office

These days it is becoming less and less traditional to work a traditional job. More people are working from home, in remote locations, or quitting the corporate world of gray cubicles for tech startups in cold garages and freelancing from public computers at their local library. While it sounds nice to sit on the couch in pajamas or romantic to sip coffee while typing on your laptop at a local café, many workers soon realize that they are feeling lonely and isolated, and that they miss a few things about their old jobs. They miss eating lunch with coworkers and discussing who got kicked out of what reality television show. They miss gossiping during smoke breaks. They certainly do not miss that boss that was always breathing down their neck or those endless meetings that accomplished less than nothing, but they still need a community. If you need a little company at times, or just need somewhere to work that is not an arm’s length away from your refrigerator and one button away from the television, then a shared office or co-working space might be for you.

shared_office

Shared offices can be found in a variety of locations. Some are in spacious old cement lofts, others are in converted office buildings, and some are even in guest wings of private homes. Freelancers working for dozens of clients and remote workers hired by one person can all gather in these locations and form their own communities. You can rent your space by the day, the month, or the year. Basic locations with the bare minimum amenities charge around two hundred dollars a month. Others with better coffee, free black and white printing and comfy chairs, can get as expensive as five hundred per month.

But once you have decided to find a co-working space, how do you go about locating the very best one for you? Here are three things to look for: Does the shared office have the tools you need? What are the staff members and co-workers like? Is the office layout and location ideal for your needs?

Does the shared office have the tools you need?

Traditional company offices provide all of the necessary tools for their employees. You probably do not need half of them as a remote worker or freelancer, but some things like electricity, internet access, and drinks are always essential whether you are working at home of in a shared office. When you are looking for a co-working space, ask yourself what amenities you require. Do you just need a chair or a desk the size of a twin bed? Do you ride your bike to work and need to shower? How many electrical outlets do you need to run your tech? Are there books that you need every day for work that you do not want to drag around? If that is the case, you need extra storage to rent.

Do not assume that every place will have a full size kitchen complete with a stove and oven, a dishwasher, refrigerator, freezer, microwave, and espresso machine. There is no guarantee that every shared office will have a television for video conferencing or fax machines. If you need to print out color brochures for your marketing agenda, you do not want to rent a space with a printer that only prints black and white.

What are the staff members and co-workers like?

Most shared offices will have a manager on site or on call. All shared offices will have people coming and going. If you really want to be part of an office community again, it would be wise to avoid co-working spaces that only rent by the hour or by the day. You would not have consistent interaction with other freelancers. If you rent a desk for a year in a pod with six others who are committed to the same amount of time, that gives you people to not only bounce ideas off of but to be accountable to every day.

Do not forget to inquire, politely, how the people there act. Some people require silence while others thrive when there is background noise. Is it a room full of introverts all minding their own business and hiding behind headphones, or a room full of extroverts who never stop talking? Figure out who you want to be around before you commit.

Is the office layout and location ideal for your needs?

What is your travel situation like? When you look for a shared space, find out if you have to pay extra for parking. Check on bike racks, nearby taxi services, and bus and subway locations. Check out the neighborhood while you are at it. Will you be unable to concentrate after three in the afternoon because every kid on the block is playing street hockey outside your window after school? Does the local pizza shop deliver to your desk?

The internal layout matters, too. Look for shared spaces that can accommodate your every conceivable mood and need. Can you sit by a window one day and in a dark corner the next? If you need privacy, is there a place you can go to make those phone calls? When a client comes to town and wants a face to face meeting, will you be able to reserve a small meeting room? Maybe you are the type of person who wants to do some stretches outside to relieve stress – is there a courtyard that can fit your yoga mat?

Whether you are a photographer, a graphic designer, an architect, filmmaker, or a writer, all work at home employees eventually need a change of scene that is more than a desk. Because most shared offices allow people to rent a space by the day, you might try giving different locations a test drive. Meet different people, explore different neighborhoods and, most important of all, taste test all of the coffee! When you find one that meets your needs and answers the above questions to your satisfaction, you might have your new home office away from home.

Are you looking for a shared office space in New York City? Corporate Suites offers shared office spaces, virtual addresses and conference rooms in several convenient locations across Manhattan. Visit one of our locations today for a tour.